Reforesting Puu Ohia, Oahu, 1900.

PERTAINING TO GROWING SANDALWOOD.

On the return of Governor Dole from his travels to Hawaii, he brought back some seed of trees growing in the mountains of that island to grow here on the ridges of Puu Ohia [Tantalus]. Among these were koa and iliahi seeds. This tree, the iliahi, will be increased; it was believed no longer existing on these islands because of abuse during the days of Kamehameha I. However, it is said that there is a great number of these trees growing in the mountains of Molokai. From here forth, the government will try to care well for these ancient tree of the land.

(Aloha Aina, 8/25/1900, p. 5)

NO KA HOOULU ANA I NA LAAU ILIAHI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 34, Aoao 5. Augate 25, 1900.

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Special piano built, 1901.

PIANO MADE WITH HAWAIIAN WOOD.

Bergstrom Music Company [hui kuai mea kani Bergstrom] received a piano made with koa wood. This piano was made in Chickering, Boston under the order of Prince Kalanianaole. The cost for the building fo this piano was about $1,000, and the koa wood it was made from was sent from Hawaii nei.

The look of this instrument is lovely, and above where it is played is placed the crown of Hawaii and the words “Kulia Kanuu.” The instrument will be placed under the care of Prince Kawananakoa when the Prince Kalanianaole and his wife returns from their trip around the world.

[Does anyone know if this piano still exists? I sure hope so.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/2/1901, p. 5)

PIANO I HANAIA ME KA LAAU HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VII, Helu 5, Aoao 5. Feberuari 2, 1901.

Roots of koa stretch to India? 1919.

From India Comes the Koa Growing in Our Forests

A malihini by the name of Mr. Rock has been spreading in our newspapers that the Koa growing in our forests came from India and that the seeds of this tree came from India brought by birds and dispersed in Hawaii nei. Continue reading

More on the building of the Bishop Museum, 1902.

Sent to Minnesota

KOA TREES FOR THE MUSEUM.

Aboard the Clipper Ship, S. N. Castle, were taken koa trees from the two Kona [North and South Kona] for cases and other decorations for the Museum standing at the Kamehameha School. The koa trees will be taken to San Francisco and from there they will be taken aboard steam locomotive to Minnesota, and there they will be made into beautiful glass cases [ume aniani] or perhaps beautiful stairs for the planned annex for the Museum.

These koa trees were selected from places in Kona, Hawaii, and when they are fashioned, they will be fine decorations. When the idea for a new annex first came up, the lack of koa was noticed, being that only native woods were wanted for the interior. People were soon sent to the two Kona to search for koa fitting for the purpose, and when it was found, it was sent here to Honolulu. All together, the gathered lumber totals 26,000 feet. They weigh seven tons. Being that the job was given to a company in Minnesota, the koa was sent there, and from there it will return to Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 1/31/1902, p. 6)

Hoounaia no Minesota

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 5, Aoao 6. Ianuari 31, 1902.

Canoe Building, 1924.

The Art of Canoe Building is Being Revived in Hawaii

In the olden days of Hawaii nei, canoe building [kalaiwaa] was one of the occupations deftly done by Hawaiians, but during the years since, this work has gone down to but a fraction; but these days, it is being started up once again in Honaunau, South Kona, Hawaii.

Charley Apo along with his assistants are undertaking this endeavor of carving waa from large koa trees growing on the land of Paris and Company [Hoahana Parika ?].

The koa is fell in the high mountains, then it is roughly carved out into the form of a waa, and then dragged to sea by animals.

Twelve large waa are being carved by Charley Apo in a building prepared for this work, and he is able to fill all orders that he receives as per specifications wanted, from large to small.

In the picture on the far left, Davis Paris can be seen with two waa that are unfinished; to the right is Charley Apo ; to the right of that are many unfinished waa. Below on the left is a nearly finished waa; in the middle is an assistant of Charley Apo; to the right of that is a roughly completed waa for Alika Dowsett.

[I wish the newspapers were reshot clearly so not only the words are sharp and legible, but so that pictures and images are as clear as possible…]

(Kuokoa, 6/5/1924, p. 2)

Ke Hoalaia Mai Nei ka Oihana Kalaiwaa ma Hawaii

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Iune 5, 1924.