Donations, 2017 and beyond.

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Aloha all,

I have been asked where donations for this blog should be sent. I am not asking for money. I am just doing this blog on the side when time permits. What would be worthwhile is if you think the posts are worth anything to anyone you know, to pass it on, whether by reposting them electronically on Facebook, Twitter, your own blog, or by email; or printing them and handing them off; or the old-fashioned way, by talking about them.

However, if you indeed want to make donations, please consider making them to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Library and Archives! They hold much of the newspapers that I get my information from. They also are the caretakers of journals and letters and books containing historical information that cannot be found anywhere else. Do not forget to designate that your gift is to go to the Library and Archives.

Mahalo,
http://www.nupepa-hawaii.com

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Road to hell is paved with gold, 1915.

GIVES UP PLAN TO RESTORE OLD HAWAII TEMPLES

C. R. Forbes Warned from Undertaking by John G. Stokes; Will Put Up Markers

Plans that Charles R. Forbes, superintendent of public works, has had for the restoration of the heiaus on Hawaii will probably be abandoned as a result of a letter received by him recently from John G. Stokes, curator at the Bishop museum.

Mr. Stokes objects to having the heiaus built up again to a semblance of their original shape, as was the plan proposed by Superintendent Forbes, by taking rock that had fallen and resetting it in its old position. Mr. Stokes’ contention is that this would be an unwise thing to do, even in the interest of preserving the old relics. His statement is made after a careful study of them. Continue reading

Death of Edgar Henriques, 1931.

THAT KAMAAINA, EDGAR HENRIQUES, HAS LEFT THIS LIFE BEHIND

The kamaaina, Mr. Edgar Henriques, has left us, after being ill for a long time, at Queen’s Hospital at 4:30 in the afternoon of this past Sunday. He was 65 years old.

On June 14th, he returned to Queen’s Hospital. The following Wednesday he was operated upon. The doctor’s knowledge could not save his life.

His funeral was held at their home in the uplands of Nuuanu on Mamalahoa Street, the old road going to the cliff of Nuuanu, at 4 o’clock in the afternoon this past Tuesday. Continue reading

Banyan trees planted by graduating class of Kamehameha School, 1894.

Presentation of the Kamehameha School.

On the 26th of June, that being a Tuesday, there was held a ceremony to erect a monument to the students graduating from the school, before a large audience. John S. Aea was who spoke about the reason the children planted banyan [baniana] trees, and after this was over, each child who is graduating [e hemo ana] planted his tree. After this was done, the audience was invited to go beneath the shade of the trees to partake of the light refreshments prepared , and that was the close of the activities of the day. Continue reading

Our Museum, continued, 1900.

OUR MUSEUM

The Bishop Collection of Curios.

One of the Most Interesting Sights In Honolulu Pleasantly Described.

(Concluded.)

Death seems to have played an important part in the ancient regime, as the kings and chiefs had the power of life and death over their subjects. Then too, the priesthood, or kahunas, exercised what is termed the “tabu,” which prescribed certain rules and regulations for the natives, any violation of which was punishable by death; for instance a chief placed “tabu” sticks at the entrance to his hut; that meant to one and all, “Do not enter or pass within the shadow of the tabu sticks under pain of death;” if a Hawaiian subject, and even a petty chief, violated this tabu, he was instantly put to death; supplication was of no avail. The power of the kahunas in their exercise of the tabu, was so great and the superstitious awe of the common native so intense, that its effects have not died out even in this day and age. The common natives are yet prone to believe in their kahunas, and believe that they have the power to pray them to death; in olden days, if an enemy obtained any part of the body of another, a hair, a part of the finger nail, spittle, or anything of the body itself, he would give it to a kahuna and ask him to pray the other one to death; with great ceremony the kahuna would perform certain mysterious functions over the hair, say strange words, offer it before the poison god, and then announce that he was praying the native to death; this being told to the native so great his superstitious fear, he would go to his hut and in reality become sick over the thought of the dread summons made by the kahuna, and in many cases they actually died of the fright thus given them; and to this day many of the natives place more faith in their kahunas than in the “haole” or foreign physicians. If the praying did not perform the evil work, then a piece of the poison god was steeped and the fluid given the sufferer, it is said, which, acting upon his heart, killed him. On every hand in the museum are the evidences of kahunaism and death. There are stones, peculiarly shaped, (like a gourd,) with a small neck; these stones were suspended from the low door of a grass house in such a way that the person entering after the trap was set, would probably be crushed by the fall of the stone. They are made from lava rock. Continue reading