Alexander Young Cafe, 1910.

There is more than soupcon of elegance in the meals served at the Alexander Young Cafe. It is real, from top to bottom of the menu card, and nothing is left to the imagination.

[I was just told by someone who knew the establishment that the cheese bread that came out of the bakery was the best. But she heard that the baker took the recipe with him when he passed on… And you don’t hear the word “soupçon” very often these days!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 5/1/1910, p. 18)

PCA_5_1_1910_18.png

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume VII, Number 382, Page 18. May 1, 1910.

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Lydia Bingham returns to head the Honolulu Female Seminary, 1867

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

Honolulu Female Seminary.—In our advertising columns will be seen the advertisement of the Honolulu Female Academy, which is another of the schools provided by Christian benevolence for the benefit of the children of this highly favored land. This institution will, it is hoped, supply a felt need for a home for girls, in the town of Honolulu, yet not too near its center of business. It is being commenced in the substantial buildings erected many years since by the American Mission as a printing house and bindery, in connection with the premises of the Rev. E. W. Clark, Continue reading

Hoapili and Kiliwehi in New Zealand, 1866.

VISIT TO THE MAORI KING MATUTAERA.

The correspondent of the Southern Cross at Waiuku sends the  following description of a visit recently paid by him to the quarters of the Maori king Matutaera, in company with two visitors from the Sandwich Islands:— Continue reading

On sacred stones, 1921.

THE STONE FISH GODDESS “MALEI” TO BE RETURNED TO MAKAPUU

Hawaiians have not forgotten the story about the stone goddess called “Malei,” a stone deity cared for and worshiped by the Hawaiian fishermen in the olden days; the great fish that the stone deity always brought to shore was the uhu, as is seen in the story of Hiiaka:

“Aia la o ka uku kai o Makapuu,
He i’a ia na Malei na ka wahine e noho ana i ka ulu a ka makani,
I Koolau ke ola i ka huaka’i malihini,
Kanaenae a Hiiaka i ka poli o Pele,
E Malei e, i halekipa ke aloha, e uwe mai!’

[There are the uhu of Makapuu which swim in procession,
Fish of Malei that dwells in the rising winds,
In Koolau lies the sustenance for the unfamiliar travellers,
Hiiakaikapoliopele prays,
O Malei, welcome us in love; let us weep!]

Continue reading

Aloha is a reciprocal thing, 1779, 1867 and beyond.

[From: S. M. Kamakau’s “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I: Ke Au ia Kalaniopuu A. D. 1779. No ka Make ana o Kapena Kuke, Oia Hoi o Lono.”]

Kalaniopuu treated Captain Cook generously, and gave him pigs, taro, sweet potato, bananas, and other things; he also gave him ahuula capes, mahiole, kahili, feather lei, fine wooden bowls, various fine kapa, ahu ao mats from Puna, and garments of hinalo—Captain Cook gave Kalaniopuu some rubbish—(It is said that the hat that Captain Cook gave to Kalaniopuu is in the head of the kaai of Keaweikekahialiiokamoku.)

(Kuokoa, 2/2/1867, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 5, Aoao 1. Feberuari 2, 1867.

Hooulu lahui, 1872.

[Found under: “NA OLELO HOOLAHA.”]

TO HAWAIIAN PARENTS.

IN ORDER to encourage Hawaiian parents to take good care of their children, and to assist in the growing of the people of this Archipelago, I do certify that I will pay

A PRIZE OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS

to each and every child born in Waikapu, Maui, after this day. These are the conditions of this Agreement. It is a child born in Waikapu proper, Continue reading