Forty years ago, Brothers Cazimero May Day Concert at the Shell! 1978.

[Found under: “Show Biz: Wayne Harada”]

Hana hou

For You a Lei Day Program. The Brothers Cazimero, who just appeared in Ken Rosene’s Hawaii Contemporary Music Festival, will do an “encore” of sorts come May Day. Yep, on Lei Day—May 1—Robert and Roland Cazimero will headline a May Day concert at the Waikiki Shell. Continue reading

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May Day is Lei Day in Hilo, 1941.

Day to Don Lei

Tomorrow is a great day here in Hilo; it is the day to wear lei, and everyone will be seen walking on the streets with lei.

Because tomorrow has become the day to wear lei, the Civic Club of Hilo took steps to hold a grand exhibit, and it will be shown to the public.

This event is held every year by this association, and this they expanded it by planing to have a grand entertainment at Kalakaua Square. At the same time, the queen who recently was victorious at the Holoku Ball this past month will preside while those that did not win the contest will be her attendants.

Joining in on the exhibition will also be queens chosen from the various schools of Hilo nei.

There will also be music by the Civic Club Choir, the Hawaiian Women’s Club of Hilo, and the County Band and the Hilo High School Band. Continue reading

Lei Day 50 years ago, 1968.

It all started in 1928

Wear your aloha shirts, muumuus, leis tomorrow

As has been the custom since Grace Tower Warren and Don Blanding began the observance of Lei Day in 1928, aloha shirts, muumuus and leis will be the garb of the day tomorrow.

Throughout the Islands each year on May Day, schools and other institutions present their May programs and lei contests.

The Oahu Lei Contest, sponsored by the Department of Parks and Recreation, will be judged tomorrow and the leis will be on display at the Waikiki Shell from 1 to 9 p.m.

Prizes totaling $650 will be awarded to  lei makers in different categories.

Darlene Bakke, this year’s lei queen, will reign over the festivities including music, hula dancing and pageantry, to be held at the Shell.

A demonstration of kahili making—kahilis were the standard of royalty in Old Hawaii—will be given from 9 to 11 a.m. on the Shell lawn. Continue reading

Chinese New Year celebrated in Hilo, 1883.

Island Notes.

HAWAII—HILO.

Genial showers are falling, the cane is growing, the mills grinding, and everything promises prosperity.

Yesterday the Chinese New Year, or Konohi, passed off in grand celestial style. Bales of firecrackers, Chinese bombs and Roman candles were exploded, and any amount of chickens, rice and sweetmeats were consumed. The layout was grand in every Chinese establishment. The blooming jonquils, fragrant lilies and other flowers formed the background to their loaded tables. All were welcome and hospitality was dealt out indiscriminately with a free hand. Continue reading

Kaahumanu Society on Kauai, 1918.

COMMEMORATION OF THE FIRST YEAR OF THE KAAHUMANU SOCIETY ON KAUAI OF MANOKALANIPO.

At the Hawaiian Church of Lihue, on Saturday, December 8, at 10 a.m., the one year meeting of the Society of the Kaahumanu Mothers, with the opening with the 2nd hymn of Leo Hoonani [“All the Way my Savior Leads me”], and the prayer from the mother, Mrs. Kaoo Kolohaiole, the preacher of the Society, (the prayer of the preacher was so very filled with reverence).

The proceedings of the society began with the calling of the president, Mrs. Mileka Kahele, and the head secretary of the society, Mrs. Eliza K. C. Holt. Continue reading