Yes to Hawaiian language. No to Dole, 1903.

DOLE’S VETOES TURNED DOWN

SENATE UNANIMOUSLY SAYS HIS LANGUAGE RESOLUTION VETO IS ALL RIGHT BUT IT WON’T DO.

The Senate played football with Governor Dole’s vetoes this morning. The language veto was thrown into the scrap heap first. This veto disapproved the joint resolution asking Congress to make the Hawaiian the official language the same as English. Continue reading

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Dole vetoes Hawaiian language, 1903.

DOLE’S FIRST VETO

Governor Dole sent a message to the Legislature this afternoon announcing his veto of the joint resolution requesting an amendment of the Organic Act to allow the use of the Hawaiian language.

The Governor has also vetoed the beer license bill.

(Evening Bulletin, 4/8/1903, p. 1)

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Evening Bulletin, Volume XIII, Number 2425, Page 1. April 8, 1903.

The day will come…, 1893.

ADMINISTRATION OF THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT

To all beloved makaainana of the alii, Queen Liliuokalani, let it be known to all of you. The state of the Nation at this time, is under the administration of the provisional government by the reformist party [aoao hoomaemae], and military law is proclaimed by the new ministers of the provisional Government, that is: Continue reading

The Queen’s Protest. 1893.

KUKALA KUE A KE ALIIAIMOKU.

“O wau, Liliuokalani, ma ka lokomaikai o ke Akua, malalo o ke Kumukanawai o ke Aupuni Hawaii, Moiwahine, ma keia ke hoike paa nei i Ko’u kue i kekahi hana a mau hana paha a pau i lawelawe ia e kue ana Ia’u iho a me ke Aupuni Kumukanawai o ke Aupuni Hawaii e kekahi poe e koi ana ua kukulu lakou he Aupuni Kuikawa no ka manawa no keia Aupuni.

“Ke ae wale nei no Au mamuli o ka mana oi ikaika o Amerika Huipuia nona hoi ke Kuhina Elele Nui, ka Meamahaloia John L. Stevens, ua kauoha aku i na koa o Amerika Huipuia e hoopae ia mai ma Honolulu, a ua kukala ae e kokua no oia i ua Aupuni Kuikawa ’la no ka Manawa i oleloia.

“Nolaila, i mea e kaupale aku ai i na hookuia ana o na puali i hoolawa ia me na lako kaua, a malia paha o hoopoino ia ke ola; nolaila, malalo o keia Kuahaua Kue a i kauhola ia hoi e ua mana ikaika ’la, ke ae wale nei no Au e panee aku i Ko’u Mana a hiki i ka manawa a ke Aupuni o Amerika Huipuia, mamuli o na mea oiaio e waiho ia aku ai imua ona, e hoololi ai i na hana a kona Luna Aupuni a e hoonoho hou Ia’u maluna o ka mana A’u e koi nei ma ke ano Aliiaimoku o ka Paeaina Hawaii.”

“Hanaia ma Honolulu, i keia la 17 o Ianuari, M. H. 1893.”

“[Kakauinoaia:]

LILIUOKALANI, R.

Samuel Parker,
Kuhina o ko na Aina E.

Wm. H. Cornwell,
Kuhina Waiwai.

Jno. F. Colburn,
Kuhina Kalaiaina.

A. P. Peterson,
Loio Kuhina.

“Ia S. B. Dole a me kekahi poe e ae o ke Aupuni Kuikawa no ka Manawa o ka Paeaina Hawaii.”

[I Liliuokalani, by the grace of God and under the constitution of the Hawaiian Kingdom, Queen, do hereby solemnly protest against any and all acts done against myself and the constitutional Government of the Hawaiian Kingdom by certain persons claiming to have established a provisional government of and for this Kingdom.

That I yield to the superior force of the United States of America, whose minister plenipotentiary, His Excellency John L. Stevens, has caused United States troops to be landed at Honolulu and declared that he would support the said provisional government.

Now, to avoid any collision of armed forces and perhaps the loss of life, I do, under this protest, and impelled by said force, yield my authority until such time as the Government of the United States shall, upon the facts being presented to it, undo the actions of its representatives and reinstate me in the authority which I claim as the constitutional sovereign of the Hawaiian Islands.

Done at Honolulu this 17th day of January, A. D. 1893.

Liliuokalani, R.

Samuel Parker,
Minister of Foreign Affairs.

William H. Cornwell,
Minister of Finance.

John F. Colburn,
Minister of the Interior.

A. P. Peterson,
Attorney-General.

To S. B. Dole and some others of the Provisional Government of the Hawaiian Islands.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 2. Ianuari 18, 1893.

 

On patriotism, 1894.

THE ARRANT COWARDS.

It is refreshing to hear the supporters of the revolutionary Americans accuse the loyal citizens of Hawaii of cowardice. The attitude on the 17th of January of the men, who boast of their patriotism and heroism, was not a proof of the qualities now claimed by them. The p. gs. remind us of the small boy standing behind his big and armed brother—and two policemen as guards—yelling to the lonely boy on the other side with no arms and no police: “Come on, come on you coward and I will fix you.”

The abject cowardice of the government was further illustrated today. A well-known contractor, a man of many years residence, and of unblemished standing in this community desired some cartridges for his revolver. He as many other civilized citizens enjoy during their stay at the Waikiki beach all manly sports, and he fishes, rows, jumps, boxes, and shoots to the target. As a law-abiding citizen he made a formal request to the fir of E. O. Hall & Son, for 100 cartridges and his requisition was returned crossed in red ink “refused by the Marshal.” Continue reading

A new scathing “Hawaii Ponoi,” 1894.

TOPICS OF THE DAY.

The Advertiser with its usual ingenuity has finally found the cause for all the opposition among the Hawaiians to the P. G., and to the annexation cause. It is all on account of Hawaii Ponoi, our national anthem, and the morning organette demands, and immediate change in the words of that time-honored song. The new version given by the Advertiser will hardly be adopted, and we therefore take the liberty to substitute some words which we submit to the kind consideration of all loyal Hawaiians who are to be forbidden to sing the anthem of their native land. How is this brother Castle?

HAWAII PONOI HOU.

Pakaha Hawaii,
Kipi i ka lahui,
Na welo mikanele,
Na Pi Gi.

Ino ka ia e,
Ia Kolekaaka,
Pale i ka nani,
Me ka uahoa.

[NEW HAWAII PONOI

They plunder Hawaii
Conspire against the people,
Those missionary descendants,
The P. G.

How vile he is,
That Kole Kaaka,*
Pushing aside beauty,
With his cruelty.]

*”Kole Kaaka” can be found in the dictionary. Look it up. This term with a negative connotation is used often during this period. Might it also be a play on the name Dole? “Wretched Dole”?

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/9/1894, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 7, Page 2. January 9, 1894.

Reforesting Puu Ohia, Oahu, 1900.

PERTAINING TO GROWING SANDALWOOD.

On the return of Governor Dole from his travels to Hawaii, he brought back some seed of trees growing in the mountains of that island to grow here on the ridges of Puu Ohia [Tantalus]. Among these were koa and iliahi seeds. This tree, the iliahi, will be increased; it was believed no longer existing on these islands because of abuse during the days of Kamehameha I. However, it is said that there is a great number of these trees growing in the mountains of Molokai. From here forth, the government will try to care well for these ancient tree of the land.

(Aloha Aina, 8/25/1900, p. 5)

NO KA HOOULU ANA I NA LAAU ILIAHI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 34, Aoao 5. Augate 25, 1900.