Queen Liliuokalani denied lodging at four hotels in New York, 1901.

QUEEN LILIUOKALANI WAS NOT ALLOWED TO STAY IN FOUR HOTELS IN NEW YORK

NEW YORK. Nov. 30.—Queen Liliuokalani arrived here without any previous announcement, on this past Friday, and she was denied lodging in four of the very beautiful Hotels, that being the Waldorf-Astoria, Savoy, Netherlands, and Plaza. When they went to the Plaza Hotel, a servant of the Queen saw her, and being that he heard them saying that they would be going to the Roland Hotel, this boy went quickly and announced that Queen Liliu was arriving. When they arrived at the Roland Hotel, the  secretary of the Queen, Joshua Aea, asked that they be given the hotel’s best rooms for some ladies, and a room close to that room for him and a friend. Continue reading

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Hula painting by Cogswell found in California, 1939.

Cogswell’s Model: J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., is anxious to know if the Hawaiian girl who posed for this painting by William Cogswell in 1892 is still living in Hawaii.—Star-Bulletin photo.

Rare Old Painting Found By Phillips in California

Another one of the works of William Cogswell, whose paintings of King Kalakaua and Queen Liliuokalani are hung in Iolani palace, was discovered by J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., during his recent business trip to the coast. Continue reading

Death of Dr. Matthew Puahakoililanimanuia Makalua, 1929.

POPULAR DOCTOR’S DEATH.

FOUNDER OF A.O.D. TINFOIL COT SCHEME.

DR. MATTHEW MAKALUA.

A popular and highly esteemed member of the medical profession, Dr. M. Makalua, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., died on Tuesday at 30, Warrior-square. He was noted for his philanthropy, and both he and his wife, who died 14 months ago, were intensely interested in all work for the poor. Continue reading

Maui surveying story from W. O. Aiken, 1943.

How’s Your Hawaiian?

By GEORGE T. ARMITAGE

THE COW’S KULEANA

For some time I have been promised a story from Worth O. Aiken, popular kamaaina who, because of the many trips  he has made to the summit crater in Hawaii National Park areas on Maui, was long known as the mayor of Haleakala. And here it is: Continue reading

Death of Frank Pahia, 1923.

FRANK PAHIA WAS CALLED BACK.

FRANK PAHIA.

At 4 o’clock on Thursday afternoon past, the messenger of death visited the home of Frank Pahia, an important Hawaiian, who carried out the work of the people for half a century, and [the messenger of death] took his life breath and left his cold body, the dust returning to dust at the cemetery of the Hawaiian church in Kaneohe, after he was sick for a short time.

He was born in Kukuipahu, Kohala, Hawaii, on the 1st of January, 1847, and at his rest, he was 76 years old and a few days over. He became a widower six years ago, and he left behind three children, Mrs. William Henry, the widow of the first Sheriff of the Territory; William Henry; Henry Pahia, a surveyor; and John I. Pahia, a watchman for the lighthouse.

Frank Pahia was highly educated at the schools of Kohala, here in Honolulu, and finally at the college of Lahainaluna, the school famous in that time as the Light not extinguished by the Kauaula wind.

Frank Pahia held many government jobs outside of his regular vocation of surveyor; he was the deputy sheriff of Hawaii at Hilo, and when he returned to Oahu nei, the was deputy sheriff for 16 years for here in the district of Koolaupoko. He was one of the members of the legislature in the time of the Monarchy for two seasons.

Heeia is where he lived the last days of his life. In 1916, his partner left him and he lived alone until his death.

While he held all sorts of positions, he carried out his duties with impartially and righteously; there was seen at all any blemishes in his work in all the positions he held.

He was kind and had an open heart, and he was a redeemer for the people of this land, and a parental figure for the district in which he lived.

(Kuokoa, 1/11/1923, p. 3)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 2, Aoao 3. Ianuari 11, 1923.