More on Kamakau’s history, 1868.

History of Kamehameha.—A communication from Mr. Kamakau, the author of the History of Kamehameha, now in the course of publication in the Kuokoa, will be found in our columns. Continue reading

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“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

Plagiarism? 1868.

The History of S. M. Kamakau.

Aloha no.—These past Saturdays I saw within Whitney’s newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] them calling the haole government paper [Hawaiian Gazette], a thief, because of the translation of the History of S. M. Kamakau, into the English language, and for inserting it within some past issues of that newspaper. In my opinion, those pebbles pelted in contempt are not right at all. Continue reading

Stephen Reynolds was in Honolulu while Kamehameha II lived there, 1868.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O NA KAMEHAMEHA.”]

When King Liholiho resided in Honolulu, there was an increase of haole living in Honolulu at that time; some were of high standing, some were ship captains, some were traders, and some had shops. The haole living there at the time were: Jones Aluli, Mister Parker [Mikapako], Stephen Reynolds [Lanai], Continue reading

Pass down the moolelo! 2017.

What are we doing today to carry on the legacy of that writer of moolelo? Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau and his fellow scholars at Lahainaluna were taught to do research and to write down and teach the moolelo of their people.

He says in a response to a critique that alii genealogy was very kapu and was not to be given to anyone else except their own children, “In my opinion, should Kauakahiakaola folks, the genealogists, arise from the realm of po, they will rejoice in this [my telling of chiefly genealogies], for it is gone with them, and they would be happy to see it once more.” (“He wahi ai no ka Nonanona…” Nonanona, 2/14/1843, p. 92)

Pass down the moolelo you do know to the next generation, whether they be family moolelo, or otherwise. Learn more moolelo. Pass them down.

Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau, ke kakau moolelo, in his early days, 1845.

SOME ANCIENT MATTERS OF HAWAII NEI.

Lahainaluna, Dec. 10, 1845

When the islands of Hawaii were created by Kumuhonua and his wife Haloiho; when Kumuhonua slept and rose from his sleep, the earth turned and the shaking was called an earthquake [olai].

At that time, the duties were not divided, and names were not given to the many things.

Therefore all things were clarified, animals, birds, crawling things, things with wings that flew in the sky, and men.

Each thing was given its duty, and the duties were clearly divided, appropriate for each living being and the things without the breath of life; this distribution of duties was done at Umauma in Hilo Paliku.

After lands were handed out, along came Halo, who stood beside the river and asked for land for himself. “I want land for myself,” he said to the one giving out land; “You have come when all the land was given out, and there is only one land left.” “Where?” “The polapilau.” “That is my land,” and that land became the land of Halo; completed was the giving of land to those with the breath of life and without the breath of life.

At Molea in Hamakua, that is the place where all the fish of the ocean gathered, the large fish and tiny fish; it was there that all the fish were marked; the stripped ones, the red ones, the white one, the yellow ones, all the different ones in the sea; Kapuhili was the head of those who did the marking; upon all of the unmarked fish, ash was strewn and they became spotted.

All the fishes of the ocean were given its name.

Kumuhonua was the first man, and Haloiho was the first woman. The gods were Ku and Lono.

When Lono (Captain Cook) landed in Hawaii nei. The men went aboard the ship and spoke Hawaiian to the haole; the haole however did not listen to what was spoken; therefore the haole spoke in their language, refusing, without listening. “No more;” so the Hawaiians clarified, “Molea is kapu,” “no more,” “Molea at Hamakua is kapu,” and the haole nodded without under-…

(Elele, 2/10/1846, p. 179)

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Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 23, Aoao 179. Feberuari 10,  1846.

It wasn’t only Kaʻū that dispatched oppressive aliʻi, 1865.

[Found under: KA MOOLELO O HAWAII NEI. HELU 14.]

During the period of Lonoikamakahiki, a section went to his older brother, Kanaloakuaana; Kona, Kohala, and Hamakua were ruled by Kanaloakuaana. Kau, Puna, and Hilo were ruled by Lonoikamakahiki.

There were many chiefs of Hawaii [island] who were warring, and there were many alii that were killed by the makaainana for their tyranny and for plundering the belongings of the makaainana. Continue reading