Revealing what was lost, 2021.

La Hanau

EDWIN M. DESHA

O Edwin M. Desha, ka  Lunanui o Ka Hoku o Hawaii, ke hoomanao ana i kona la hanau ma keia Poalima iho, Okakoba 18.

Mawaho ae o kona kulana he boki nui no ka Hoku, he kakauolelo o Mr. Desha na Lunahoomalu Samuel M. Spencer of ke Kalana o Hawaii. He lala ku maikai oia no ka hui Liona o Hilo, a pela nohoi me kekahi mau ahahui e ae. Ma kekahi olelo ana ae, he kanaka paa loa oia i ka hana a aole he loaa iaia ka manawa no ka lawe ana i kona hoomaha, a pela nohoi ma kona la hanau.

Me na upu maikai ana no ka la hanau hauoli e Eddie, mai ka papa pa’i holookoa o ka Hoku.

[Did you check out the new “Nūhou Monday” post out from Bishop Museum’s He Aupuni Palapala group? It talks about you can actually see a picture of Edwin M. Desha in the original of this newspaper! Click here to get taken to the page.

P.S. I am amused with the phrase “he boki nui”.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 10/16/1940, p. 1)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 25, Aoao 1. Okakoba 16, 1940.

Looking back to the Hawaiian football champions of 1895, 1926.

WINNERS OF FIRST MAINLAND — ISLAND GRID TILT

Here is the Honolulu team, island champions and victors over the Navy champs from Philadelphia. Top row, standing, left to right—Billie Cornwell, Chris Holt, Louis Singer. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

Captain Samuel Mana, 1900.

A MAN WHO PERSEVERES AT HIS OCCUPATION

CAPTAIN SAMUEL MANA IS ADMIRED

KAPENA SAMUEL MANA.

Sam Mana is one of the Hawaiians who is employed in the Sailing Profession as a Captain, and he is the only one among us who has been at it from a very long time ago, and because of his fortitude, he has been promoted by his foremen, and has now become the Captain of the ship the Concord. Continue reading

Duke Kahanamoku at the Lei Day celebration at Honolulu Hale, 1948.

SHERIFF DUKE P. KAHANAMOKU and Pacific Queen Nola Rose were greeted enthusiastically by the audience at the city hall Lei Day observance. Wearing a lei, hibiscus in her hair and a colorful print dress, the Australian blonde was a contrasting, yet harmonious note, in the ensemble of color and gaiety at the city hall.—Star-Bulletin photos.

(Star-Bulletin, 5/3/1948,  p. 11)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume LIV, Number 17356, Page 11. May 3, 1948.

Hawaiian Mission Academy, graduating class, 1924.

GRADUATING CLASS, 1924, HAWAIIAN MISSION ACADEMY

Back row, left to right—Clarence E. Stafford, class pres.; Jonah Kumalae Jr., treas.; T. Y. Yamamoto, Masuo Susukida. Continue reading

Death of Victoria Keola, 1921.

OUR BELOVED DAUGHTER, MRS. VICTORIA KEOLA HAS PASSED ON.

MRS. VICTORIA KEOLA.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspapers, Aloha oe:—Please may we ask you to be patient and give us an open space of the Kuokoa for our parcel, and the paper will carry it upon the billows of the ocean until it reaches land, so that the family and friends of the beloved daughter of ours will see, whereas we, her parents were living at ease without dreaming of this ahead of time. On Monday, Jan. 17, while her father was getting ready to get on this horse to go into the mountains to perform his usual duties of seeking out steer, his female employer called out, “E Paahana, there was a wireless telegram from Honolulu saying Mrs. Victoria Keola is dead. That was a time for sadness and grief. From there, her father turned back for home and told the sad news to the family, there was a telegram telling of Victoria’s death. He got on the Kilauea of Monday, Jan. 17, with the great desire to see her remains, but no, her body was gone on the 17th while her papa was sailing on the sea. When he reached Honolulu, he got on a car and travelled straight for the house of his children [? daughter]; he saw his son-in-law and his grandchildren, but his beloved daughter, Mrs. Victoria Keola, he did not see, and his tears of love flowed and he went up to Maemae and saw the grave of our beloved, and his tears flowed; aloha for his daughter who went afar! Continue reading

Will Rogers and Hawaiian independence, 1932.

ROGERS SAYS LET HAWAII ISLES ALONE

(Special Star-Bulletin Wireless)

SANTA MONICA, Cal., May 2.—Well, about all you can see in the papers is Honolulu. The whole thing just proves that the islands haven’t got any use for the navy and the mainland.

Of course, I guess I am all wet, but I never have seen any reason why the U. S. or any nation should hold under subjection of any kind any islands or country outside of our own. Continue reading