Kalaniopuu’s ahuula and mahiole, the latests, 2020.

Feather Cloak and Helmet Gifted to Captain Cook to Return Permanently to Hawaiʻi

Honolulu, Hawaiʻi—An ʻahu ʻula (feather cloak) and mahiole (feather helmet) gifted to Captain Cook in 1779 are being permanently returned to Hawaiʻi by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

These cherished items were gifts from Hawaiian Chief Kalaniʻōpuʻu to Captain James Cook and have been in Te Papa’s collection since being gifted to the museum in 1912.

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The meeting of Kalaniopuu and Cook, 1867.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O KAMEHAMEHA I.”]

The Era of Kalaniopuu, 1779. Pertaining to the Death of Captain Cook, that is Lono.

On the 24th of January, Kalaniopuu and his warriors returned from Maui and landed at Awili in Kaawaloa, and stayed at Hanamua at Keaweaheulu’s place, but they were also on Maui at war with Kahekili.

Kalaniopuu saw the many women were at the ocean on the ship to prostitute themselves [hookamakama], so Kalaniopuu forbade women from going down to the ship. And the haole saw that the women were not coming to the ship, so the haole went into the uplands of Napoopoo and at Kahauloa, and on this side of Kaawaloa to solicit prostitution, and the women received a great amount of foreign rubbish [opala]. Continue reading

More on Kalaniopuu’s ahuula and mahiole, 1887.

Captain Cook Relics.

Speaking of the Captain Cook relics which have been secured for the New South Wales Government, our London correspondent says, writing on September 9:—”Sir Saul Samuel has secured for the New South Wales Government the whole of the interesting collection of Captain Cook’s relics which were on view at the late Colonial and Indian Exhibition. Some of them he has had to purchase, others have been presented as gift. Your…

(Sydney Mail, 10/22/1887, p. 868)

SydneyMail_10_22_1887_868

The Sydney Mail, Volume XLIV, Number 1424, Page 868. October 22, 1887.

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Queen Liliuokalani attends historical play at Kapiolani Park, 1916.

THE PRESENTATION AT KAPIOLANI PARK ABOUT LONOIKAMAKAHIKI AND KAIKILANI WAS BEAUTIFUL

SOME SCENES THAT WERE SHOWN—(1) Kakuhihewa, King of Oahu. (2) The Alii and Kaukau Alii of King Lonoikamakahiki of Hawaii leaving the throne. (3) King Lonoikamakahiki. (4) The Chiefs and Attendants in the Procession. (5) Queen Liliuokalani, and Her Companions watching the Performance. (6) The Attendants of Queen Kaikilani. (7) The Retainers of Queen Kaikilani. Continue reading

Kalaniopuu’s ahuula and mahiole that he placed on Cook, 1779 / 2016.

I just put up the short excerpt the other day describing Kalaniopuu giving James Cook his ahuula and kahili. And now there is this exciting announcement from the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum!

he-nae-akea

[It should be perhaps made clear however that the ahuula at least has made its way back to Hawaii nei two times since 1779, courtesy of the Dominion Museum, the predecessor of Te Papa Tongarewa]. The first time was in 1960:

DOMINION MUSEUM FEATHER CLOAK

Each year the Museum attempts to bring back for the Aloha Week exhibit a fine example of Hawaiian featherwork from abroad. This year the Dominion Museum of Wellington, New Zealand, has generously loaned a large Hawaiian feather cloak, which to the best of our knowledge, was presented to Captain Cook’s expedition in 1779. Aloha Week marks the first return of this cloak to Hawaii.

(Conch Shell: News of the Bishop Museum, October 1960)

The second time was for the “Artificial Curiosities” exhibit at the Bishop Museum which ran from January 18 to August 31, 1978.

Also, check out this previous post on an amazing story about other featherwork given to Cook by Kalaniopuu!

Kaumualii’s mahiole fetches a mere $120 at auction, 1873.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Antiquities of Hawaii nei.—At 10 o’clock in the morning of this past Saturday, Mar. 8, the valuables of old Hawaii which were advertised earlier were auctioned off by E. P. Adams. The house was filled with all sorts of people, and some objects went for high bids. The feather mahiole of Kaumualii went for the price of $120. This headdress went for a very low price; it is believed that never again will there be available a mahiole of that kind. The care given to all of the objects by the mother who has passed [Mrs. Whitney] was very good.

(Kuokoa, 3/22/1873, p. 3)

Na mea kahiko o Hawaii nei...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XII, Helu 12, Aoao 3. Maraki 22, 1873.

The name of Kaumualii’s mahiole, 1906.

[Excerpt from: “He Moolelo no Kamehameha I. Ka Na’i Aupuni Hawaii.” by Hooulumahiehie.]

After these words of Kamehameha’s were over, he then took his mahiole, Koki, from a basket and placed it upon the head of Kaumualii. Kamehameha removed his royal malo and so too did Kaumualii remove his malo, and they exchanged them with each other.

[This account is from the meeting of Kamehameha and Kaumualii. It is just a tiny excerpt of the kind of awesome information available in the story of Kamehameha I translated by Kamaoli Kuwada, Emalani Case, and Beau Bassett, slated to come out from Kamehameha Publishing. I can’t wait.

I was informed that this priceless feathered object from the past is indeed being cared for amongst the many other antiquities at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum.]

(Na’i Aupuni, 9/14/1906, p. 1)

HE MOOLELO NO KAMEHAMEHA I.

Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke II, Helu 88, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 14, 1906.

Kaumualii’s Mahiole, 1873.

It is the Feather Helmet of Kaumualii!—During the days of this past week, displayed in the window of Whitney’s Bookstore the regalia of the Ancient Kings of Hawaii nei. The Mahiole is Kaumualii’s, the last King of Kauai. Mrs. Whitney [Wini] the elder who just passed was the one who was taking care of the mahiole, and it is one of the things remaining today of the beautiful works of the people of old. We praise the fine upkeep by the beloved missionary mother who passed, for on display, it seemed as if it was made yesterday; the feathers appeared new. On the sides of the mahiole were red feathers taken from the Iiwi polena, and feathers of the maha Oo are on top of the mahiole from this side to that of the crest. This should definitely be kept in the Hawaiian Museum. We believe that it is 60 years old.

[It is interesting to note what is not said in a similar article in English.]

(Au Okoa, 2/27/1873, p. 3)

O ka Mahiole ka o Kaumualii!

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VIII, Helu 46, Aoao 3. Feberuari 27, 1873.

More on auction of Kauai treasures, 1873.

A REAL CURIOSITY.—We noticed in the window of Whitney’s Bookstore recently, a real curiosity of the olden time, being the feather helmet (mahi-ole) of Kaumualii, the last King of Kauai. It is a very rare specimen of the ancient handiwork of these Islands, and ought to be purchased by the government, for the museum for the establishment of which the Legislature made a provision last summer.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 2/22/1873, p. 3)

A Real Curiosity.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVII, Number 34, Page 3. February 22, 1873.

Reenactment of Kamehameha’s landing on Oahu, 1913.

GREAT PERFORMANCE OF THE LANDING OF KAMEHAMEHA

Some people of Hawaii of these new generations have committed to memory the arrival of Kamehameha the Great to Oahu and his landing in Waikiki, without however having witnessed it; today, at ten in the morning, it will be seen in Waikiki a scene very similar to that arrival of the war canoes of Kamehameha with the greatly distinguished King Kamehameha the Great sitting aboard his double-hulled canoes [waa kaulua] along with his war leaders, the chiefs, and warriors supplied with war implements of all sorts; King Kamehameha is adorned with a feather helmet [mahiole] and feather cloak [ahuula] along with a barbed spear [ihe laumeki] in his hand.

This is the first show of this type done here on Oahu; there was not one from the beginning; therefore, it is something new worth going to.  The preparations for and supervising of this great work is under John Wise, one of the people of this time that has memorized the history of Hawaii and the way of life of the people of old.

From amongst the waa that are being brought to show this day, is one of the huge, old waa; it is said that it belonged to Kamehameha the Great and is being brought from Kailua, Hawaii, from the estate of Prince Kalanianaole. It is said that this a huge and deep canoe, and the depth reaches the waste, and it is something new to see a huge waa of the old times being used these days.

(Kuokoa, 2/21/1913, p. 5)

KA HOIKEIKE NUI NO KA PAE ANA MAI O KAMEHAMEHA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke L, Helu 8, Aoao 5. Feberuari 21, 1913.