Mele reworked, 1918.

HOOHENO NA KA HAE AMERIKA

Ia oe e ka la e alohi nei,
Ma na welelau a o ka honua,
Hoike mai oe i kou nani,
O ka hae aloha o Amerika; Continue reading

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Francis Ii Brown honored with the French Croix de Guerre, 1918.

THAT HAWAIIAN BOY WAS HONORED.

News was received from Paris, and written by him to his elder brother in Honolulu, about the French Nation giving the “Cross of War” to Francis Ii Brown, one of the children of Mrs. Irene Kahalelaukoa Holloway, and the reason he received this “Cross of War” was because of an act of bravery done; this Hawaiian Boy did not inform his elder brother in Honolulu in his letter the reason that he received this “Cross of War,” but it is clear that this “Cross,” was received because of an act of bravery he carried out. Continue reading

Hawaiian translation of A. F. Grant’s “Loyal Ned on the last cruise of the Alabama,” 1888.

NED NIXON

the

Steel-Hearted and the Unforgettable Executor of Orders;

and the

The Final Siege

of the

“ALABAMA,”

the

Fierce Fighter and Fire Breather of the Atlantic Ocean.

“There are two wondrous ones of the sea,
Feared by the Whalers;
The Alabama and the Shenandoah,
Chasing in the distance.” Continue reading

When will the women of Hawaii gain suffrage? 1917.

WOMEN WILL BE ALLOWED TO VOTE

London, May 22—Before the onset of this frightening war in Europe, in England there was great opposition to the wish of women to have the right to vote; but today, there is consideration to give British women in England voting rights, and there is a bill before the British Parliament to give suffrage to women. Continue reading

Commemorating Hawaii’s role in WWI, 1919.

THIS IS THE STATUE SCULPTED BY BURNHAM TO COMMEMORATE THE MILITARY SERVICE OF HAWAIIANS IN THE WAR.

In the middle is the commemorative statue for Hawaii’s part it took in the war that was sculpted by the sculptor Roger Noble Burnham. This is that statue that is intended to be placed outside of Kapiolani Park in the area set aside for it by the legislature.

This is the Memorial that Hawaii wanted to stand for all times, something for the people to look upon. On one side of the sculpture is a war leader, and on the other side, a Hawaiian girl. Beneath this is a soldier on one side and a sailor on the other side.

(Kuokoa, 5/16/1919, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 20, Aoao 1. Mei 16, 1919.

One year after Pearl Harbor, 1942.

This Makes a Full Year

Monday last was a year since the bombing of Puuloa by the those who carried out the coup and stole the lives of people thinking that is what will give them victory.

The 7th of December is a day we probably will never forget for all times, for while the navy and the land of America were enjoying their time, the raider carried out his work which was planned ahead of time, to fly to America to the path of Puuloa, and let down messengers of destruction to cripple the condition of the military of the United States of America.

With America being secretly attacked, that served as a needle poking at the side of the Americans like a spur [kui ke-pa] being thrust into the underside of a horse.

In response to these actions by the raider and assassin, the one who stirred the coals that are burning in the hearts of true Americans, and it became something that inflamed the thoughts of Americans. Continue reading

Less than four months before Pearl Harbor, 1941.

Shadow of War Spreads Over the Pacific

With Japanese troops reported invading southern Indo-China and threatening Thailand (1), better known as Siam, American naval officials engage in a last-minute checkup of the great Hawaiian Naval base at Pearl Harbor (2). This map shows the areas controoled by the U. S., Britain and Russia, which are cooperating in the war on Fascism, and by Japan.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 8/20/1941, p. 6)

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The Star of Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 17, Page 6. August 20, 1941.