Death of Victoria Keola, 1921.

OUR BELOVED DAUGHTER, MRS. VICTORIA KEOLA HAS PASSED ON.

MRS. VICTORIA KEOLA.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspapers, Aloha oe:—Please may we ask you to be patient and give us an open space of the Kuokoa for our parcel, and the paper will carry it upon the billows of the ocean until it reaches land, so that the family and friends of the beloved daughter of ours will see, whereas we, her parents were living at ease without dreaming of this ahead of time. On Monday, Jan. 17, while her father was getting ready to get on this horse to go into the mountains to perform his usual duties of seeking out steer, his female employer called out, “E Paahana, there was a wireless telegram from Honolulu saying Mrs. Victoria Keola is dead. That was a time for sadness and grief. From there, her father turned back for home and told the sad news to the family, there was a telegram telling of Victoria’s death. He got on the Kilauea of Monday, Jan. 17, with the great desire to see her remains, but no, her body was gone on the 17th while her papa was sailing on the sea. When he reached Honolulu, he got on a car and travelled straight for the house of his children [? daughter]; he saw his son-in-law and his grandchildren, but his beloved daughter, Mrs. Victoria Keola, he did not see, and his tears of love flowed and he went up to Maemae and saw the grave of our beloved, and his tears flowed; aloha for his daughter who went afar! Continue reading

Will Rogers and Hawaiian independence, 1932.

ROGERS SAYS LET HAWAII ISLES ALONE

(Special Star-Bulletin Wireless)

SANTA MONICA, Cal., May 2.—Well, about all you can see in the papers is Honolulu. The whole thing just proves that the islands haven’t got any use for the navy and the mainland.

Of course, I guess I am all wet, but I never have seen any reason why the U. S. or any nation should hold under subjection of any kind any islands or country outside of our own. Continue reading

More on Aunty Elizabeth from Bishop Museum’s post today, 1959.

‘Aunty Elizabeth,’ Kalakaua Ave. Lei-Seller, Dies

Another familiar face in the fast-changing Waikiki scenery passed from view Saturday with the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Hoopii Delovio—”Aunty Elizabeth” to thousands.

The 54-year-old woman and two others were the first to set up a lei stand in Waikiki some 35 years ago. Continue reading

On the passing of Mileka Paia, 1920.

AN EXPRESSION OF ALOHA.

MRS. MILEKA PAIA.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, aloha nui oe:—Please may you be patient in inserting in an open space of the columns of the esteemed newspaper of the lahui so that the many intimates and friends will know, and it shall be the speedy messenger pigeon that carries to all the neighborhoods of our islands, from where the sun arrives at Haehae until where it sets at the base of Lehua, that Mrs. Mileka Paia has passed, the lehua blossom has faded; she sleeps the sleep of summer and winter; the lehua scattering rain of Panaewa will no more sprinkle upon her, the Kanilehua rain will no more mist upon her cheeks, the lehua lei of Olaa will no more adorn her; and following her are mounds of tears being cried for her constantly night and day, while trying to calm the aloha that cannot be calmed, for she is gone, no more will we see her and hear her voice. Auwe, how heart wrenching! Continue reading

I wonder what the other 88 photos were like, 1953.

HAWAIIANS ACT LIKE JAPANESE—Second graders of the Kamehameha Preparatory School donned Japanese costumes to enact this story of Japanese life. The photograph is one of the 90 in the exhibit Kamehameha Folio opening today at Bishop Museum in commemoration of the birthdate of Bernice Pauahi Bishop.—Kam School Photo.

KAMEHAMEHA FOLIO—The beaut of the Hawaiian kahili is reflected on the face of Nani Kapu, Kamehameha School student, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kapu. Nani’s photograph will be one of the 90 showing the activities of Kamehameha School students in the exhibit, Kamehameha Folio, opening today at Bishop Museum.—Luryier Diamond Photo.

Kam Schools Open Pauahi Birthday Museum Exhibit

Pauahi, daughter of the High Chiefs Konia and Paki, was born December 19, 1831, a date commemorated each year by the students of the Kamehameha Schools. Continue reading

S. S. Haleakala, 1923.

S. S. Haleakala

The Newest Steamer in the Pacific

TODAY!

Another stride of progress is recorded in the annals of inter-island travel in the Hawaiian Islands—by the arrival of the newly completed steamship Haleakala in her home port!

The coming of the Haleakala brings with it the beginning of a new era of travel service on this splendid new ship that is replete with comfort and convenience. Continue reading

Kamehameha V as recalled by R. A. Lyman and W. D. Alexander, 1902.

RECOLLECTIONS OF KAMEHAMEHA V.

Bold and Wise Sovereign as Remembered by R. A. Lyman.

Hawaii has not been known to the world very many years, but during that time a King of whom she may well be proud has reigned over the land, a King who would compare very favor­ably with the monarchs of more en­lightened nations. Kamehameha V., who ascended the throne of the Ha­waiian Islands upon the death of Ka­mehameha IV. in 1863.

Before ascending the throne Kameha­meha V. had acted as Minister of the Interior under Kamehameha IV. He had a very strong will, so that he was not Minister in name alone, but attended faithfully to the duties of his office. Continue reading

Death of Helena Haumea, 1920.

MY LOVING LEI HELENA HAUMEA HAS PASSED ON.

MRS. HELENA HAUMEA.

Mr. Sol. Hanohanno, Aloha oe:–Please may I ask for your patience for my painful bundle above, and insert it in an open space of our pride, the speedy messenger that goes about the islands, so that the intimates and friends of my dear loving lei, Helena Haumea, will know. Continue reading