54 years after their arrival, the old gannenmono are taken for a joyride, 1922.

The Newest and the Oldest

The three old gannenmono go on a joyride in a Cadillac in 1922.

There was coverage in this column last week about Dr. Eijiro Nishijima purchasing the newest 1922 model four-passenger Cadillac (Phaeton) from the American Hawaiian Motors Company, but there is a story about the group of Hawaii’s oldest [Japanese] men sightseeing within the city in this newest car. That is, last Wednesday, the three old men, [Sentaro] Ishii, [Yonekichi] Sakuma, and [Katsusaburo] Yoshida were invited to the Youth Association’s Thursday  luncheon, and on their way home, in front of the Nishijima Clinic on Kukui Street, through the introduction of an accompanying reporter of this paper, Mrs. Nishijima thought it would be nice to give the old men a ride, and with their pleasure, Shuichi Hirano of the aforementioned car company who was present personally took the wheel, and drove the three old men straight down Beritania Avenue. The car was great, the road was great, and Manoa Valley, beautiful. Continue reading

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Casualties from exploding lava, 1924.

MET WITH DEATH FROM ROCKS FROM THE THE LAVA

Two Haole Soldiers Disappear Without Being Found—It is Believed They Too Were Victims of the Lava

These are the two haole soldiers who disappeared without their bodies being found from the morning of this past Sunday. The two were last seen in an area near the crater, before the powerful lava explosion.

From the left is Edward J. Hinman, and to his right is Howard J. Simmons, they are both soldiers of the engineers of Leilehua, and they were camping at Kilauea, Hawaii.

As per the very latest news received from Hilo town, Madame Pele is surely at it these days, displaying her wondrous power which causes fear in a great many of Hawaii’s people who went to see the volcanic activity.

Amongst the visitors on this past Sunday was one who met with tragedy, after breaking both his legs and being burned by the hot ash from the lava, that being Truman T. Taylor, the bookkeeper of Pahala Sugar Plantation. Continue reading

Escaping rocks thrown into the sky, 1924.

The Deeds of Madame Pele, the Woman of the Pit, are Wondrous

Many Lives are Spared
From the Rocks of Lava

Rocks and Ash are Thrown into the Sky When the Lava Exploded This Past Tuesday

HILO, May 13.—Many lives were spared this afternoon, because Thomas E. Boles, the superintendent of Hawaii national park, foresaw the trouble and forbade people from going to see the crater of Halemaumau, just minutes before the powerful explosion of lava, throwing huge rocks to a distance of 2000 feet. Volcanic ash was shot 1800 feet in the sky above the crater. Continue reading

Forty years ago, Brothers Cazimero May Day Concert at the Shell! 1978.

[Found under: “Show Biz: Wayne Harada”]

Hana hou

For You a Lei Day Program. The Brothers Cazimero, who just appeared in Ken Rosene’s Hawaii Contemporary Music Festival, will do an “encore” of sorts come May Day. Yep, on Lei Day—May 1—Robert and Roland Cazimero will headline a May Day concert at the Waikiki Shell. Continue reading

Early days of Daniel Akaka, 1939.

STUDENT SOVEREIGNS: Daniel Akaka, left, and Hannah Ho will reign as king and queen over the Merry Makers’ carnival to be held Friday night at the Kawananakoa school grounds. They were elected by the students of Kawananakoa.—Star-Bulletin photo.

(Star Bulletin, 4/18/1939, p. 2)

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Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XLVI, Number 14537, Page 2. April 18, 1939.

Manuia Maunupau, old-time Kona fisherman, passes away, 1940.

Noted Isle Fisherman Who Taught Rulers, Will Be Buried Today

MANUIA MAUNUPAU

Manuia Maunupau Dies In Honolulu After Long Career On Kona Coast

A famous old-time Hawaiian fisherman, one who taught Island royalty the art, will be laid to rest here this afternoon when Manuia Maunupau of Kailua, Kona, is buried.

Mr. Maunupau died Sunday night at the home of his son, Thomas K. Maunupau, 3326 Hoolulu street, after an illness of three months. He was 68 years old and had come to Honolulu in February for medical treatment.

Born In Honolulu

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today at Silva’s mortuary, where the body has been on view since last night. Interment will take place Puea cemetery.

Mr. Maunupau was born in Honuakaha, this city, but spent his boyhood days in fishing at Kuhio and Kaupulehu, two of the old-time fishing villages in that section of Kona called “the waste and waterless Kekaha.”

Knew Waters

It was from his father, Maihui, that he learned the various methods of fishing. He knew the names and location of the koas or fishing grounds, particularly those surrounding the area know as Haleohi’u, “the house of many fish tails,” which is located between Keahole Point and Kuhio.

Mr. Maunupau knew the landmarks of these fishing grounds: their characteristics, such as depth, current and the kinds of fish that are found there. He knew the stars, current and the winds.He knew every rock and reef offshore and could steer a canoe or boat blindfolded along the west coast of Hawaii.

Royal Fisherman

For a short time, Manuia Maunupau was a mate on a schooner owned by George McDougall, who was then doing business in Kailua, Hawaii, more than 40 years ago, and which ran between West Hawaii ports and Honolulu.

J. B. Curts, manager of H. Hackfeld & Co., Ltd., of Kailua, Hawaii, hired him as a pilot to steer lumber vessels when they were…

(Honolulu Advertiser, 3/26/1940, p. 1)

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The Honolulu Advertiser, 84th Year, Number 19,145, Page 1. March 26, 1940.

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