La Hoihoi Ea celebration, 1863.

Restoration Day.—The public has heard that the people of Honolulu are putting on a banquet for the day that the Hawaiian Flag was returned, and the alii of the land are kindly assisting in this endeavor taken up by their people. All friends should look and understand the Announcement published in today’s paper; Continue reading

Announcement to the Kaahumanu Society, 1920.

KA AHAHUI KAAHUMANU.

All members of this society are requested to gather at Aala Park in the afternoon of Thursday, April 15, 1920, between the hours of 1 p. m. and 2 p. m., to join in the parade to celebrate and commemorate the century since the landing of the missionaries in Hawaii nei. Continue reading

100 years a hundred years ago! 1919.

FOUR HISTORIC FLOATS IN KAMEHAMEHA CENTENARY PARADES TO ILLUSTRATE CHIEF INCIDENTS IN LIFE

Members of Kamehameha Centenary Commission

Initial Exercises of Observance Will Commence Tomorrow Morning in Kawaiahao Church

KAMEHAMEHA CENTENARY PROGRAM

Sunday, June 8, 11 a. m.—Centenary services under auspices of Kamehameha lodge.

Tuesday, June 10, 7:30 p. m.—Centenary procession, Aala park to capitol via King street; tableau, music, Hawaiian hulas, at capitol after parade.

Wednesday, June 11, 9:30 a. m.—Centenary Kamehameha day procession, participated in by Hawaiian societies and individuals, Aala park to Kamehameha statue and capitol.

Wednesday, June 11, 8 p. m.—Historic Hawaiian pageant, floats, pa-u riders, etc., in Territorial fair grounds. Continue reading

Veterans Day in Hilo Town, 1940.

THE DAY THE WAR CAME TO AN END WILL BE COMMEMORATED

Monday, November 11, is the day that commemorates the end of the War. It will be remembered here in Hilo with a great parade, beginning at 9 a.m.

There will be two bands, the Hawaii County Band [Bana Kalana o Hawaii] and the navy band will join in the parade. So too will the American Legion [Legiona Amelika], the Women’s Legion [Legiona o na Wahine], the Boy and Girl Scouts [Puali Kiai o na Keikikane ame Kaikamahine], and some other organizations. Continue reading

Pāʻū riding a hundred ten years ago and more, 1906.

PA-U PARADE ON MONDAY

The Riders Expect to Have a Very Big Turnout.

The Association of Pa-u Riders, otherwise known as the Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii, is making great preparations for its parade of Pa-u riders on Monday, June 11. This society formed by Mrs. Kaimana [Kainana] Puahi and others interested in the preservation of the old Hawaiian manner of horseback riding with the picturesque pa-u immediately following the floral parade of Washington’s birthday, of which parade the pa-u riders formed one of the most attractive features. The ladies have since devoted much time to practice, and to the making of appropriate dresses, and have been helped by the members of the Promotion Committee, by Manager Charles Crane of the Hawaiian Gazette Co. and by many others, to all of whom the members of the Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii wish to return their most sincere thanks.

OBSERVATIONS OF THE DAY.

The program for the day is most complete. At 6:30 in the morning, the members of the hui will meet at the Waikiki residence of Mrs. Puahi, at which time all will don the pa-u. At eight o’clock the line will begin to form, Sheriff A. M. Brown being the marshal of the parade. At 8:30 the procession will move to the Kapahulu road, thence to Beretania street, thence to Washington place. Continue reading

Pāʻū riding for Kamehameha Day a hundred and ten years ago! 1906.

PA-U RIDERS HONOR DAY

Picturesque Cavalcade Revives Old-Time Custom.

The Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii have every reason to be satisfied with their first parade as a society, which occurred yesterday in celebration of Kamehameha Day.

The custom of pa-u riding is an old and kingly one and it was eminently fitting that the initial gathering of the club should take place on the anniversary of the birth of Hawaii’s greatest king.

About 30 riders gathered at the residence of Mrs. Kainana Puahi at Waikiki early yesterday morning. The costumes, which were uniform, consisted of yellow skirts, white waists, and straw hats encircled with ilima leis. Each rider wore a black ribbon as a sash, bearing the word “Kaonohiokala,” done in gold. The word means “the eye of the sun.” Continue reading

King Kalakaua’s birthday to become a new holiday? 1916.

CELEBRATED WAS THE BIRTHDAY OF KING KALAKAUA YESTERDAY

THE DAY WAS CELEBRATED BY HAWAIIANS, THE HAOLE, THE LOCALS, AND THE NEWCOMERS, WITH THE THOUGHT THAT IT WOULD BECOME A NATIONAL HOLIDAY IN THE FUTURE.

1836—1891

[Williams Photo]

KALAKAUA’S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED.

For the first time, a commemoration of the birthday of King Kalakaua held extensively here in this city yesterday; this day will be celebrated in the future as is the birthday of the Conqueror of the Nation, Kamehameha.

In years past, there were but a very few people who celebrated this day, but from now on, the birthday of Kalakaua will be a day that is important in the history of Hawaii nei.

The activity taking place on the first celebration was the pa-u riding of twenty-one women of the Kaohelelani Pa-u Riders presided over by Mrs. Theresa Wilcox Belliveau. Continue reading