S. M. Kamakau on Capt. James Cook, 1867.

[Found under: “Ia Ioane Kaimiola.”]

If we consider the history of Captain Cook from the start to the end, I do not come out with a flawless name or a good name for him. If there is built a Memorial to Kalanimanookahoowaha for his killing of the destructive scamp Captain Cook, that would be something most appropriate.

[This is from a  lengthy detailed response to a critique by Ioane Kaimiola (“S. M. Kamakau.” in Au Okoa, 3/18/1867, p. 1) of Kamakau’s portrayal of Cook.]

(Kuokoa, 4/6/1867, p. 4)

Kuokoa_4_6_1867_4

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 14, Aoao 4. Aperila 6, 1867.

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150 years ago, people were reading about the arrival of Catholicism, in S. M. Kamakau’s great history, 1869.

THE HISTORY OF HAWAII.

By S. M. Kamakau.

NUMBER 97.

Pertaining to the Reign of Kauikeaouli over the Nation, he being called Kamehameha III.

Pertaining to the arrival of Catholicism, in the year 1827 [1837].

In the month of September, in the year 1836. A Catholic priest [kahuna katolika Roma] arrived, the Rev. Aresaniao R. Walsh [Rev. Arsenius Robert Walsh], from Britain. He were not expelled, but was forbidden by the Chiefs, that he should not proselytize amongst the Hawaiians. But he went and argued with some Protestant priests [Kahuna Hoole Pope]. He indeed converted Hawaiians and secretly Baptized some people. Continue reading

“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

Plagiarism? 1868.

The History of S. M. Kamakau.

Aloha no.—These past Saturdays I saw within Whitney’s newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] them calling the haole government paper [Hawaiian Gazette], a thief, because of the translation of the History of S. M. Kamakau, into the English language, and for inserting it within some past issues of that newspaper. In my opinion, those pebbles pelted in contempt are not right at all. Continue reading