Eo, e Liliuonamoku! 2018.

HE INOA NO LILIUONAMOKU.

Kahiko ka nani i na kuahiwi,
Ka ohu halii i na pali,
He pali kapu kukilakila,
Mapu ke ala me ke onaona.

Hui:—He alii he wohi hoi keia,
A e hiipoi ia nei e ka Hui Nihoa,
Kohu wai mapunapuna,
E pua ae nei i ka puuwai.

Ianei pu mai kaua,
I ke kui lei pua alii,
I wilia pu ia me ke aloha,
Ka hoapili o ke kai Nihoa.

Hui Nihoa.

[A Name Song for Liliuonamoku.

Beauty adorns the mountains,
Mist blanketing the cliffs,
A sacred cliff standing aloft,
Where fragrance and perfume afloat.

Chorus:—’Tis an alii, a wohi,
Held dear by the Nihoa Society,
Like a bubbling spring,
Coming forth from the heart.

Let us be here together,
Stringing lei of royal blossoms,
Entwined with aloha,
The intimates of the sea of Nihoa.

Nihoa Society.]

[The Hui Nihoa, or Nihoa Society, consisted of members from the group which included the then Princess Liliuokalani who went to Nihoa in 1886.]

(Elele, 9/25/1886, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Elele, Buke VIII, Helu 13, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 25, 1886.

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Honors for Albert Nahaleʻā, 1939.

Nahale-a Selected

Albert Nahale-a previously of Hilo nei was elected as president for the Kauai chapter of the University of Hawaii Alumni Association at the meeting held in Waimea. Continue reading

The Queen, the flag, and the Boy Scouts, 1914.

Lincoln’s Birthday Marked By Graceful Courtesy of Hawaii’s Queen

QUEEN LILIUOKALANI PRESENTING NEW COLORS TO THE HONOLULU BOY SCOUTS.

From left to right: Col. C. P. Iaukea, the Queen, Mrs. George Smithies, Scout Commissioner Wilder and Scout Henry Thompson.

Liliuokalani, With Queenly Charm, Presents Flag to Boy Scouts.

“Honolulu V,” Boy Scouts of Hawaii, was formally christened “The Queen’s Own” yesterday afternoon, that title being conferred on them by Her Majesty, Queen Liliuokalani.

The aged ex-Queen stood proudly erect in the portico of her home, Washington Place, while twenty-one soldierly small boys, under the leadership of Scout Commissioner J. A. Wilder and Scoutmaster Harry S. Hayward, formed in line and saluted her. Liliuokalani was supported by Kaipo, with Col. Curtis P. Iaukea, Her Majesty’s chamberlain, acting as master of ceremonies, and John Dominis, Mrs. C. P. Iaukea and Gerrit P. Wilder in attendance.

Continue reading

More on the Boy Scout troop the “Queen’s Own,” 1914.

QUEEN LILIUOKALANI PRESENTS BEAUTIFUL FLAG TO BOY SCOUTS

A beautiful silk Hawaiian flag emblazoned with Queen Liliuokalani’s own crest and bearing the motto “Onipaa” which means “Be steadfast,” yesterday afternoon was presented by her majesty to Honolulu V. Boy Scouts of America, commanded by Scoutmaster Harry S. Hayward and known as the “Queen’s Own.” Continue reading

May Day is Lei Day in Hilo, 1941.

Day to Don Lei

Tomorrow is a great day here in Hilo; it is the day to wear lei, and everyone will be seen walking on the streets with lei.

Because tomorrow has become the day to wear lei, the Civic Club of Hilo took steps to hold a grand exhibit, and it will be shown to the public.

This event is held every year by this association, and this they expanded it by planing to have a grand entertainment at Kalakaua Square. At the same time, the queen who recently was victorious at the Holoku Ball this past month will preside while those that did not win the contest will be her attendants.

Joining in on the exhibition will also be queens chosen from the various schools of Hilo nei.

There will also be music by the Civic Club Choir, the Hawaiian Women’s Club of Hilo, and the County Band and the Hilo High School Band. Continue reading

Reminiscences of the Hui Kawaihau, 1916.

THE HUI KAWAIHAU

There were several unusually interesting papers read at the last meeting of the Kauai Historical Society. Among them was one by Judge Charles S. Dole on the above subject which was as follows:

In the years from 1877 to 1881 the Hui Kawaihau, an organization of certain prominent Hawaiians and their friends, was one of the leading communities of the eastern side of the island of Kauai.

They were a body of men—most of whom came from Honolulu, with their families, where many of them were high officers in the Government—who went to Kapaa under the patronage of King Kalakaua, whose reign had then lasted for several years, for the purpose of establishing an association of congenial and intelligent farmers on the fertile cane lands at Kapahi, above Kapaa, in the year 1877.

The Hui Kawaihau was originally a choral society, of fifteen members, with social rather than business aims, and was first organized by Prince Leleiohoku, the Heir Apparent to the throne, in the year 1876—just before King Kalakaua’s coronation day, which was February 12th of that year.

The name “Kawaihau” (meaning “ice-water”) was originally derived as the nick-name of a lady residing in Honolulu at that time, a white woman, who was a friend of the King, but who did not court some of his royal favors and in the matter of liquid refreshment would drink only pure ice-water, in preference to the fiery gin which was usually dispensed from His Majesty’s sideboard. This choice of the lady was not understood by certain members of the royal court, and in derision they gave her the title “Ka Wahine o Kawaihau” (“The Lady of the Icewater”), and she became commonly known by the shorter appellation of “Kawaihau.”

Prince Leleiohoku died,  however, in April of the following year, 1877, at Iolani Palace, and the choral society would doubtless have disbanded but that King Kalakaua decided that it might be a good opportunity to establish some of his royal retainers—upon whom the dissipating court life was beginning to pall, or rather, perhaps, was beginning to produce disastrous results—in the beautiful climate and fertile lands of the district above the village of Kapaa, on the eastern coast of Kauai.

Another reason for the royal strategem was said to be that, although many of the prospective farmers were intelligent and industrious men, there were quite a number of them who were courtiers and hangers-on at Kalakaua’s palace, whom the King was glad to establish on another island—distant from Honolulu and the charms and temptations of court life.

So the Hui was reorganized, in the month of June, 1877, and among the twelve members who were its charter members are the well known names of King Kalakaua, Governor Dominis, the King’s brother-in-law; Colonel George W. Macfarlane, one of the leaders in the court circles of that day; Captain James Makee, who had often entertained the members of the Royal family at his beautiful residence at Ulupalakua, on the island of Maui; Governor John M. Kapena, of the island of Oahu; J. S. Walker and C. H. Judd, two men prominent in the court and government communities of Honolulu; and Koakanu, a high chief of Koloa, on Kauai.

These twelve organizers were the ones who set in motion the wheels of business of the Hui o Kawaihau, in the year 1877, their first important official act being to sign a contract with the resident members of the Hui, thirty-two in number, for the cultivation of the lands of Kapaa, on Kauai, to sugar cane.

Of the thirty-two original resident members of the Hui there are but seven living, so far as is known, these being: Judge James H. K. Kaiwi, of Lihue, who is with us tonight, a member of this Society, and is the sole member of the Hui Kawaihau left on the island of Kauai; Edward K. Lilikalani, of Honolulu; Frank K. Archer (also known as Kelinohopono), of Pearl City, Oahu; Ekela Mahuka, of Honolulu; John Wallace, of Honolulu; James Hauola Makekau, of Lahaina, Maui; and the Reverend Isaac Iaea, of Kaluaaha, on the island of Molokai. Besides these there are four widows of the original members of the Hui, viz.: Mrs. Pipili Pakaua Polani, of Waipouli; Mrs. Kaupena Uka, of Hanalei; Mrs. Hana Kaiwi, of Honolulu;…

(Garden Island, 11/28/1916, p. 2) Continue reading

Upon the opening of Hulihee Palace, 1928.

Story of Hulihee Palace Told By Mrs. Swanzy On Even of New Dedication

The Daughters of Hawaii will dedicate the old Hulihee palace at Kailua, Kona, Hawaii, on noon of Kamehameha day, June 11, the ceremony to be followed by a luau at 1 o’clock.

Restoration of the old palace, the site of which was set aside by Governor Farrington for a Hawaiian museum to be maintained by and cared for under the management of the Daughter of Hawaii, has been one of the big accomplishments of the Daughters during the last year. The 1925 legislature appropriated $10,000 for its purchase. Continue reading