Death of Clarence William Kinney, 1942.

Isle Composer Dies; Aged 63

Clarence W. Kinney Victim of Heart Attack

Clarence W. Kinney, 63, died of a heart attack at the home of his son, Clarence P. Kinney, 1133 First Avenue, late Saturday afternoon. The body will be on view at the Borthwick Mortuary after 9 a. m. Monday. Funeral services will be conducted by William Waddoups of the Latter Day Saints at 2:30 o’clock, burial in Diamond Head cemetery. Continue reading

“Nohea” and “Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona” being performed, 1920.

Band Concert

The Hawaiian Band will give a concert at 3 o’clock this afternoon in Kapiolani Park, the program for the occasion being the following:

Old Hundred

March—United Liberty, Losey
(a) Mystery, Johnson
(b) Starlight Love, Denni
Song—That Wonderful Mother of Mine, Gooding
Overture—William Tell, Rossini
Songs—Band Glee Club
(a) Nuuanu Waipuna, Major Kealakai
(b) Nohea, Queen Liliu
(c) Uluhua, Robert
(d) Ko Ua kilihune o kona [Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona], Queen Liliu
Clarinet Solo—Somnambula, Thornton
Waltz—Jolly Fellows, Vollstedt
Intermezzo—Elegante, Offenbach
March—Bright Eyes, Hoschna
Hawaii Ponoi
The Star Spangled Banner

(PCA, 12/12/1920, p. 3)

Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume LXIII, Number 12170, Page 3. December 12, 1920.

Queen Liliuokalani’s composition not credited here in original or translation, 1867.

Hawaiian Music.—It is something to hear of Hawaiians, who but a few years ago, as a nation, possessed no other songs but the semi-barbarous Meles of their ancestors, and no other music than the montonous “ah—ah,——o—oo—u—uu,” of former years,—it is something pleasingly new to have to note the appearance of a neatly lithographed sheet of music for sale in the bookstore, both the words and music of which were composed by a Hawaiian lady. The title describes the sentiments expressed in the composition—”He Mele Lahui Hawaii,” or, in English, “A Hawaiian National Hymn.” Continue reading

Hawaiian National Hymn, 1883.

KE MELE LAHUI.

Composed by Her Highness
Princess Liliuokalani.

1.

Ka Makua Mana Loa
Maliu mai ia makou
E Haliu aku nei
Me ka naau haahaa
E mau ka maluhia
O nei Paeaina
Mai Hawaii a Niihau
Malalo o Kou malu
E Ola! E Ola ka Moi!

Cho.—E mau ke Ea o ka Aina
Ma Kou pono mau
A ma Kou mana nui
E Ola! E Ola ka Moi. Continue reading

Political ad, 1914.

Charles Kahiliaulani Notley

HE ALOHA KA’U ANOAI

Hiolo na wai a ka opua
Hanini ka ua i Mana
Hanini na Pola a ke Koae
Hanini Puuwaawaa i ka uka o Puako,
O ke ko paha ia o ka’u moe
Ua ike au ia Kalanamaihiki
Hiki mai la no au e ke aloha—e,
O ke aloha wale no ka’u i puolo mai la.

I hookahi kahi ke aloha
I hookahi kahi ka manao
E koho ia Kahiliaulani

(Holomua, 9/5/1914, p. 7)

Ka Holomua, Buke I, Helu 49, Aoao 7. Sepatemaba 5, 1914.

The pillow mele for Kaahumanu, and the power of the newspapers, 1907.

One reason why the newspapers were/are so important was because they were “immediate,” just as I suppose Facebook and Twitter is today. One person claims something in the newspaper one day, and a few days later you could see more information or contradicting information by someone else, and not necessarily even in the same newspaper. Because people back in the day wanted the latest news, they would subscribe to the different newspapers being printed at the time, or at least would share them with each other. Continue reading

Speaking of mokihana, 1925.

“Lei I Ka Mokihana,” Song of Kauai, Comes Out in Print; to Send Copies to John Rodgers

A little over two months after “Lei I Ka Mokihana” was sung by the Kauai Hawaiian Chorus, winner of the recent Territorial contest held at the Oliver’s Tabernacle, at the Kawaiahao church and the KGU station at The Advertiser, on the evening of the 16th of July last, the first printed copies were received from Scholz, Erickson & Co., of San Francisco, about two weeks ago when Comdr. Rodgers and his crew of the PN-9-1 were found. Continue reading