Hawaiian sailors, victims of the Shenandoah, 1865.

Alas for the Hawaiian Sailors.

This past Thursday, a Whaling Ship came in, with some men from the ships that were captured by the ship Shenandoah [Kenadoa]. It brought the victims of the ships which were burned. They were 52 in total, and four of them were taken to the Hospital. These are their names: Continue reading

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Death of Mary Ann Kaaumokulani Kinoole Pitman Ailau, 1905.

DIED.

AILAU—In Hilo, Hawaii. February 11, 1905. Mrs. Mary Ann Kaaumokulani Kinoole Pitman Ailau, daughter of the High Chiefess Kinoole and the late Benjamin Pitman, and widow of John Keakaokalani Ailau, aged 67 years.

Mrs. Ailau was known from one end of the group to the other, and in Boston and many of the Atlantic watering places.

She was born at Hilo 67 years ago, and with the exception of a number of years spent in Boston and New England completing her education, she always resided in the islands. She was a daughter of Benjamin Pitman a capitalist, who resided both in Hilo and Honolulu. The Pitman home was at the corner of Alakea and Beretania streets, on the site now occupied by the C. Q. Yee Hop building.

The Pitmans came here from Boston, where they were well connected. Mrs. Ailau’s father-in-law also resided here for a number of years. Her father married the High Chiefess Kinoole, daughter of the High Chief Hoolulu. Continue reading

Decoration Day, 1909.

“DAY TO STREW FLOWERS”

As has been the custom in previous years, that is the observation of memorial day [la lupua], the town is similarly decorating the graves of their loved ones with flowers of every type, and the cemeteries of the many who have passed are truly beautiful to see.

The 30th of May has been taken as a day to “strew flowers,” being that it is the month in which many flowers are seen, and also it is the final day the soldiers served as soldiers in the great war [kaua huliamahi].

The number of the [national] cemeteries in the different States of the United States, for the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their land, is about seventy-seven, and within them they hold about four-hundred fifty thousand bodies. It is for them that the day is set aside; it is a time for the living to show their loving remembrances for those who bore suffering for the welfare of the people who enjoy the rights and blessings for which they sought after.

In the year 1882, the parades and speeches for those who died on the battlefields were initiated, and that is what happened this past Monday by the soldiers of this town.

Taking the words of General John B. Gordon, “It is impossible for us who are today joyful, to deny the truth of these things, that being, those who are living should be as true brothers of those people who suffered injuries for the blessings of this land. They stood and fought for the righteousness of the law and for independence, and that is how this generation then should remain and defend the very same right, continually pushing America on higher in all areas of progress.”

(Kuokoa, 6/9/1909, p. 4)

KA LA LUPUA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 23, Aoao 4. Iune 9, 1909.