Reminiscences of Haena,

THE STORIED PLACES OF HAENA

Some years ago, you would go by horse to see the wet caves at Haena. Now, the tourists can go easily and get to these wet caves; you travel on the pali to get to Haena.

Now cars can go and look into one of the waters called by the name Waiakanaloa.

One of these wet caves is above another wet cave; you climb up and get to where you can look down and ?????? the frigid waters like ice.

However before you reach this wet cave mentioned before, you will see a dry cave, and that is Maniniholo.

In previous times of Haena, Kakuai, some sightseers ???? into these wet caves, they boarded canoes and entered and jumped into the cold waters. Some people say that the body of the bathers turn white like snow, and the water is very cold when it touches the skin.

It is not known where the water comes from, but there is water there, it is as if these famous wet caves come up from the earth.

Maniniholo is not a wet cave; you can go in it but it is not like before when people just stood at one place, because dirt has been spread, so some places are stable, and it is filled over with sand from the beach. There are a lot of different things that are being told by those writing about storied places of these areas and the stories of the very old past. You leave these caves and you get to the cliffs where firebrands were thrown in the early days of this land. Leave there and then you see the heiau where Lohiau stayed, and now, in that place is the beautiful home of the Brown brothers [hoahanau Balaunu], the children of Mrs. Irene Kahalelaukoa [Ii] Brown before, but recently Mrs. C. S. Holloway.

That is where you see the stone foundation where Lohiau lived, and there he danced hula [???? hula ???? hele] with Hiiakaikapoliopele after Hiiaka sought to save Lohiau, and after he was revived, they left on their travels to Hawaii Island.

There are many fine things in this area of Haena along with their stories which are being greatly sought after by those writing the history of Hawaii.

[This article continues on, but it gets harder and harder to read. Hopefully the original is clearer so one day we can see what the article actually says!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/6/1931, p. 2)

HokuoHawaii_1_6_1931_2

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXIV, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Ianuari 6, 1931.

Queen Kapiolani on Kauai, 1877.

THE QUEEN AT HAENA.

O Lahui Hawaii; Aloha oe:—

While I was in the village of my dear home, enjoying the breaking of the Kahoaloha wave, gazing at the green leaves of the Hinahina of Makana, and the good ways of my dear loving blossom Esther Kanani [Esetera Kanani] who believes in introducing friends to live while doing the good works of God. Continue reading

Kauai people call the Kuokoa a rag, 1893.

FROM KAUAI.

Kahikina Kelekona—Here I am in the district of Hanalei now, and I am travelling around the storied places [wahi pana] of this famous lands.

The newspapers greatly subscribed to are the Hawaii Holomua and the Oiaio. There are very few who subscribe to the Kuokoa here. You hear the kanaka saying those words that we are accustomed to, that the Kuokoa is a rag; kanaka are not pleased with it. I saw and heard first hand the them saying so.

Continue reading

Description of Hawaii Island, 1867.

TRAVELLING ON HAWAII.

Makawao, September 10, 1867.

O Alaula—Aloha to you:—I want to tell you of some things pertaining to my travels on Hawaii. On the 6th of August, we boarded the Kilauea to sail to Hawaii. It was a fine day; we sailed that day and night.

We stopped in Kealakekua.

At nine o’clock that next day we landed at the cape of Kaawaloa. We had many  thoughts when we saw that place famous in the old days. We entered the house of a chiefess, Mrs. L. K. Pratt, my schoolmate in days past. We shared aloha; we at oranges [alani] and melon [ipu], and smelled the wind of Kaawaloa, and we all boarded the steamship. Continue reading

Sereno E. Bishop reports on Nihoa, 1885.

BIRD ISLAND.

Geological and Topographical Report Upon Nihoa, or Bird Island.

Surveyed July 22, 1885, by Sereno E. Bishop.

Hon. W. D. Alexander, Surveyor-General of the Hawaiian Kingdom:

Sir: I was employed by you to proceed with the excursion party of H. R. H. Princess Liliuokalani, Mr. Jaeger and others, to Nihoa, or Bird Island, per steamer Iwalani, and make such topographical survey thereof as circumstances should allow, also to observe the geology of the island. Continue reading

Speaking of Waoala, does anyone know of its location? 1876.

Waoala, Waialua.

O Ka Lahui Hawaii;—Aloha:

While we were living in the calm of the forests moistened by the cold beads of dew of the mountains while we reveled in the sweet calls of the birds and enjoyed the swaying of the trees that were lush with dark green foliage of the forests, as the cool scent of maile wafted strongly from all around where we sat. The thought to write some sentences was induced, and these are they:—

You may be wondering about the name Waoala. That place is in the mountains of Waialua. There perhaps is no other fine place like it, if we are not mistaken. Continue reading