Passing of Samuel Kamakea Kamakaia, 1919.

AN EXPRESSION OF LOVE FOR SAM KAMAKEA KAMAKAIA.

Samuel K. Kamakaia.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Much aloha to you:—Please place in one of your open columns of the speedy messenger of the emotional and dreadful story below of my dear husband, my companion, partner who I talked to, and the one I faced the hardships of this life, who left me and his great many friends and intimates; so that his friends and many intimates from the wind-facing promontory that gazes at the rain blown upon the sea at Kumukahi all the way to where the sun sinks at the base of Lehua, that Samuel Kamakea Kamakaia has passed on to the path to the back of Kane, and you will no more see his features, you will no more hear his voice, he sleeps the eternal sleep, and it is for him that I mourn with tears and regret not to be pacified, while I remember his words that I cannot forget:

Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his!Continue reading

Z. P. K. Kawaikaumaiikamakaokaopua’s treatise on canoe building, 1922.

CANOE BUILDING AND ITS CHARACTERISTICS.

(Written by Z. P. K. Kawaikaumaiikamakaokaopua.)

Canoe building is one of the greatest trades; it is with great knowledge and thought that this is done. And when the important high chiefs of Napoopoo were living, they being Kamakau; Kahalau; Kanuha; Kekukahiko; and Kanihomauole, the son of Kiilaweau; Kanihomauole decided to go to Maui in search of a number of canoe building kahuna for himself. And that alii Kanihomauole did indeed go with some attendants from his royal court.

When they went, they landed at Hana, Maui. Kaahumanu was there living at the time, and was married (hoao) with Kamehameha, who was away on Oahu. And because it was heard often that Kanihomauole was the child of Kiilaweau, the alii of highest blood, and that he was kin to Kamehameha, the Conqueror of the Nation, they were welcomed along with those who came, they being Kahula, Kamaka, Naili Sr., Keaka and Puuki.

The queen asked, “why have you come?” The alii Kanihomauole replied, “I have come in search of a kahuna kalaiwaa for myself, and I have come to see the two of you to get my kahuna kalaiwaa.” “Yes, you will have one. Let us remain until Papa Keeaumoku and the boy Kamehameha returns; they will be back tomorrow.” And they waited, and spent the night, and those that came were treated well by the kamaaina of the place.

[This is how the piece on canoes by Kalokuokamaile begins on 10/26/1922, and it continues on in the Kuokoa until 2/15/1923. This is one of the many priceless translations appearing in the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum’s Hawaiian Ethnographic Notes (HEN) Collection.  HEN: Newspapers, October 26, 1922.

Kalokuokamaile was very prolific. This series is then followed by yet another, this time on net making!]

(Kuokoa, 10/26/1922, p. 7)

KE KALAIWAA ANA AME KONA MAU ANO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 43, Aoao 7. Okatoba 26, 1922.