I was asked once if other ethnicities put ads in Hawaiian language newspapers…

…I think if you wanted to sell your products, yes, you did.

 

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 39, Aoao 2. Feberuari 27, 1913.
The Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun, Number 484, September 6, 1912.
Hawaii Herald, Volume XVII, Number 22, Page 4. January 17, 1913.

Animals introduced in Ka Lama Hawaii, 1834.

Pertaining to the Sloth [Hiamoe].

This strange animal is born and lives and dies amongst the branches of the trees. They are rare, and live in seclusion in the trees of the deep forests of South America. That is where it lives. Its front legs are long, somewhat like those of the arms of man, it does not reach a foot, its claws are long like fingers. Its hind legs are short. Therefore it cannot walk on land, it can only move by crawling. From that comes its name, the Sloth. Continue reading

Rev. William Kamau, oldest minister in the Hawaiian church, 1940.

[Found under “Aloha Pumehana”]

REV. WILLIAM KAMAU

He is the oldest amongst the ministers of Hawaii’s Churches.

The Haili Church gives its warm aloha to you, oh good father, and so too with Ka Hoku o Hawaii.

[Rev. William Kamau was one of the contributors to Bishop Museum’s Roberts Collection of mele. See this week’s He Aupuni Palapala blog for more information on a new exhibit about the collection and an better image of William Kamau!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/19/1940, p. 1)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 8, Aoao 1. Iune 19, 1940.

He Aupuni Palapala project at Bishop Museum, 2021.

Did you see the latest Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? It mentions Ka Nūhou, the Hawaiian language newsletter put out by the club, Hui Aloha ʻĀina Tuahine at University of Hawaii at Mānoa. That was 49 years ago! Click here for the Nūhou Monday post from He Aupuni Palapala!

E na makua Hawaiʻi me na kupuna Hawaiʻi

…ʻO ʻoukou no na kumu helu ekahi o ka ʻolelo Hawaiʻi. Ka ʻolelo i aʻo ʻia mai ka puke mai, oʻohe no e like me ka ʻolelo mai koʻoukou waha mai.

Hawaiian parents and grandparents, you are the best teachers of the Hawaiian language.
The language taught from books is not like the language that comes from your mouths.
—A plea written by Haunani Bernardino, editor of Ka Nuhou, an English-Hawaiian newsletter.

Haunani Bernardino

Nuulani Atkins

Lurline Naone

Bill Wilson

By Arlene Lum
Star-Bulletinn Writer

Hawaiian is a living language and NOT a foreign one. And if a group of University of Hawaii students had their way, Hawaiian youngsters would be bilingual.

There are only 5,000 people in the State now who can speak the beautiful, musical language and only 150 at the University are trying to learn.

The reason?

“We were brought up feeling ashamed of our heritage,” according to Nuulani Atkins, a senior in his third year of language study. “I hated myself. I hated the Hawaiians. I felt inferior.” Continue reading

Revealing what was lost, 2021.

La Hanau

EDWIN M. DESHA

O Edwin M. Desha, ka  Lunanui o Ka Hoku o Hawaii, ke hoomanao ana i kona la hanau ma keia Poalima iho, Okakoba 18.

Mawaho ae o kona kulana he boki nui no ka Hoku, he kakauolelo o Mr. Desha na Lunahoomalu Samuel M. Spencer of ke Kalana o Hawaii. He lala ku maikai oia no ka hui Liona o Hilo, a pela nohoi me kekahi mau ahahui e ae. Ma kekahi olelo ana ae, he kanaka paa loa oia i ka hana a aole he loaa iaia ka manawa no ka lawe ana i kona hoomaha, a pela nohoi ma kona la hanau.

Me na upu maikai ana no ka la hanau hauoli e Eddie, mai ka papa pa’i holookoa o ka Hoku.

[Did you check out the new “Nūhou Monday” post out from Bishop Museum’s He Aupuni Palapala group? It talks about you can actually see a picture of Edwin M. Desha in the original of this newspaper! Click here to get taken to the page.

P.S. I am amused with the phrase “he boki nui”.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 10/16/1940, p. 1)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 25, Aoao 1. Okakoba 16, 1940.

Looking back to the Hawaiian football champions of 1895, 1926.

WINNERS OF FIRST MAINLAND — ISLAND GRID TILT

Here is the Honolulu team, island champions and victors over the Navy champs from Philadelphia. Top row, standing, left to right—Billie Cornwell, Chris Holt, Louis Singer. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

Captain Samuel Mana, 1900.

A MAN WHO PERSEVERES AT HIS OCCUPATION

CAPTAIN SAMUEL MANA IS ADMIRED

KAPENA SAMUEL MANA.

Sam Mana is one of the Hawaiians who is employed in the Sailing Profession as a Captain, and he is the only one among us who has been at it from a very long time ago, and because of his fortitude, he has been promoted by his foremen, and has now become the Captain of the ship the Concord. Continue reading