Pass down the moolelo! 2017.

What are we doing today to carry on the legacy of that writer of moolelo? Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau and his fellow scholars at Lahainaluna were taught to do research and to write down and teach the moolelo of their people.

He says in a response to a critique that alii genealogy was very kapu and was not to be given to anyone else except their own children, “In my opinion, should Kauakahiakaola folks, the genealogists, arise from the realm of po, they will rejoice in this [my telling of chiefly genealogies], for it is gone with them, and they would be happy to see it once more.” (“He wahi ai no ka Nonanona…” Nonanona, 2/14/1843, p. 92)

Pass down the moolelo you do know to the next generation, whether they be family moolelo, or otherwise. Learn more moolelo. Pass them down.

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Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau, ke kakau moolelo, in his early days, 1845.

SOME ANCIENT MATTERS OF HAWAII NEI.

Lahainaluna, Dec. 10, 1845

When the islands of Hawaii were created by Kumuhonua and his wife Haloiho; when Kumuhonua slept and rose from his sleep, the earth turned and the shaking was called an earthquake [olai].

At that time, the duties were not divided, and names were not given to the many things.

Therefore all things were clarified, animals, birds, crawling things, things with wings that flew in the sky, and men.

Each thing was given its duty, and the duties were clearly divided, appropriate for each living being and the things without the breath of life; this distribution of duties was done at Umauma in Hilo Paliku.

After lands were handed out, along came Halo, who stood beside the river and asked for land for himself. “I want land for myself,” he said to the one giving out land; “You have come when all the land was given out, and there is only one land left.” “Where?” “The polapilau.” “That is my land,” and that land became the land of Halo; completed was the giving of land to those with the breath of life and without the breath of life.

At Molea in Hamakua, that is the place where all the fish of the ocean gathered, the large fish and tiny fish; it was there that all the fish were marked; the stripped ones, the red ones, the white one, the yellow ones, all the different ones in the sea; Kapuhili was the head of those who did the marking; upon all of the unmarked fish, ash was strewn and they became spotted.

All the fishes of the ocean were given its name.

Kumuhonua was the first man, and Haloiho was the first woman. The gods were Ku and Lono.

When Lono (Captain Cook) landed in Hawaii nei. The men went aboard the ship and spoke Hawaiian to the haole; the haole however did not listen to what was spoken; therefore the haole spoke in their language, refusing, without listening. “No more;” so the Hawaiians clarified, “Molea is kapu,” “no more,” “Molea at Hamakua is kapu,” and the haole nodded without under-…

(Elele, 2/10/1846, p. 179)

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Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 23, Aoao 179. Feberuari 10,  1846.

It wasn’t only Kaʻū that dispatched oppressive aliʻi, 1865.

[Found under: KA MOOLELO O HAWAII NEI. HELU 14.]

During the period of Lonoikamakahiki, a section went to his older brother, Kanaloakuaana; Kona, Kohala, and Hamakua were ruled by Kanaloakuaana. Kau, Puna, and Hilo were ruled by Lonoikamakahiki.

There were many chiefs of Hawaii [island] who were warring, and there were many alii that were killed by the makaainana for their tyranny and for plundering the belongings of the makaainana. Continue reading

On Kepelino’s “Traditions of Hawaii,” 1870.

Ka Moolelo Hawaii.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:—

Please carry before all of the experts this bit of the “Moolelo Hawaii” which I saw from the selections of John Zibilina Kahoalii. All of the the classes of the Chiefly Histories have been laid out properly from top to bottom, with  the lineages of each class.

Class 1. Ihu Hai [? Iku Hai] is the name of the class.
Ihu Nua [? Iku Nuu] is the second name.
Both names describe this one class; the line of this Class is shown by its Lineage.

Class 2. Ihu Laa [? Iku Laa] is the name, with its Lineage.

Class 3. Ihu Lani [? Iku Lani] is the name, with its Lineage.

Class 4. The Alii Laa is the name of that Class, the lowest Class, according to just what I think. Continue reading

Hauoli La Hanau, e Mary Kawena Pukui! 1964.

Isle Scholar Celebrates Birthday With New Work

By MARY COOKE

Mary Kawena Pukui, dean of Hawaiian scholars, has two reasons to celebrate today.

It’s her 69th birthday, and the English-Hawaiian Dictionary, part of a project for which she started the research 30 years ago, is just out.

It is a companion volume of the Hawaiian-English Dictionary published in 1957. On both works her collaborator was Dr. Samuel H. Elbert of the University of Hawaii who studied the language with her. Both were published by the University Press.

“IT IS such a relief,” Kawena began in the light, unhurried conversational tones of a Hawaiian tutu, “to have the dictionaries finished.”

But her dark eyes sparkled with the intensity of the scholar as she added, “now I can go ahead with the Kamakau.”

She explained that some years ago she translated the writings on Hawaiian religion, arts and crafts by the early Hawaiian author, Samuel Kamakau. Now she is reviewing the work for publication with Dorothy Barrere of the Bishop Museum.

“AND THERE are lots of other things I want to do, too,” she said with characteristic forward-looking zeal.

Kawena is modest about looking backward. But the record shows 40 years of persistent, scholarly accomplishment as researcher, translator, compiler and writer of authentic Hawaiiana.

Thirty-seven titles in Bishop Museum listings covering ethnology, sociology, natural history and linguistics are the work of Mary Pukui alone or in collaboration with scientists and other writers.

HER MOTIVATION is the urgency she feels to research and record all possible knowledge of the indigenous culture of Hawaii.

When she began writing and translating years ago she started a card file of Hawaiian words “for whoever would do a new Hawaiian dictionary… I never thought I was going to be the one to do it,” she said.

Her source material was Hawaiian newspapers and magazines, the Hawaiian Bible, catechisms and religious writings of all denominations, legends, folk lore, chants and writings of early native scholars.

Legal terms and land law terms were translated, and from the modern Hawaiian vocabulary, such contemporary words as “air raid” and “blackout” were also included.

KAWENA, with Eleanor Williamson of the Bishop Museum, also traveled remote areas of the Islands with a tape recorder to garner all she could from living memories about pronunciation and meanings of words.

She says the Hawaiian language frequently is complicated by multiple meanings.

Advertiser Photo by Charles Okamura

MARY KAWENA PUKUI Continue reading

Kalaniopuu’s fame as told by S. M. Kamakau, 1867.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O KAMEHAMEHA I.”]

He nui ka poe kaulana i ke au o Kalaniopuu, a ua kaulana oia no kona puni kaua a me ka luku a me ka paia i na makaainana a me na kamalii opiopio—he makua aloha ole i na makaainana.

There were many famous ones during the era of Kalaniopuu, and he himself was well known, as someone who loved war, and massacring, and the striking of the makaainana and small children—he was a father who had no aloha for the makaainana.

[Although Kamakau describes many a chief as “war loving,” he describes Kalaniopuu as particularly cruel. This passage can be found in “Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii,” page 115.]

(Kuokoa, 2/23/1867, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 8, Aoao 1. Feberuari 23, 1867.

Some of the battles of Kalaniopuu, 1866.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I.”]

The battles between Kalaniopuu, the King of Hawaii, with Kahekili, the King of Maui.

The years 1775, 1776, 1777, 1778, and 1778. Kalaniopuu went to war at Kaupo on Maui, with his Alii, his war Officers, and his soldiers. Kalaniopuu first went to war at Kaupo, and he tortured the makaainana of Kaupo by clubbing their foreheads with his war club [newa]. This battle was called Kalaehohoa [“Clubbing-of-the-Forehead”] Continue reading