Kaahumanu Society gathering in Haleiwa, 1870.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

Kaahumanu Society.—The Society had a banquet on this past 30th of July, as was advertised in the Kuokoa, and there was just so much food. The Society paraded from the schoolhouse in Haleiwa to the church, and the event was opened with a prayer by J. N. Paikuli.—Himeni—Speech by S. N. Emerson, and after that was done—Himeni—The Chapter 1 of Honolulu stood, and after that—The Chapter 2 of Honolulu stood, and after that—Himeni—and after the ceremonies at the church was over—they paraded to the schoolhouse, and that was where they had their banquet. Those who took part were only those on the roster, and the families of the Society,—that concluded the function. The Ahahui convened again that night at 6:30, and 12 more members joined the Society, making the total members 30 or more.

[Although it has been said that the Kaahumanu Society disbanded at the death of Princess Victoria Kamamalu in 1866, there is this report of a meeting at Liliuokalani Church.]

(Kuokoa, 8/6/1870, p. 2)

Kuokoa_8_6_1870_2

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IX, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Augate 6, 1870.

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150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

And speaking of Princess V. K. Kamamalu and the Kaahumanu Society, here is how it was first established in the same year, 1864, by the three alii wahine Kamamalu, Pauahi, and Liliuokalani.

nupepa

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.

CONSTITUTION.

Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day…

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A mele for the birthday of Princess Victoria Kamehamalu Hae o Ku, 1864.

[Found under: “La hanau o ke Kama Alii Wahine”]

La Hanau.

1  No ka la hanau ke aloha,
La hanau o ke Alii,
Ke Kama o Hawaii nei,
Ka makua o ka lehulehu,
I keia la mua o Novemaba,
Ke ike nei kakou.

2  Ke ku nei no kakou,
Ma ka lai o Maunaihi,
Hoonani i ka la hanau,
La hanau o ke ‘Lii,
I keia la hoolai no,
Ua ike ko ka lani. Continue reading

Impressions of Hawaiians and the Mammoth Anti-Annexation Petitions, 1897.

OUR NEW DIALECT.

How the Coffee-Colored Gentleman From Hawaii Greets Us.

Washington Post.

Four coffee-colored gentlemen, native Hawaiians, were at the capitol yesterday, at work against annexation. Their cards read as follows:

Hon. David Kolauokalani [Kalauokalani], president Hawaiian Association Hui.

Joseph Helehuhe [Heleluhe], K. C. K., secretary and agent H. M. Liliuokalani, commissioner Hawaiian Patriotic League.

Hon. James K. Kaulia, president Hawaiian Patriotic League.

Colonel John Richardson, K. C. K., commissioner Hawaiian Patriotic League. Continue reading

Hui Oiwi o Kamehameha, 1943.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

By CARL THOENE

Alexander Minoaka Thoene has been elected kahuna nui of Hui Oiwi, the Hawaiian club, at the Kamehameha School for Boys. Minoaka, who is a senior, has been a member of the club since 1939. Norman Lunahooponopono Rosehill has been chosen kahuna, and William Kahuelani Stewart is now the club’s kakauolelo. Howard Kalani Benham has been chosen puuku and Edwin Mahiai Beamer has been re-elected alakai himeni. Continue reading

A mele composed by Mary Jane Montano for the fourth anniversary of the Outdoor Circle, 1916.

HONOLULU, OUR FAIRY LAND

A feature of yesterday’s birthday luncheon of the Outdoor Circle was the reading of a Hawaiian poem, written by Mrs. Mary Jane Kulani F. Montana [Montano], author of the verses of “The Old Plantation,” and dedicated to the Circle. The original verses and an English translation were read by Mrs. Webb. These were:

HONOLULU AINA KUPUA.

I.

I ka puu wau o Manoa,
I ka wai ola a Kanaloa,
E kilohi i ka nani punono
O Honolulu Aina Kupua.
Ua nani mai ka uka a ke kai
He mele aloha i ana ka puuwai,
Me he ala e i mai ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua.

II.

Ua kini a lau na pua,
Kumoana la i kanahele,
Kanahele ohai pua ala,
I kanu ia e na lima aulii.
Aloha i ke oho o ka niu,
I ka holu nape i ke ehu kai,
Me he ala e i aku ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua. Continue reading

Albert Nahale-a entertains patients at Puumaile Hospital, 1945.

Celebration

In the afternoon of Sunday, June 3, the Hula Studio of Albert Nahale-a [Pa Hula a Albert Nahale-a] arrived at the Puumaile Hospital to entertain the patients at that home.

It was heard that a Hula Studio would come to entertain the patients, and it was questioned, who was coming down, and in the afternoon of Saturday it was clear, the Hula Studio that was coming down.

A little before the clock struck 3:00 P. M., the bell to rise rang. The people got up and made ready for the arrival of the Hula Studio. Nahale-a’s people arrived, and a little bit after 3:00 P. M. the emcee announced that they were ready to start the activities. Continue reading