Clarice Taylor talks of Kilauea place names, 1959.

Clarice B. Taylor’s
Tales about Hawaii

Place Names About Kilauea Crater

Another attempt to destroy Pele and her volcanic fires crops up in a little known legend which comes from the Island of Kauai.

After the death of the Chief Kaha-wali in a lava flow at Puna, Hawaii, the Kauai chiefs determined to make an end to Pele and her antics.

Kauai in those days was famous for having Kahunas (priests) of great spiritual powers. The people of Kauai believed they were strong enough to cope with Pele. So six priests were selected and sent to Hawaii with instructions to go to Kilauea and surround Pele. Continue reading

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Holua race between Kahawali and Pele, 1930.

THE WOMAN OF THE CRATER.

One day when Pele was in her crater home, she heard a racket. She took upon the usual attire of women and stood atop a hill to look, and she saw an alii sledding on his holua down a cliff, and when he reached the bottom of the cliff, the people cheered.

When that alii reached the place where Pele stood on top of the cliff, he said I challenge you to sledding.

Kahawali turned and said, “Come.” Continue reading

Volcanic activity, 1919.

Kilauea Displays Renewed Activity

According to a radiogram received by L. W. de Vis-Norton Wednesday night, a wonderful spectacle is developing at Halemaumau. The lava has risen to within 200 feet of the rim of the pit, and hundreds of fountains are in violent action. Continue reading

Eruption 150 years ago, 1868.

THE ERUPTION!

Up to Wednesday, 29th ult., there has been no further accounts of volcanic action on Hawaii. The earthquakes have ceased in violence and frequency, although the whole islands is still moved by slight vibrations. There was a smart shock felt in Kohala on Thursday, also the same day, a slight vibration here in Honolulu.

There are reports that the lava has again broken out in Kapapala, but we do not credit it.

We are happy to give our readers a clear and intelligent account of the late volcanic action on Hawaii, from the pen of the Hon. William Hillebrand, M. D., who has just returned from a close examination of the disturbed districts.

The account of the lava fissure at Kahuku, is entirely new to the public. H. I. M.’s Commissioner and Consul, M. Beranger, who made the tour with Dr. Hillebrand, has made a number of sketches of the most interesting volcanic appearances. Continue reading

A. A. Montano pictures of Kilauea! 1881.

[Found under: “ISLAND LOCALS.: About Town.”]

We have on our table a very fine set of photos of Kilauea Volcano, and some distant views of the lava flow, as well as some of the pahoehoe, taken by Montano. Truly our photographers are adventurous. Mr. Montano has certainly struck out a bold line in taking Kilauea.

[This is something I would like to see. Anybody know of any?]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 8/31/1881, p. 3)

HawaiianGazette_8_31_1881_3

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XVII, Number 35, Page 3. August 31, 1881.

All kinds of random things in the local news column, 1866.

LOCAL  NEWS.

The number of whaling ships docked in the harbor by our count yesterday reached a total of 30.

Some haole people went touring aboard the warship Vanderbilt on this past Tuesday and Wednesday.

We saw a number of new Pianos in the Shop of Melchers & Co. being for sale to those who want them.

Queen Emalani returned to the premises of her mother, that being the estate of Dr. Rooke [Kauka Ruka]. She is there where she is finding comfort and it is there that she is finding relaxation.

Habor Dredger.—The Kaulu is performing its duties in digging up the mud from our harbor. But it is now seaside of Ainahou where it is cleaning. Continue reading

Nene being cared for by Herbert Shipman, etc. 1941.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Meahou o Hamakua Ame Kohala” by Mrs. Reinhardt.]

Last week, two men living and working at the Kilauea National Park came to Honokaa School, their names being Gunther Olsen and friend. The school was filled with its 496 students from 1st grade to 6th, to see pictures of the mountains of this island. Olsen described the different birds while his companion showed pictures of the birds on a white cloth. Truly beautiful were the pictures of the mamo, O-o, Elepaio, Iiwi, Apapane, and so forth. The names of the birds of ours were clearly pronounced in Hawaii by that man.

According what was said by this man, in Keaau is being cared for at the home of Herbert Shipman, NENE birds, which are believed to be going extinct, but they are increasing. Our birds were much more beautiful in the olden days before other birds were imported from all over, the birds that are a problem for the crops growing in our gardens. They eat flowers of the peppers [nioi], and that is why the nioi doesn’t fruit as they did in years past.

After the pictures of the birds were shown, pictures were shown of the burning fires of Pele atop Mokuaweoweo last year. These men climbed up Mokuaweoweo on horseback and when they reached a certain point, the horses were left and they went on foot until the crater. Where they were was scorching. While the fires were boiling, snow was seen on both sides covering the ground. Continue reading