Hauoli La Hanau, e Mary Kawena Pukui! 1964.

Isle Scholar Celebrates Birthday With New Work

By MARY COOKE

Mary Kawena Pukui, dean of Hawaiian scholars, has two reasons to celebrate today.

It’s her 69th birthday, and the English-Hawaiian Dictionary, part of a project for which she started the research 30 years ago, is just out.

It is a companion volume of the Hawaiian-English Dictionary published in 1957. On both works her collaborator was Dr. Samuel H. Elbert of the University of Hawaii who studied the language with her. Both were published by the University Press.

“IT IS such a relief,” Kawena began in the light, unhurried conversational tones of a Hawaiian tutu, “to have the dictionaries finished.”

But her dark eyes sparkled with the intensity of the scholar as she added, “now I can go ahead with the Kamakau.”

She explained that some years ago she translated the writings on Hawaiian religion, arts and crafts by the early Hawaiian author, Samuel Kamakau. Now she is reviewing the work for publication with Dorothy Barrere of the Bishop Museum.

“AND THERE are lots of other things I want to do, too,” she said with characteristic forward-looking zeal.

Kawena is modest about looking backward. But the record shows 40 years of persistent, scholarly accomplishment as researcher, translator, compiler and writer of authentic Hawaiiana.

Thirty-seven titles in Bishop Museum listings covering ethnology, sociology, natural history and linguistics are the work of Mary Pukui alone or in collaboration with scientists and other writers.

HER MOTIVATION is the urgency she feels to research and record all possible knowledge of the indigenous culture of Hawaii.

When she began writing and translating years ago she started a card file of Hawaiian words “for whoever would do a new Hawaiian dictionary… I never thought I was going to be the one to do it,” she said.

Her source material was Hawaiian newspapers and magazines, the Hawaiian Bible, catechisms and religious writings of all denominations, legends, folk lore, chants and writings of early native scholars.

Legal terms and land law terms were translated, and from the modern Hawaiian vocabulary, such contemporary words as “air raid” and “blackout” were also included.

KAWENA, with Eleanor Williamson of the Bishop Museum, also traveled remote areas of the Islands with a tape recorder to garner all she could from living memories about pronunciation and meanings of words.

She says the Hawaiian language frequently is complicated by multiple meanings.

Advertiser Photo by Charles Okamura

MARY KAWENA PUKUI Continue reading

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Outdoor Circle Honors Cherilla A. Lowrey, 1919.

THIS IS THE MARBLE SCULPTURE THAT WAS UNVEILED THIS TUESDAY, A MEMORIAL PUT UP BY THE PEOPLE OF HONOLULU NEI TO COMMEMORATE THE TRULY MAJESTIC AND OUTSTANDING WORKS DONE BY MRS. CHERILLA A. LOWREY IN HER EFFORTS TO INCREASE THE BEAUTY AND ELEGANCE OF HONOLULU NEI. THIS IS A GIFT OF THE OUTDOOR CIRCLE, THE ORGANIZATION THAT WAS PRESIDED OVER BY MRS. CHERILLA A. LOWREY FOR MANY YEARS.

THAT FINE LADY OF HONOLULU NEI IS MEMORIALIZED.

Because of her many good works, the works that cannot be forgotten by a great portion of the citizens of this town, a memorial was built for Mrs. Cherilla A. Lowrey, by the Outdoor Circle of Honolulu and friends, and on the past Tuesday the memorial was unveiled before a large number of visitors who arrived, before the Mission Memorial Hall. Continue reading

My Hawaiian Flag, 1913.

This is one of my more favorite of newspaper mastheads. Kuu Hae Hawaii was a short-lived weekly that began on April 19, 1913 and the last extant copy is from July 4, 1913. It was headed by J. A. Akina, Manager; W. K. Poai, Secretary; and L. K. Kakani, Editor.

(Kuu Hae Hawaii, 7/4/1913, p. 1)

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Kuu Hae Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iulai 4, 1913.

Commemorating Hawaii’s role in WWI, 1919.

THIS IS THE STATUE SCULPTED BY BURNHAM TO COMMEMORATE THE MILITARY SERVICE OF HAWAIIANS IN THE WAR.

In the middle is the commemorative statue for Hawaii’s part it took in the war that was sculpted by the sculptor Roger Noble Burnham. This is that statue that is intended to be placed outside of Kapiolani Park in the area set aside for it by the legislature.

This is the Memorial that Hawaii wanted to stand for all times, something for the people to look upon. On one side of the sculpture is a war leader, and on the other side, a Hawaiian girl. Beneath this is a soldier on one side and a sailor on the other side.

(Kuokoa, 5/16/1919, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 20, Aoao 1. Mei 16, 1919.

The new Makua Church, 1921.

THIS IS THE PICTURE OF THE NEW CHURCH OF MAKUA, WAIANAE, BEING BUILT.

THE NEW CHURCH OF MAKUA BEING BUILT

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Editor of the Kuokoa. Aloha:—Please allow me some open space in your newspaper, the Kuokoa, to insert this little clarification pertaining to the Makua Church. Along with this letter is a picture of the new church being built these days that I want you to also place in the paper with this announcement.

The main reason for this announcement is this: In the month of August, we made a number of monetary requests, and the members, friends and intimates joined and gave their assistance to Makua for this great endeavor, with the approval of the secretary of the Hawaiian Board. Continue reading

Carl Kahalewai returned from Jarvis Island, 1938.

That youth was overcome by weakness.

The Ship Roger B. Taney Goes to Fetch Him.

CARL KAHALEWAI

There was news over the Radio in Honolulu from a small island to the south, that being from the island of Jarvis, speaking of the suffering of a Hawaiian boy, Carl Kahalewai, of a severe illness.

When the news reached Honolulu, to Mr. Black, the person looking after the rights of America in Hawaii, the news was told to a ship guarding the harbor and it prepared immediately for a speedy trip to this little island to take Doctors and medicine to save that Hawaiian boy. Uncle Samuel wasted no time and went directly to work and that ship left last week and went full speed to reach the island to save this boy. Continue reading

Might these be the feathers the Hawaiians were wearing in Salt Lake City? 1898.

CORSETS, HATS AND JEWELRY.

Some Late Fashion Hints—Philadelphia Physician Shows Women How to Lace.

A NEW PARIS COAT.

IBIS FEATHERS.

The promises of May are already being made, and tender hearts who will not have the plumage or bodies of dead songsters in their hats can this spring trim the hats with lovely ibis feathers that cost no avian lives, and are fair to look upon. Of course the purple ibis feathers from Egypt are to be classed among the costly beauties of millinery, but we have our own American scarlet ibis to borrow tail feathers from and fix in our new wide-brimmed hats.

This delicate plumage is, however, dyed many handsome colors, and, beside this and ostrich feathers, to be safely adopted by any Audubonite, we are going to have lovely hats later on trimmed so gracefully and economically with nothing but masses of shot taffeta silk cut on the bias and every edge closely pinked. This piece silk will assume, in fact, has already largely taken the place of ribbon bows for the trimming of simpler hats. Nothing can be more alluringly daring than a sapphire blue felt, with just a yard of cerise taffeta twisted about the crown, perky bows and ends starting up in every direction. Here and there the taffeta was caught down with cheap pins set with mock sapphires and rhinestones.

Nobody yet dares to assume which ways hats are going to tilt for spring wearing, but just in this midseason a tendency is making toward piling everything in front. Thake a look, for instance, at the crowning glory on the head of the model in the braided coat. It is typical of the daring frontage now used. Here the hat brim is of modes proportions; it is the mounting black and white ostrich tips that lend the stately effect. Another hat worth mentioning boasted a brim four and one-half inches wide, and this was turned directly off the face, bent into three perpendicular flutes, and over the edge of the brim, finished by puffings of black chiffon, nodded the heavy heads of half a dozen prize tall feathers.

(Salt Lake Hearld, 1/16/1898, p. 15)

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(The Salt Lake Herald, Number 49, Page 15. January 16, 1898.