From the eruption 99 years ago, 1919.

NEWS ABOUT THE LAVA IN KONA

According to the news in the Hilo Tribune newspaper from Tom C. White [Toma C. White] of Kainaliu, he reported on what he and some others witnessed of the activity of the lava these days. The lava is spouting with force from the Mauna Loa side, and it is about 7,150 feet from sea level, and the lava is spewing from six places from the side of the mountain, but these craters are joining together into a large caldera, and from this caldera, the lava flowing out into four branches. Continue reading

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More on the arrival of Pele, 1862.

[Found under: “HE MOOOLELO NO HIIAKAIKAPOLIOPELE. Helu 9.]

Holo mai Pele mai Kahikina,
A kau ka waa i Mookini,
Noho kaua i Kumalae,
Hooku Pele ma i ke kii,
Noho i ke kii a Pele ma, a ka pua o koi,
Kanaenae Pele ma ilaila,
Kai a huakai mai Pele,
A ka lae i Leleiwi,
Honi i ke ala o ka hala,
O ka lehua o Mokaulele,
Oia ka Pele a kui la,
He kunana hale Puuloa,
He hale moe o Papalauahi,
He halau no Kilauea,
Haule mai Pele mai Kahiki mai,
O ka hekili o ke olai, o ka ua loku,
O ka ua paka, o Haihailaumeaiku, Continue reading

On Pele’s departure from Kahiki, 1906.

[Found under: “He Moolelo no Hiiakaikapoli-o-Pele.]

KAU HELU UMI-KUMAMAKAHI A HIIAKA.

1. Mai Kahiki ka wahine o Pele
2. Mai ka aina i Polapola
3. Mai ka punohu a Kane
4. Mai ke ao lalapa i ka lani
5. Mai ka opu la i Kahiki
6. Lapuka i Hawaii ka wahine o Pele
7. Kalai ka waa o Honuaiakea
8. Ko waa o Kamohoalii
9. Hoa mai ka moku a paa
10. Ua oki ka waa o ke akua
11. Ka waa o Kalaihonuamea
12. Holo mai ke au aeae Pele
13. Aeae ka lani, ai puni ka moku
14. Aeae kini o ke akua
15. Ia wai ka uli, ka hope o ka waa?
16. Ia Kamohoalii
17. Ia Ehu-a-menehune Continue reading

More from Evelyn Desha and Steven Desha Jr., 1944.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS [of Kona]

Kealakekua, Monday, May 1, 1944. At Mokuaekaua [Mokuaikaua], Kailua, was where our prayer was yesterday, and it was carried out as usual. The Holy Communion [ahaaina a ka Haku] was carried out with great reverence. There were some malihini as well who came to this worship. Continue reading

More Hokulea past, 1975.

Keaulana: ‘It was beautiful.’

First cruise proves craft a humdinger

By BUNKY BAKUTIS
Advertiser Staff Writer

After the dust had settled from the day’s ceremony and the crew relaxed around beer coolers and luau food, Buffalo Keaulana, one of the two steersmen for the sailing canoe’s maiden voyage, summed up the brief cruise: “It was beautiful.

“It (the canoe) turned real easy. And when the paddling was right and the canoe was moving, it was a breeze to handle,” said Keaulana, who has been practicing sailing a smaller version of the double-hulled canoe this past year in preparation for the Tahiti trip.

SOME OF THE PADDLERS for yesterday’s ceremonial cruise into Kaneohe Bay also sung the craft’s praises. Continue reading

Early days of the Hokulea, 1975.

Canoes blessed, voyaging society tests the water

By BRUCE BENSON
Advertiser Science Writer

At least a thousand people sat silent on the beach yesterday, watching a Polynesian canoe-blessing ritual not seen since the days of Kamehameha.

Then with hoots and hollers from the crowd, a hundred hands tugged on the lines to send a spanking-new double-hulled canoe down the ways and into Kaneohe Bay. After some two years of dreaming, the Polynesian Voyaging Society was afloat.

The society is a nonprofit group made up of everyone from just average folks to highly skilled artisans and scientists and they are all pursuing the same goal:

To attempt to send the 6–foot canoe launched yesterday to Tahiti and back next summer, using the methods and tools of the Polynesians who first sailed to Hawaii more than a thousand years ago. Continue reading

Hokulea! 1975

Photo by Robert B. Goodman for Polynesian Voyaging Society

Not since Kamehameha…

The place is Kaneohe Bay; the date, 1975. But not since the days of Kamehameha has such a Polynesian canoe-blessing ritual been seen in Hawaii. The occasion was yesterday’s launching of a double-hulled craft which the Polynesian Voyaging Society will attempt to sail to Tahiti and back next summer. For more pictures and the story, see Hawaii Report on Page A-3.

(Star-Bulletin & Advertiser, 5/9/1975, p. 1)

Star&Advertiser_3_9_1975_1.png

Sunday Star-Bulletin and Advertiser, Page A1, March 9, 1975.