Where are R. Kapihe’s critiques of Kamakau? 1868.

S. M. Kamakau seems to write two Hawaiian language articles responding to R. Kapihe’s critiques. The first one, “He papa hulikoa; he alukakoa; he ahikahalelo, he iliohalawaena,” appears in Au Okoa on 7/23/1868, p. 3. Kamakau says he is responding to a letter from R. Kapihe of perhaps Kailua, Koolaupoko, that appears “on the 16th of this month.” He responds to a number of  criticisms that appeared in Kapihe’s letter about Kamakau’s history of Kamehamehas. Continue reading

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Critique of S. M. Kamakau by “A Hawaiian,” 1868.

History of Kamehameha.

Mr. Editor:—I see that you have taken up S. M. Kamakau’s “History of the Kamehamehas,” published in the Kuokoa. It was intended by Kamakau to take the place of a work on the same subject commenced some time ago but never finished. Continue reading

S. M. Kamakau on history, 1868.

Letter from Mr. Kamakau.

To all Literary Gentlemen and Friends in Hawaii and elsewhere:

A certain person, styling himself in the Gazette, “A Hawaiian,” and whom I judge to be the same who signs himself in the Au Okoa “R. Kapihe,” and who, moreover, I doubt not,is one aspiring to a very high rank in the Kingdom, seems very jealous of my statements in the Hawaiian History which I am now writing. The line of descent of some of the present high chiefs, and their relationship to Kamehameha I, as I have stated it, appears to find especial disfavor in his eyes, perhaps and very probably, for the reason that another name very near at home to the above-mentioned writer is not included among those whom I have written down as descendants and near of kin to Kamehameha I. Continue reading

S. M. Kamakau on Capt. James Cook, 1867.

[Found under: “Ia Ioane Kaimiola.”]

If we consider the history of Captain Cook from the start to the end, I do not come out with a flawless name or a good name for him. If there is built a Memorial to Kalanimanookahoowaha for his killing of the destructive scamp Captain Cook, that would be something most appropriate.

[This is from a  lengthy detailed response to a critique by Ioane Kaimiola (“S. M. Kamakau.” in Au Okoa, 3/18/1867, p. 1) of Kamakau’s portrayal of Cook.]

(Kuokoa, 4/6/1867, p. 4)

Kuokoa_4_6_1867_4

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 14, Aoao 4. Aperila 6, 1867.

150 years ago, people were reading about the arrival of Catholicism, in S. M. Kamakau’s great history, 1869.

THE HISTORY OF HAWAII.

By S. M. Kamakau.

NUMBER 97.

Pertaining to the Reign of Kauikeaouli over the Nation, he being called Kamehameha III.

Pertaining to the arrival of Catholicism, in the year 1827 [1837].

In the month of September, in the year 1836. A Catholic priest [kahuna katolika Roma] arrived, the Rev. Aresaniao R. Walsh [Rev. Arsenius Robert Walsh], from Britain. He were not expelled, but was forbidden by the Chiefs, that he should not proselytize amongst the Hawaiians. But he went and argued with some Protestant priests [Kahuna Hoole Pope]. He indeed converted Hawaiians and secretly Baptized some people. Continue reading