Hawaiian naval flag? 1887.

THE HAWAIIAN NAVY FLAG.

The Hawaiian Navy flag, from a design by Mrs. Strong, contains in the center, on a white back ground, a gold crown resting on a yellow shield. The shield contains a white tabu stick [puloulou], crossed by two red kahilis, Continue reading

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Flag poles stand in wait, 1893.

A MARVELOUS THING OF NO EQUAL!

This past Monday the flag pole of Mr. and Mrs. Kamakaia was raised by the deft work of Sam Kaloa, and it stands with great honor. There are 30 or more flag poles have the honor of being made and put up by our friend, awaiting the day that the wondrous song will be sung— Continue reading

My Hawaiian Flag, 1913.

This is one of my more favorite of newspaper mastheads. Kuu Hae Hawaii was a short-lived weekly that began on April 19, 1913 and the last extant copy is from July 4, 1913. It was headed by J. A. Akina, Manager; W. K. Poai, Secretary; and L. K. Kakani, Editor.

(Kuu Hae Hawaii, 7/4/1913, p. 1)

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Kuu Hae Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iulai 4, 1913.

Kamehameha III’s new royal standard, 1845.

Foreign Office, May 14th, 1845.

Sir,—I am commanded by the King, to make known to you His Majesty’s thanks for the kind courtesy with which you have allowed one of your men to prepare his Royal Standard, according to the national devices arranged at the Herald’s Office, in London. Continue reading

The Hawaiian flag in British waters, 1853.

A Maritime Novelty.—The arrival of the Hawaiian brig Magdalia, Capt. Taber, exhibited quite a Fourth of July novelty in our harbor. It was the first time that the royal flag of the far-off kingdom in the Pacific had ever been displayed in these waters, and a very good-looking flag it is, blending the main features of the American, British, and French national colors. The union is a mixture of St. George’s cross with some other devices which we do not understand, and look at a casual view almost identical with that of the British flag, while the body of the Kanaka ensign shows eight stripes, alternately of white, blue, and red; and, as it flung its folds to the breeze it seemed an appropriate emblem of independence, and a fitting accompaniment of our own rejoicings on the glorious day we were celebrating. Continue reading