On patriotism, 1894.

THE ARRANT COWARDS.

It is refreshing to hear the supporters of the revolutionary Americans accuse the loyal citizens of Hawaii of cowardice. The attitude on the 17th of January of the men, who boast of their patriotism and heroism, was not a proof of the qualities now claimed by them. The p. gs. remind us of the small boy standing behind his big and armed brother—and two policemen as guards—yelling to the lonely boy on the other side with no arms and no police: “Come on, come on you coward and I will fix you.”

The abject cowardice of the government was further illustrated today. A well-known contractor, a man of many years residence, and of unblemished standing in this community desired some cartridges for his revolver. He as many other civilized citizens enjoy during their stay at the Waikiki beach all manly sports, and he fishes, rows, jumps, boxes, and shoots to the target. As a law-abiding citizen he made a formal request to the fir of E. O. Hall & Son, for 100 cartridges and his requisition was returned crossed in red ink “refused by the Marshal.” Continue reading

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A new scathing “Hawaii Ponoi,” 1894.

TOPICS OF THE DAY.

The Advertiser with its usual ingenuity has finally found the cause for all the opposition among the Hawaiians to the P. G., and to the annexation cause. It is all on account of Hawaii Ponoi, our national anthem, and the morning organette demands, and immediate change in the words of that time-honored song. The new version given by the Advertiser will hardly be adopted, and we therefore take the liberty to substitute some words which we submit to the kind consideration of all loyal Hawaiians who are to be forbidden to sing the anthem of their native land. How is this brother Castle?

HAWAII PONOI HOU.

Pakaha Hawaii,
Kipi i ka lahui,
Na welo mikanele,
Na Pi Gi.

Ino ka ia e,
Ia Kolekaaka,
Pale i ka nani,
Me ka uahoa.

[NEW HAWAII PONOI

They plunder Hawaii
Conspire against the people,
Those missionary descendants,
The P. G.

How vile he is,
That Kole Kaaka,*
Pushing aside beauty,
With his cruelty.]

*”Kole Kaaka” can be found in the dictionary. Look it up. This term with a negative connotation is used often during this period. Might it also be a play on the name Dole? “Wretched Dole”?

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/9/1894, p. 2)

HawaiiHolomua_1_9_1894_2.png

Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 7, Page 2. January 9, 1894.

Reforesting Puu Ohia, Oahu, 1900.

PERTAINING TO GROWING SANDALWOOD.

On the return of Governor Dole from his travels to Hawaii, he brought back some seed of trees growing in the mountains of that island to grow here on the ridges of Puu Ohia [Tantalus]. Among these were koa and iliahi seeds. This tree, the iliahi, will be increased; it was believed no longer existing on these islands because of abuse during the days of Kamehameha I. However, it is said that there is a great number of these trees growing in the mountains of Molokai. From here forth, the government will try to care well for these ancient tree of the land.

(Aloha Aina, 8/25/1900, p. 5)

NO KA HOOULU ANA I NA LAAU ILIAHI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 34, Aoao 5. Augate 25, 1900.

Necker claimed for Hawaii, 1894.

THE JOURNEY OF THE IWALANI!

NECKER BECOMES HAWAII’S!

The Islands of the Hawaiian Archipelago!

In the afternoon of May 25, this town was all astir at the news that the steamship Iwalani was headed on a long expedition. At 5:20 of that evening, the Iwalani sailed on its mystifying mission. On board was J. A. King, Minister of the Interior, and the crew was increased by ten more sailors. Ka Leo¹ newspaper was much alarmed thinking that the Provisional Government was looking for a place to keep all of the royalists [anee alii]. The royalists proved this worthless piece of news by Ka Leo printing a letter that they found in some dung, but the people…

THE HAWAIIAN ARCHIPELAGO.

…of proper thinking, they were not anxious. The wonder of the people was highly escalated because the British warship Champion followed half an hour after the Iwalani left. And as is usual in Honolulu nei, news soon spoke of the warship chasing after the Iwalani. These senseless ideas were let go when the Iwalani returned on Tuesday evening, May 29.

From what was said by Captain Freeman of the Iwalani, they passed Nihoa in the evening of Saturday, May 26, and at 11 o’clock on the following morning, May 27, the anchor of the Iwalani was let down on the leeward side of Necker [Neka] Island, 41 hours sailing from Honolulu. The skiff was let down and Captain King, Captain Freeman, engineer Norton, along with seven sailors went on.

NECKER ISLAND.

This island is a heap of rocks, and is 260 feet tall. There is a steep cliff rising from the ground, and it was with great effort that they climbed up until a proper place to where Captain King stood a flagpole and the Hawaiian flag waved in the wind. This island was annexed to the Hawaiian nation, and this is the proclamation that Captain King read: Continue reading

Christmas tree at Iolani Palace, 1910.

CHRISTMAS TREE LADEN WITH PRESENTS

THE FOREIGN CHRISTMAS TREE

Children lined up before the Executive Building to Receive Presents.

The Visitors along with the Children were Drenched in the Falling Rain on that Morning.

Two years have past since the start of the giving of a Malihini Christmas Tree heavy with presents of all sorts to the indigent children, and this year it seems as if there was the most presents collected along with the most children, reaching more than about two thousand, but showers coming down when the presents were being handed out was problematic for the little children and the gifts as well, and many of the presents were damaged.

Within the falling rain nonetheless, the children remained standing in line until they received their gift, and looking at their expressions, the happiness upon getting their present outweighed the difficulties of the rain. Continue reading

Dogs and the Leprosy Colony, 1903.

DOGS TO BE TAKEN

The Board of Health [Papa Ola] released a new rule which was approved by Governor S. B. Dole, ordering each and every leprosy patient and kokua of the leprosy colony of Molokai, that they may not keep more than one dog. The supervisor will enforce these new rules of the Board of Health.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 6)

HOPU IA NA ILIO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 6. Aperila 25, 1903.

More on John K. Waiamau and others, 1893.

PERSONAL.

President Dole’s illness has been caused by an ulcerated tooth. He is now on the mend.

John K. Waiamau, the accomplished young architect is going to Chicago at the expense of his employer, C. B. Ripley to study architectural drawing.

Ornithologist Palmer returned on the Pele last evening from Makaweli, where he has been collecting birds for the British Museum.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/18/1893, p. 2)

PERSONAL.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 122, Page 2. August 18, 1893.