On Kalaipahoa, 1931.

POISON GOD BURNED

Hilo, Hawaii, July 6, 1931.

Editor, The Star-Bulletin.

Sir: In your issue of July 4, 1931, there appears a picture of an old Hawaiian wooden idol  under which it was stated that it was believed to be the poison-god Kalaipahoa. Continue reading

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Population decline, 1835.

ON THE DECLINE IN POPULATION.

Waioli, Kauai, 1835.

I read the Kumu Hawaii, pepa 18, on page 140, and I thought, while we are in the midst of life, we live in the midst of death. Our friends die on our right hand, and on our left. Death is victorious over children, and elderly; over the young, and the aged. Strength cannot ward it off; it cannot be escaped through wealth nor skill. Continue reading

Kaumualii’s mahiole fetches a mere $120 at auction, 1873.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Antiquities of Hawaii nei.—At 10 o’clock in the morning of this past Saturday, Mar. 8, the valuables of old Hawaii which were advertised earlier were auctioned off by E. P. Adams. The house was filled with all sorts of people, and some objects went for high bids. The feather mahiole of Kaumualii went for the price of $120. This headdress went for a very low price; it is believed that never again will there be available a mahiole of that kind. The care given to all of the objects by the mother who has passed [Mrs. Whitney] was very good.

(Kuokoa, 3/22/1873, p. 3)

Na mea kahiko o Hawaii nei...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XII, Helu 12, Aoao 3. Maraki 22, 1873.

On Kaumualii and Kaahumanu, 1880.

[From: “Ka Moolelo o Kaahumanu”]

Kaahumanu was one of them who made a circuit of Maui, Oahu, and Kauai with Liholiho. When Kaahumanu arrived on Kauai, she took Kaumualii, the alii of Kauai, as a kane [husband] for herself. When Liholiho returned to Oahu, it was with Haakulou, the woman of Kaumualii; because Liholiho took Haakulou as a wahine [wife] for himself, along with his other wahine.

Kaahumanu lived on Kauai along with Kaumualii in the year 1822. Perhaps in the month of August.

Kaahumanu wanted to seek out Nihoa. It was the very first time that Nihoa was found, that tiny island to the North-West of Niihau. Continue reading

The name of Kaumualii’s mahiole, 1906.

[Excerpt from: “He Moolelo no Kamehameha I. Ka Na’i Aupuni Hawaii.” by Hooulumahiehie.]

After these words of Kamehameha’s were over, he then took his mahiole, Koki, from a basket and placed it upon the head of Kaumualii. Kamehameha removed his royal malo and so too did Kaumualii remove his malo, and they exchanged them with each other.

[This account is from the meeting of Kamehameha and Kaumualii. It is just a tiny excerpt of the kind of awesome information available in the story of Kamehameha I translated by Kamaoli Kuwada, Emalani Case, and Beau Bassett, slated to come out from Kamehameha Publishing. I can’t wait.

I was informed that this priceless feathered object from the past is indeed being cared for amongst the many other antiquities at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum.]

(Na’i Aupuni, 9/14/1906, p. 1)

HE MOOLELO NO KAMEHAMEHA I.

Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke II, Helu 88, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 14, 1906.

Kaumualii’s Mahiole, 1873.

It is the Feather Helmet of Kaumualii!—During the days of this past week, displayed in the window of Whitney’s Bookstore the regalia of the Ancient Kings of Hawaii nei. The Mahiole is Kaumualii’s, the last King of Kauai. Mrs. Whitney [Wini] the elder who just passed was the one who was taking care of the mahiole, and it is one of the things remaining today of the beautiful works of the people of old. We praise the fine upkeep by the beloved missionary mother who passed, for on display, it seemed as if it was made yesterday; the feathers appeared new. On the sides of the mahiole were red feathers taken from the Iiwi polena, and feathers of the maha Oo are on top of the mahiole from this side to that of the crest. This should definitely be kept in the Hawaiian Museum. We believe that it is 60 years old.

[It is interesting to note what is not said in a similar article in English.]

(Au Okoa, 2/27/1873, p. 3)

O ka Mahiole ka o Kaumualii!

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VIII, Helu 46, Aoao 3. Feberuari 27, 1873.