Hillebrand brings in frogs, 1857.

Something New.

Kauka Makaainana (Dr. Hillebrand) has five FROGS [RANA] from California and he has put them in his taro patch. They are doing fine. They make strange noises. Their nature is that they are animals that have two lives. They eat small bugs: flies, grasshoppers, and other things like that. Therefore they are good. O People of Honolulu, do not harm these new things if you see them, because they are valuable.

(Hae Hawaii, 9/30/1857, p. 106)

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou—Helu 27, Aoao 106. Sepetemaba 30, 1857.

More on bees and the man known to Hawaiians as Okamu haole, 1897.

An Industry That Has Made Rapid Strides.

It would be a difficult thing to fix the date of the beginning of the bee industry in the Hawaiian Islands. As far back as the “oldest inhabitant” can run his thoughts, honey has been gathered in the mountains. Back in the ’60s one of the characters of the city was Dwight Holcomb, known to the small boys and natives as “Old Oakum.” He was an eccentric individual and was the “bogie man” to the young boys of that time. Continue reading

More on the importing of birds and plants and laborers, 1865.

Planters’ Society.

A general meeting of the Society was held at the Court House on Saturday last, April 1st, 1865, pursuant to a call published by his Ex. R. C. Wyllie.

Mr. Montgomery was called to the Chair, and stated that the objects of the meeting were, first, to consider the amalgamation of the Planters’ Society with the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society.

Hon. G. M. Robertson, appointed at a former meeting to report on the proposed step, stated that the simplest way for attaining the object was for the members of the Planters’ Society to unite individually with the R. H. A. Society. Continue reading

Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society and the importing of plants and animals, 1865.

[Communicated.]

Mr. Editor:—The eminent success which has attended Dr. Hillebrand’s first consignment of plants and birds per Alberto for the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society, ought certainly to operate as a stimulus to all who feel interested in the material progress of these islands, to lend a helping hand to enable him to avail freely of the facilities and opportunities he now possesses of procuring and forwarding here the vast number of plants, &c., suitable to our climate, Continue reading

On rice birds in Punaluu, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Hiohiona o Koolauloa.”]

Pertaining to Punaluu.—This is rice farming lands for Chulan & Co. There is much rice in this land; there is much rice as well amongst the Hawaiians in Waiono, Makana, Puheemiki, Kapano, and Papaakoko; Continue reading

Queen’s Hospital, 1860.

The Hospital.

It was said in the report of Dr. Hillebrand that was printed in the Polynesian, the number of sick treated in the hospital from the 1st of August, 1859 until now, is 1,354! 835men, 519 women. Of these people, 107 are inpatients; 76  men and 31 women. There were 12 who died, and over 4,000 doses of medicines were administered. The hospital is currently at full capacity. Continue reading