John Waiamau Kekuhaupio Aneheialima dies, 1901.

REV. J. WAIAMAU HAS PASSED.

Passed at 12:30 in the Dawn of Monday.

Many Friends Went on His Final Journey—He was 64 Years Old.

At dawn on Monday of this week, the life breath of John Waiamau Kekuhaupio Aneheialima was fetched and taken from the one known to us by his first names. With his death, gone is one of the kind, generous, good, and enlightened elders of this archipelago. He was born at Niulii, Kohala, Hawaii, in the year 1837; he spent sixty-four years of his life in this world. Aneheialima was his Father, and Waiwaiole was his Mother.

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The Queen, the flag, and the Boy Scouts, 1914.

Lincoln’s Birthday Marked By Graceful Courtesy of Hawaii’s Queen

QUEEN LILIUOKALANI PRESENTING NEW COLORS TO THE HONOLULU BOY SCOUTS.

From left to right: Col. C. P. Iaukea, the Queen, Mrs. George Smithies, Scout Commissioner Wilder and Scout Henry Thompson.

Liliuokalani, With Queenly Charm, Presents Flag to Boy Scouts.

“Honolulu V,” Boy Scouts of Hawaii, was formally christened “The Queen’s Own” yesterday afternoon, that title being conferred on them by Her Majesty, Queen Liliuokalani.

The aged ex-Queen stood proudly erect in the portico of her home, Washington Place, while twenty-one soldierly small boys, under the leadership of Scout Commissioner J. A. Wilder and Scoutmaster Harry S. Hayward, formed in line and saluted her. Liliuokalani was supported by Kaipo, with Col. Curtis P. Iaukea, Her Majesty’s chamberlain, acting as master of ceremonies, and John Dominis, Mrs. C. P. Iaukea and Gerrit P. Wilder in attendance.

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E. K. Fernandez, 1963.

Entertainment

E. K. Fernandez is a man whose life has been jam-packed with “firsts.”

At the turn of the century he promoted the “first” giveaway, offering a camera a week to attract customers to his photo supply business.

He brought to Hawaii the “first” English motion picture camera and showed the “first” talkies in the Islands.

He pushed through the Legislature a measure allowing, for the “first” time, motion pictures on Sundays (providing they were educational and Biblical in nature).

His “first” Sunday motion picture? Something with Charlie Chaplin titled “Tillie’s Punctured  Romance.”

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54 years after their arrival, the old gannenmono are taken for a joyride, 1922.

The Newest and the Oldest

The three old gannenmono go on a joyride in a Cadillac in 1922.

There was coverage in this column last week about Dr. Eijiro Nishijima purchasing the newest 1922 model four-passenger Cadillac (Phaeton) from the American Hawaiian Motors Company, but there is a story about the group of Hawaii’s oldest [Japanese] men sightseeing within the city in this newest car. That is, last Wednesday, the three old men, [Sentaro] Ishii, [Yonekichi] Sakuma, and [Katsusaburo] Yoshida were invited to the Youth Association’s Thursday  luncheon, and on their way home, in front of the Nishijima Clinic on Kukui Street, through the introduction of an accompanying reporter of this paper, Mrs. Nishijima thought it would be nice to give the old men a ride, and with their pleasure, Shuichi Hirano of the aforementioned car company who was present personally took the wheel, and drove the three old men straight down Beritania Avenue. The car was great, the road was great, and Manoa Valley, beautiful. Continue reading

Casualties from exploding lava, 1924.

MET WITH DEATH FROM ROCKS FROM THE THE LAVA

Two Haole Soldiers Disappear Without Being Found—It is Believed They Too Were Victims of the Lava

These are the two haole soldiers who disappeared without their bodies being found from the morning of this past Sunday. The two were last seen in an area near the crater, before the powerful lava explosion.

From the left is Edward J. Hinman, and to his right is Howard J. Simmons, they are both soldiers of the engineers of Leilehua, and they were camping at Kilauea, Hawaii.

As per the very latest news received from Hilo town, Madame Pele is surely at it these days, displaying her wondrous power which causes fear in a great many of Hawaii’s people who went to see the volcanic activity.

Amongst the visitors on this past Sunday was one who met with tragedy, after breaking both his legs and being burned by the hot ash from the lava, that being Truman T. Taylor, the bookkeeper of Pahala Sugar Plantation. Continue reading

Escaping rocks thrown into the sky, 1924.

The Deeds of Madame Pele, the Woman of the Pit, are Wondrous

Many Lives are Spared
From the Rocks of Lava

Rocks and Ash are Thrown into the Sky When the Lava Exploded This Past Tuesday

HILO, May 13.—Many lives were spared this afternoon, because Thomas E. Boles, the superintendent of Hawaii national park, foresaw the trouble and forbade people from going to see the crater of Halemaumau, just minutes before the powerful explosion of lava, throwing huge rocks to a distance of 2000 feet. Volcanic ash was shot 1800 feet in the sky above the crater. Continue reading