Hawaiian sailors, victims of the Shenandoah, 1865.

Alas for the Hawaiian Sailors.

This past Thursday, a Whaling Ship came in, with some men from the ships that were captured by the ship Shenandoah [Kenadoa]. It brought the victims of the ships which were burned. They were 52 in total, and four of them were taken to the Hospital. These are their names: Continue reading

Victims of the Shenandoah, 1865.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

The ship Kamehameha V.—This last Saturday, the 19th, the three-masted ship, Kamehameha V was sent to retrieve the Hawaiians who are on Ponape, they being those who were on the ships that were set afire by the ship Shenandoah [Kenakoa]. Continue reading

Meanwhile, the president of the USA is echoing words from the past, 1942.

OUST THE JAPS

We are rapidly getting all of the 500,000 Japanese away from our Pacific coast danger zone, but what about the timewhen the war is over?

A resident from the Lake Labish district told the editor of the Greater Oregon yesterday of a series of raids conducted on Jap farms in that district. We are not at liberty to tell the full story but we can say that many machine guns were found in hay mows and in straw stacks and that a large amount of ammunition and weapons was taken from the Japs, who profess to be so friendly to us and so sorry that Japan has declared war upon us. Continue reading

Francis Ii Brown honored with the French Croix de Guerre, 1918.

THAT HAWAIIAN BOY WAS HONORED.

News was received from Paris, and written by him to his elder brother in Honolulu, about the French Nation giving the “Cross of War” to Francis Ii Brown, one of the children of Mrs. Irene Kahalelaukoa Holloway, and the reason he received this “Cross of War” was because of an act of bravery done; this Hawaiian Boy did not inform his elder brother in Honolulu in his letter the reason that he received this “Cross of War,” but it is clear that this “Cross,” was received because of an act of bravery he carried out. Continue reading

Hawaiian translation of A. F. Grant’s “Loyal Ned on the last cruise of the Alabama,” 1888.

NED NIXON

the

Steel-Hearted and the Unforgettable Executor of Orders;

and the

The Final Siege

of the

“ALABAMA,”

the

Fierce Fighter and Fire Breather of the Atlantic Ocean.

“There are two wondrous ones of the sea,
Feared by the Whalers;
The Alabama and the Shenandoah,
Chasing in the distance.” Continue reading