Mauna Kea, 1906.

ON HAWAII’S SNOWY PEAKS.

Picture by Gartley.

1. SNOW AND CLOUDS ON MAUNA KEA.

2. ON TOP OF MAUNA KEA.

3. MAUNA KEA SNOWFALL.

4. A HALT ON MAUNA KEA’S SLOPES.

(Advertiser, 2/4/1906, p. 9)

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(Sunday Advertiser, Volume IV, Number 162, Page 9. February 4, 1906.

 

Death of Eda Kawaikauomaunahina Kalua, 1921.

MY DEAR WIFE EDA KALUA HAS GONE.

MRS. EDA KALUA.

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Aloha oe:— Please insert in an open space of the columns of the pride of the Hawaiian people, the Kuokoa newspaper, the telephone wire that announces the news to the four corners of the earth, so that the older siblings, younger siblings, the brothers, and the parents who live from where the sun rises at Kumukahi until where the sun sets at the surface of the sea at Lehua, will hear of this sad bundle of aloha placed above. Continue reading

The famed wauke of Kuloli, Okoe, South Kona, 1923.

THE SINGLE-STANDING WAUKE OF KULOLI THAT IS FAMOUS.

Solomon Hanohano [Editor of the Kuokoa]; Much aloha shared between us:—Perhaps people do not know, or the new generation of this time that moves on, of the nature of the title placed above. Perhaps they are mistaken thinking that it is just a tale [moolelo kaao], like the story of Kamehameha says “nip off the bud of the wauke while it is still young.”

That is why your writer was urged to write to inform the public of the location of this famous place in the olden days of our kupuna. Continue reading

Travels of King Kamehameha IV to see the sounding sands of Nohili and more, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

We hear of the sailing of the King from here, and on the next day he landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night, he sailed to Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They spent the Sabbath there, and joined together and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the weekday, the rode horse, fished; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. That evening, they got on board the Maria and sailed for Kaula. The next morning they reached there. Some of them jumped into the ocean and swam ashore with difficulty, for there was a shark there and it was difficult to go ashore; there is a severe cliff and no bay. The King went ashore amongst these difficulties, ascended the cliff. The chiefesses remained on the ship. Continue reading

Ezekiela Kahale finds a new “barking sands,” 1863.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

New “barking sand”.—Ezek. Kahale of Puuwai, Niihau spoke recently of seeing a new one kani at Kahio and Keaku, that is like the sands of Nohili. This is something very new to be seen in that area.

(Kuokoa, 5/30/1863, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke II, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 30, 1863.

Speaking of Waoala, does anyone know of its location? 1876.

Waoala, Waialua.

O Ka Lahui Hawaii;—Aloha:

While we were living in the calm of the forests moistened by the cold beads of dew of the mountains while we reveled in the sweet calls of the birds and enjoyed the swaying of the trees that were lush with dark green foliage of the forests, as the cool scent of maile wafted strongly from all around where we sat. The thought to write some sentences was induced, and these are they:—

You may be wondering about the name Waoala. That place is in the mountains of Waialua. There perhaps is no other fine place like it, if we are not mistaken. Continue reading

Mary Papa, former student at Waialua Girls’ Boarding School, 1881.

[Found under: “NA LETA A NA HAUMANA O HALEIWA, WAIALUA.]

Aala, Honolulu, July 6, 1881.

Miss Mary E. Green: Much aloha to you and the students of the school, who enjoy the comfort of Haleiwa, my dear home where I was educated.

I have great appreciation for your thoughts which were printed in the Nupepa Kuokoa in January of this year, calling to us, the students of Haleiwa from the time of Rev. O.  H. Gulick until today; and being that I was a student of the school, I am  glad to respond. Here below are the drops of lehua nectar of the bird of Waoala.*

Question 1. What is your name?

Answer. Mary Papa. Continue reading