Remembering, 1909.

PARADE COMMEMORATED ON MEMORIAL DAY

Because Memorial Day [ka la Lu Pua] fell on this Sunday, therefore the parade was postponed until the following Monday; there were not that many people who went to watch the events of the day.

If this Monday was the actual Memorial Day, then there would have been a lot of spectators; such as by strewing flowers on graves and then return and watch the parade as they marched up for Maemae Cemetery. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

Death of Sam P. Lohiau of Okoe, 1905.

This made me think back to Kamuela Kumukahi.

nupepa

Great Sorrow!

My favorite Aloha Aina, allow me some space. At 3 o’clock in the afternoon, this past Friday the 26th of May, the breath of my dear Sam P. Lohiau. He was born from the loins of Mr. and Mrs. Kawaa Lohiau, at Okoe, South Kona, and it is the sister of his mother who is writing. He entered Lahainaluna School in the year 1900, and in this coming July he was to graduate from that school.

View original post 199 more words

What a disappointment, 1867.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Huikau.”]

It will not be seen after all.—We reported in Issue 4 of our Newspaper, “the moon will be eclipsed o n the 13th of September, and it will be seen here in Hawaii.” The Famous School Teacher of Punahou proclaimed to us that the moon will indeed be eclipsed on that day, Continue reading

Fanny Thomas Gulick dies in Kobe, Japan, 1883.

MRS. FANNY T. GULICK.

From the latest news received last week we hear that Mrs. F. T. Gulika has died, the wife of Rev. J. P. Gulika, one of the old teachers who brought righteousness to this Archipelago. Our readers will perhaps not have forgotten the Gulick family in Hawaii nei, and the departure of the two in their old and weak days to go to Japan to live with their children. Continue reading

In less than 10 years Old Oakum is just a character with half a name, 1906.

Old Oakum, a Character in Honolulu Long Ago

“Old Oakum” was one of the odd characters of Honolulu u to about thirty years ago. He was a harmless creature whose one talent was that of collecting honey from bee trees without being stung. Where he came from or was born, or just what his nationality was, were matters not well known, for “Old Oakum” seemed to have forgotten all about himself long before coming to Honolulu which must have been in the early 50s. Continue reading

More on bees and the man known to Hawaiians as Okamu haole, 1897.

An Industry That Has Made Rapid Strides.

It would be a difficult thing to fix the date of the beginning of the bee industry in the Hawaiian Islands. As far back as the “oldest inhabitant” can run his thoughts, honey has been gathered in the mountains. Back in the ’60s one of the characters of the city was Dwight Holcomb, known to the small boys and natives as “Old Oakum.” He was an eccentric individual and was the “bogie man” to the young boys of that time. Continue reading