S. K. Maialoha sent to Kalaupapa, 1905.

LEAVES THE LAND

SEES THE LAND OF SUFFERING AS A STRANGER.

O Swift Messenger of the communities of Hawaii, floating all the way foreign lands, Ke Aloha Aina Newspaper. Greetings:—

On the 12th of this September, in the morning hours, there was crying as people walked outside of the grounds of that hallowed castle, and at 8 o’clock or so was when our belongings were readied. The wailing was heard of women for their husbands, men for their wives, parents for their children, children for their parents, family for family.

And at 11 o’clock, the patients were called to board the car; a veil was spread, and people could no more see us; the cars left the grounds, and great mourning was heard; your writer saw his dear mama and our child for the last time; and the writer heard the calling of my beloved Ape, “O Papa, come back to me.” Continue reading

Jules Tavernier, 1885

[Found under: “NA NU HOU HAWAII”]

Illustrations by Tavernier were sent, a great many of his drawings of the storied places [wahi pana] of Hawaii nei, to the illustrated newspaper Harper’s of New York, with the hopes that they will be engraved in stone and arranged in the newspaper.

[Jules Tavernier not only did these illustrations for Harper’s Magazine, but he did spectacular paintings as well. Click here for the latest post from Nanea Armstrong-Wassel on a painting by Tavernier.]

(Ko Hawaii Paeaina, 3/21/1885, p. 2)

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Ko Hawaii Paeaina, Buke VIII, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Maraki 21, 1885.

Timoteo Haalilio, 1845.

SOME THINGS PERTAINING TO HAALILIO.

Koolau, Oahu, was where he was born; his parents were prominent people. His father died when he was a youth, and thereafter his mother (that being Eseka who is still living) became Governor of Molokai. When he was 8 years old, he joined the family of the King, Kamehameha III, and lived with them. They were at Hilo at this time. When he was 13, Haalilio entered the school of Bingham [Binamu] in Honolulu, and he studied English and…

(Elele, 4/25/1845, p. 13)

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Ka Elele, Buke I, Pepa 2, Aoao 13, Aperila 25, 1845.

Continue reading

Remarks on the state of the United States.

Some newspapers are trouncing the Captain and Clerk of the steamboat Globe for refusing a seat at their breakfast table to Haalilio, Embassador from the King of the Hawaiian or Sandwich Islands to this Government—the said Envoy laboring under the original sin of being copper-colored. Of course, the steamboat men were wrong—but was it indeed their fault, or that of a diseased public opinion—a ridiculous and disgraceful popular prejudice? Suppose this Haalilio had been a mulatto native of the United States—a free voter and ‘sovereign’ of this Country—the son, for instance, of our late Vice President—these same papers would probably have abused the Captain if he had given him a seat at the common table, and even stigmatized the passengers for consenting to eat with him! And why is not a cleanly and well-bred American freeman as good as a Sandwich Island dignitary?—There is no Country on earth where Social Aristocracy is more exclusive and absurd than here, and the less manhood a person has the more he plumes himself on his external and factitious advantages over some one whom he tries hard to look down upon.

[It sounds like things really have not changed so much.]

(New York Daily Tribune, 1/28/1843, p. 2)

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The New York Daily Tribune, Volume II, Number 250, Page 2. January 28, 1843.

 

Queen Liliuokalani at La Kuokoa celebration, 1896.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

J. K. Kaulia, president-elect of the Hui Aloha Aina, entertained the delegates and other friends at his residence on Saturday. The Hawaiian flag was in evidence, and also hoisted on the new flag staff for the first time in recognition  of Independence. Queen Liliuokalani was present.

(Independent, 11/30/1896, p. 3)

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The Independent, Volume III, Number 444, Page 3. November 30, 1896.

Passing of Victoria Kahoa Kaahumanu Tolman, 1893.

AN OLD LANDMARK GONE.

Death of an Adopted Daughter of Queen Kaahumanu.

Mrs. Victoria Kahoa Kaahumanu Tolman died at the residence of Hon. F. S. Pratt, Punchbowl street, of heart failure, at 9:30 o’clock yesterday evening, at the ripe age of 78, Kahoa Virginia is a twin sister to Teresa Oana [Aana], both being born in Kailua, Kona, in August, 1815. Shortly after their birth, in fact the same night, both were adopted by Queen Kaahumanu, and taken from their home. Their mother was Holau, a true descendant of Lonoikamakahiki and Keikilani, King and Queen of Puna, of whom there are many stories in Hawaiian history. The father was the late Jean Jassin Rives [Reeves], commonly known as Father John, of the Catholic Mission, who went to England with Kamehameha II. Continue reading

Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Pratt turns 94! 1928.

94 YEARS IN THIS LIFE

On the 11th of this month, Kaukau Alii Mrs. Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Pratt turned ninety-four years old.

She was born in 1834, the year that Kamehameha IV was born and the year also that the newspaper Ka Lama Hawaii began to be printed. Continue reading

Anybody ever see one of these blue ribbons or blue badges of the annexationists? 1893.

[Found under: “TOPICS OF THE DAY.”]

The appointment of Mr. Kauhi to be Sheriff for the District of Ewa is very characteristic of the Provisional Government. Because Mr. Kauhi has sported a blue annexation badge he has been considered fit by the Attorney General to hold the responsible position to which he has been appointed. The blue badge has evidently made Mr. Smith forget that the honest(!) and super—virtuous Legislature of 1888 expelled Mr. Kauhi who was the member from Ewa for being convicted of being a bribe taker—but perhaps bribe-taking is not considered a sin among the P. G. rulers and not considered a bad quality for a police officer. We now fully expect to see Mr. W. O. Smith pitchfork that other honest (?) Hawaiian Mr. J. W. Kalua into office—say as judge for Wailuku. “Birds of a feather flock together” seems to be a true proverb as far as our missionary government is concerned.

[In the article, “BLOUNT AT HAWAII” printed on the front page of the Chicago Daily Tribune on 4/6/1893, mentioned is a dark-blue ribbon with the words ANNEXATION CLUB being worn by the members of said club to present themselves to James Blount.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/10/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 8, Page 2. January 10, 1893.

Norrie-Mcgrew decision, 1893.

Norrie and the Star.

On Saturday morning Judge Foster gave his ruling on the demurer interposed by the defendant in the Norrie-McGrew libel case. It was in favor of Norrie. Judge Hartwell immediately appealed to the Supreme Court. Later in the day A. P. Peterson, the attorney for the complainant, notified the court that the case would not be prosecuted so it has been dropped from the calendar.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 6/6/1893, p. 9)

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Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXVIII, Number 23, Page 9. June 6, 1893.

Royalists and Annexationists and libel, 1893.

CAME TO BLOWS.

Annexationists and Royalists Have a Little Set-to.

There was a small-sized row between six Annexationists and twenty Royalists in the Merchants’ Exchange saloon Saturday night. Norrie, a Royalist hanger-on of the Holomua, got the contents of a spitoon, while Ned Thomas, the “anatomist,” got a beer mug along side the head.

(Hawaiian Star, 5/29/1893, p. 5)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 54, Page 5. May 29, 1893.