E o, e Kauikeaouli, ka Moi Lokomaikai, 1921.

COMMEMORATING THE DAY OF BIRTH OF KAUIKEAOULI.

At Kawaiahao Church, on the morning of this coming Sunday, March 13, a memorial assembly for the birthday of King Kamehameha III (Kauikeaouli) will be held, under the direction of the Ahahui o na Mamakakaua. Continue reading

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Konohi celebrated 120 years ago, 1897.

Konohi Celebration.

This past 2nd, that being Hoaka by the reckoning of Ka Makaainana of the year, and it is the second day of the new year of the Chinese; Walter Akana held a new year party on his father’s side at his home on Maunakea Street. There were many friends who inĀ  attendance to celebrate with him, from those on his father’s side to those on his mother’s side. After a rest, there was a Hawaiian hula olapa program; there was much enjoyment, held peacefully until the late of the night.

(Makaainana, 2/8/1897, p. 5)

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Ka Makaainana, Buke VII—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 5. Feberuari 8, 1897.

Euginia Keohokalani Maluhi Pilipo and Manuel Reis married 50 years, 1929.

TWO OF THEM MARRIED FOR 50 YEARS

FRIENDS GATHER TO GIVE THEIR CONGRATULATIONS

At the hour of 3 in the afternoon, of this past Wednesday, Dec. 4, Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Reis opened their home to welcome their many friends who went to honor them for their fifty years of marriage.

Euginia Keohokalani Maluhi Pilipo and Manuel Reis were married on December 4, 1879, at 8 o’clock that night in the Roman Catholic Church by Bishop Halemano.

Mr. Reis arrived in Honolulu nei in 1875 as the result of an accident. He was working aboard the whaler Atlantic [moku-o-kohola Akelanika] and sailed here to the Pacific Ocean. One night their whaler crashed into another whaler, but neither sank. Both captains of the damaged ships decided to sail for Hawaii, 4000 miles away, whereas from where they crashed it was only 2000 miles away from the closest land.

Reis landed in Hawaii nei on September 12, 1875. He became sick, and because he did not get well before the ship left, he was left behind here in Honolulu, and that is why he lived here and married his wife of fifty years of marriage.

Mrs. Reis was born in Honolulu nei in January 1865.

They have three children; one boy and two girls. The girls are school teachers for our government schools.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 12/12/1929, p. 1)

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Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 33, Aoao 1. Dekemapa 12, 1929.

Na olelo ponoi o Kalani Kalakaua ma kona la hanau, 1874.

“Aloha oukou:

Ua lawe mai au i keia la, oia hoi kuu la hanau, i la hoomaikai i ka Mea Mana, no na pomaikai o ko kakou ola kino a kokoke i ka puni o keia makahiki. A ano ka mea hoi, ke kokoke mai nei ka manawa o Ko’u holo ana aku i na aina e, e imi i ka pomaikai o na hana nui a ko kakou aupuni; ua puili ae au i keia wa, e hai aku i Ko’u aloha ia oukou e na makaainana.

Ke hele nei au e hooko aku i ka mea a ke kau Ahaolelo i hooholo iho nei.

He mea mau iloko o na moolelo kahiko o na aupuni a me ko keia wa no hoi, ke kaahele ana o na Aimoku iloko o kekahi mau aupuni e aku, e imi ana no i pomaikai lahui iho. Continue reading

King Kalakaua’s 50th birthday celebration, with detailed tour of Iolani Palace, 1886.

THE KING’S BIRTHDAY.

The Palace Decorated for the Festivities.

Changes in the Pictures and Decorations Which Bring Out the Ancient History of the People.

In view of the festivities which commence this morning in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the natal day of His Majesty the King, Iolani Palace has undergone extensive preparations, the arrangements for the reception and entertainment of the guests being very complete. The balconies are bedecked in bunting embodying in bold and striking designs the colors of the Royal Standard. The principal entrance hall has been richly caparisoned at the hands of the upholsterer. Its walls have been newly hung with the valuable oil paintings, representing in life size the line of Hawaiian Sovereigns, with their consorts, from the time of Kamehameha I, downwards. The first position on the right is occupied by the portrait of the Conqueror, whose reign marked so momentous and epoch in the history of the Kingdom, and whose genius has so largely influenced its destiny. Side by side with this is the portrait of Kekauluohi, mother of King Lunalilo. Next are those of Kmehameha II and Queen Kaumaulii [Kamamalu ?]; Kamehameha III and Queen Kalama. On the left are arranged the portraits of Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma; Kamehameha V and King Lunalilo. The niches in the intervening spaces are each filled with some choice fern or other horticultural specimen. The general effect is extremely pleasing to the eye.

The throne room, in which the receptions will take place, has been newly furnished with a rich crimson carpet. On either side of the dais are suspended the Royal Orders of Kamehameha, Kalakaua, Kapiolani and the Crown of Hawaii, whilst the walls on every side are adorned with the numerous foreign decorations with which His Majesty has from time to time been invested. Each one is enclosed in a gilt oval frame, surmounted with the Royal Arms of the particular nation or empire to which the Order belongs. Leaving the throne room and crossing the central hall, one passes into the Blue room . The first object that meets the eye is a striking portrait of His Majesty in the uniform of the King’s Guard, with decorations. Facing this, to the right of the doorway, is one of Her Majesty the Queen, whilst on the left is a full length life size representation of Louis XIV of France, a work of rare value. The two former are from the brush of Charles Hasselmann. Among the many ornaments and curios is a set of vases in Benares brass ware, from India. To the rear of this apartment is the spacious dining hall, in which are displayed the massive silver table ware, each article bearing the Royal Arms in colored enamel. The furniture is early English in style, whilst some choice works of art adorns the walls. The latter include a portrait of Kamehameha IV, taken during the monarch’s boyhood, a companion pair of Napoleon I and IV, taken during that monarch’s boyhood, a companion pair of Napoleon I and Blucher; Admiral Thomas, who restored the country; the Czar Alexander II of Russia, and a graphic delineation of the crater of Kilauea by night, painted by Furneaux.

Ascending the grand staircase the upper hall is next entered, wherein the King’s Privy Council of State is usually held. The central figure is a bust in bronze of His Majesty the King; oil paintings and tasteful cabinets, containing articles of vertu,are disposed on either side, while the hall, which runs the entire width of the building, commands a magnificent vista of Pauoa Valley, the mountains, tier behind tier, with the different hues forming an effective background. The front window overlooks the Aliiolani Hale, and affords a distant view of the sea.

The private apartments of His Majesty lead off from the upper hall, and are located on the left, or Ewa, side of the Palace. In the front is the music room, in which the heavy style of furniture is discarded for a lighter and more appropriate one, the appointments being in excellent taste. In the room are a set of half a dozed water color drawings of special historic interest. They are illustrative of island scenes at a period prior to the advent of civilization, among which are representations of the large double canoes carrying the ancient idols; the heiaus or temples, both open and closed; grass houses, etc. These pictures are enlargements by R. C. Barnfield, after the originals taken on the spot by Captain Kotzbue, the Russian author of “Voyages in the Pacific.”

At the further end, facing the entrance, is a speaking likeness of Her Majesty the Queen, life size, in oil, by Furneaux. The room also contains a very fine painting of the crater of Kilauea, by Tavernier; a Belgian Princess, a daughter of the present King, together with cabinet photographs of Sir John and Lady Franklin. Less obtrusive, but of considerable interest, is a study in music, framed in a peculiarly chaste and unique manner.

Continue reading

Josephine Pomaikai Luia turns one year old, 1916.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko.”]

There was a table set out of all sorts of delicacies to celebrate the completion of the first year of that flower bud, Miss Josephine Pomaikai Luia, this past Sunday, October 8, 1916, at Kunawai, at the Supernatural Stone of Kawaiiki [?? Pohaku Kupua o Kawaiiki]. There were many friends and associates who went to visit; also there were some candidates who were chosen recently at the election, to eat heartily together of the rich foods of the feast. Long live the new offspring was the prayer of those who joined in the eating.

[Might anyone know what the pohaku kupua at Kawaiiki in Kunawai is?]

(Kuokoa, 10/13/1916, p. 4)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 41, Aoao 4. Okatoba 13, 1916.

E o, e Ka Walu o Na Lani! 1875.

Birthday of the Princess Liliu.

This past Thursday, September 2, made the thirty-seventh year of Her Highness, the Princess for whom is this kahoahoa:

O Liliu o Loloku
O Walania i ke kii onohi
O ka onohi o Kalani Nui
Ke ka Hiwauli o Ku
O Kamakaeha o Kina.

She was born at Mana, Manamana, Honolulu, on September 2, 1838, a royal daughter of Caisara Kapaakea and A. Keohokalole and she was a younger sibling of the Alii, King Kalakaua. Continue reading