Kamehameha IV on Nihoa, 1857.

The French man-of-war “Eurydice” landed from Nihoa, with Kamehameha IV, the King, and the Governor of Oahu [Mataio Kekuanaoa], on the 25th of April. Continue reading

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S. M. Kamakau on history, 1868.

Letter from Mr. Kamakau.

To all Literary Gentlemen and Friends in Hawaii and elsewhere:

A certain person, styling himself in the Gazette, “A Hawaiian,” and whom I judge to be the same who signs himself in the Au Okoa “R. Kapihe,” and who, moreover, I doubt not,is one aspiring to a very high rank in the Kingdom, seems very jealous of my statements in the Hawaiian History which I am now writing. The line of descent of some of the present high chiefs, and their relationship to Kamehameha I, as I have stated it, appears to find especial disfavor in his eyes, perhaps and very probably, for the reason that another name very near at home to the above-mentioned writer is not included among those whom I have written down as descendants and near of kin to Kamehameha I. Continue reading

Travels of King Kamehameha IV to see the sounding sands of Nohili and more, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

We hear of the sailing of the King from here, and on the next day he landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night, he sailed to Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They spent the Sabbath there, and joined together and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the weekday, the rode horse, fished; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. That evening, they got on board the Maria and sailed for Kaula. The next morning they reached there. Some of them jumped into the ocean and swam ashore with difficulty, for there was a shark there and it was difficult to go ashore; there is a severe cliff and no bay. The King went ashore amongst these difficulties, ascended the cliff. The chiefesses remained on the ship. Continue reading

Queen Victoria’s letter to King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emalani, 1863.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

The Letter of Victoria to the Hawaiian Monarchs.—It was  made known to some of us, the letter of Queen Victoria to our beloved Monarchs, showing her sadness and he compassion for the misfortune that befell the Alii Haku o Hawaii, the greatly loved one who was taken away by gracious God. Continue reading

The death of Jonah Piikoi and his autobiography, 1859.

The death of J. Piikoi.

On the 26th of April, the Honorable J. Piikoi, one of the alii of this Hawaiian archipelago died. He was a much admired man for his competence and his determination in the duties given to him. He was 55 years old, and the sickness he died of was of quick pulse [? aalele nui], and problems with his blood flow, and he died.

Before the death of Piikoi, he prepared a story of his life, from his birth until the day he wrote it, that being the 7th of April. This is it below:

The Autobiography of J. Piikoi

I was born in the month of Ikuwa, that being January, in the year of the Lord 1804.

I was born in Waimea, Kauai, and that was where I was raised until the first Liholiho landed on Kauai on the 22nd of the month of  July, 1821. Continue reading