Meanwhile, this is what they were reading in English, 1911.

NO RACE SUICIDE IN STONE FAMILY

Mayor Fern’s Multiplying Grotto and the Story of Na Iliili Lanau o Koloa [Na Iliili Hanau o Koloa].

BORN.

STONE—In Honolulu, recently, to the wife of Na Iliili Stone, thirteen Little Stones, sex as yet undetermined.

Continue reading

ʻIliʻili hānau o Kōloa, Kaʻū, 1911.

The Birthing Pebbles of Koloa.

The pebbles of Koloa, Kau are terribly famous for them giving birth, and their giving birth is attested to by a great number of Hawaiian. This however is something mysterious and difficult for the haole to believe, until they witness it for themselves like Thomas. Continue reading

Reminiscences of Haena,

THE STORIED PLACES OF HAENA

Some years ago, you would go by horse to see the wet caves at Haena. Now, the tourists can go easily and get to these wet caves; you travel on the pali to get to Haena.

Now cars can go and look into one of the waters called by the name Waiakanaloa.

One of these wet caves is above another wet cave; you climb up and get to where you can look down and ?????? the frigid waters like ice.

However before you reach this wet cave mentioned before, you will see a dry cave, and that is Maniniholo.

In previous times of Haena, Kakuai, some sightseers ???? into these wet caves, they boarded canoes and entered and jumped into the cold waters. Some people say that the body of the bathers turn white like snow, and the water is very cold when it touches the skin.

It is not known where the water comes from, but there is water there, it is as if these famous wet caves come up from the earth.

Maniniholo is not a wet cave; you can go in it but it is not like before when people just stood at one place, because dirt has been spread, so some places are stable, and it is filled over with sand from the beach. There are a lot of different things that are being told by those writing about storied places of these areas and the stories of the very old past. You leave these caves and you get to the cliffs where firebrands were thrown in the early days of this land. Leave there and then you see the heiau where Lohiau stayed, and now, in that place is the beautiful home of the Brown brothers [hoahanau Balaunu], the children of Mrs. Irene Kahalelaukoa [Ii] Brown before, but recently Mrs. C. S. Holloway.

That is where you see the stone foundation where Lohiau lived, and there he danced hula [???? hula ???? hele] with Hiiakaikapoliopele after Hiiaka sought to save Lohiau, and after he was revived, they left on their travels to Hawaii Island.

There are many fine things in this area of Haena along with their stories which are being greatly sought after by those writing the history of Hawaii.

[This article continues on, but it gets harder and harder to read. Hopefully the original is clearer so one day we can see what the article actually says!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/6/1931, p. 2)

HokuoHawaii_1_6_1931_2

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXIV, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Ianuari 6, 1931.

Queen Kapiolani on Kauai, 1877.

THE QUEEN AT HAENA.

O Lahui Hawaii; Aloha oe:—

While I was in the village of my dear home, enjoying the breaking of the Kahoaloha wave, gazing at the green leaves of the Hinahina of Makana, and the good ways of my dear loving blossom Esther Kanani [Esetera Kanani] who believes in introducing friends to live while doing the good works of God. Continue reading

Koloa, and more on Kaauhelemoa, 1871.

Duck-Shooting on Oahu.—For a country where the occupation of the sportsman is so little followed as here, those who do occasionally spend a day in its pursuit are amply rewarded by the sight of the many beauties of nature of our island. The wild duck is peculiar in its habits, and loves to haunt the lonely solitudes of the mountain fastnesses during the daytime, coming down at night to visit the streams, the taro-patches and the sea-shore for food. One of these noted haunts of the wild duck, which is very seldom visited and never has been described in print, lies far up in the bosom of the mountains, at the head of Palolo valley. Continue reading

Continuation of Theodore Kelsey’s lament, 1948.

A Hawaiian Lament
By THEODORE KELSEY
II

A little seaward of this forbidden domain the face of the father valley-ridge is sadly disfigured by a large quarrying scar, obliterating the interesting light-colored formation of Ka Upena a Maui—Demi-god Maui’s Fishnet.

Continuing down the road a short distance we come to the place where, on the upper side, the large sacred rock of Kane-hoa-lani has been split up. Continue reading

Theodore Kelsey reminisces about his life on Kauai and in Palolo, 1948.

A Hawaiian Lament
By THEODORE KELSEY
I

One of the most cherished memories of the writer’s life is that of himself as a small barefoot boy, when, with his mother, his little girl playmate and sweetheart, and others less remembered, he made a midnight visit from his home in Ke-kaha, on the enchanted island of Kau’ai, traveling in a horse-drawn, vehicle to the far-famed “Barking Sands,” at Mana’ (mah-nah’), lovingly called by the Hawaiians “Ke One Kani o No-hili—”The Sounding Sand of No-hili.” Continue reading

About Kaauhelemoa, 1895.

Kaauhelemoa.

This place remaining until this day to the north-east of Palolo valley and is surrounded by the mist of the cliffs most of the year is famous. In the old stories of Hawaii it is said that there was a supernatural champion fighting chicken of that place, and he was said to be a man-chicken and and chicken-man. He remained the victor before all of his opponents who stood before him; but there came a time that there appeared a champion chicken from Molokai (?), he was but a slim supernatural chicken, and it was he who thwarted the strength of Kaauhelemoa by actually entering the body of Kaauhelemoa, and started nibbling with his beak, and when he got out, Kaauhelemoa was in trouble, and flew to this place mentioned above, and scattered his feathers here and there, and growing there until today is a plant that very much resembles a chicken feather that is not found in other places in Hawaii nei. There is a large pool there and all varieties of kalo grow there until today. Continue reading