Madame Pele stirring up the fire of the pit, 1921.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

According to news reported here in Honolulu, Madame Pele continues to stir up the fire of the pit, these past days, with beautiful scenes of the lava observed by the visitors from the Volcano House.

(Kuokoa, 1/7/1921, p.  4)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIX, Helu 1, Aoao 4. Ianuari 7, 1921.

The original haole newspaper article, 1868.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS”]

The Volcano.—By the following letter from Sheriff Coney, of Hilo, written on the 18th instant, we have a brief account of the volcanic movements on Hawaii. The volcano is slumbering, but restless enough to show that another eruption of lava may occur before quiet is restored to the mountain. Mr. Richardson is an acurate observer, and we can rely upon his statements:

“Mr. Richardson, of Kapapala, in the Kau district, arrived here on Saturday night. He reports Kau still shaking, Continue reading

H. L. Chase, photographer, 1869.

AT THE PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY

On Fort Street,

MAY BE SEEN THE VIEWS taken of the Late

Lava Flow at Kahuku,

And the Effects of the Late

Earthquake at Waiohinu, Kau.

Views of Kilauea and other places. Also Cards of the Kings, Queens, Chiefs, etc., all for sale at low prices. Also, Oval and Square Frames of all sizes, which will be sold cheap.

H. L. CHASE.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/13/1869, p. 1)

HawaiianGazette_1_13_1869_1.png

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume IV, Number 52, Page 1. January 13, 1869.

Clarice Taylor talks of Kilauea place names, 1959.

Clarice B. Taylor’s
Tales about Hawaii

Place Names About Kilauea Crater

Another attempt to destroy Pele and her volcanic fires crops up in a little known legend which comes from the Island of Kauai.

After the death of the Chief Kaha-wali in a lava flow at Puna, Hawaii, the Kauai chiefs determined to make an end to Pele and her antics.

Kauai in those days was famous for having Kahunas (priests) of great spiritual powers. The people of Kauai believed they were strong enough to cope with Pele. So six priests were selected and sent to Hawaii with instructions to go to Kilauea and surround Pele. Continue reading

Holua race between Kahawali and Pele, 1930.

THE WOMAN OF THE CRATER.

One day when Pele was in her crater home, she heard a racket. She took upon the usual attire of women and stood atop a hill to look, and she saw an alii sledding on his holua down a cliff, and when he reached the bottom of the cliff, the people cheered.

When that alii reached the place where Pele stood on top of the cliff, he said I challenge you to sledding.

Kahawali turned and said, “Come.” Continue reading

Volcanic activity, 1919.

Kilauea Displays Renewed Activity

According to a radiogram received by L. W. de Vis-Norton Wednesday night, a wonderful spectacle is developing at Halemaumau. The lava has risen to within 200 feet of the rim of the pit, and hundreds of fountains are in violent action. Continue reading

Eruption 150 years ago, 1868.

THE ERUPTION!

Up to Wednesday, 29th ult., there has been no further accounts of volcanic action on Hawaii. The earthquakes have ceased in violence and frequency, although the whole islands is still moved by slight vibrations. There was a smart shock felt in Kohala on Thursday, also the same day, a slight vibration here in Honolulu.

There are reports that the lava has again broken out in Kapapala, but we do not credit it.

We are happy to give our readers a clear and intelligent account of the late volcanic action on Hawaii, from the pen of the Hon. William Hillebrand, M. D., who has just returned from a close examination of the disturbed districts.

The account of the lava fissure at Kahuku, is entirely new to the public. H. I. M.’s Commissioner and Consul, M. Beranger, who made the tour with Dr. Hillebrand, has made a number of sketches of the most interesting volcanic appearances. Continue reading