The chiefs sail to Kailua, 1846.

The Chiefs. The Chiefs landed in Kailua on this past  15th of May; there was a 22-gun salute.

Puhi was tried for murder at Kau, earlier, and he was found guilty, pertaining to murder. How sad is the end of those who do wrong! Continue reading

Earlier article about William Hodges, 1862.

—On the 30th of April another case occurred near Hanalei, Kauai, which, though it did not result in murder, shows that the natives are rapidly progressing in all the attendant arts of civilization. A colored man of Wainiha, named William Hodges, and a married man, Continue reading

More on William Hodges, 1862.

Attempt at Strangling.—We learn that on the 30th ult., at Wainiha, Kauai, a colored man, named William Hodges, narrowly escaped being strangled by having had a lasso put around his head, while asleep, by parties operating from outside the house, assisted by some one of the inmates. Investigation of the parties is now being held.

(Polynesian, 5/10/1862, p. 3)

Polynesian_5_10_1862_3.png

Polynesian, Volume XIX, Number 2, Page 3. May 10, 1862.

More on Katsu Goto, 1889.

THAT MURDER AT HAMAKUA.

The body of the Japanese doctor* Goto at Hamakua was found dangling, killed by unknown people; news was received this week that three haole sugar plantation workers suspects were arrested, and they are being brought from Laupahoehoe aboard the Kinau to be detained at the Hilo jail.

Their names are T. G. Steel [T. G. Steele], J. Richmond and W. C. Blabon.

By the kindness of Mr. J. Kaulahea, we received the letter below from one of his friends in Honokaa:

The news of Honokaa nei is that a Hawaiian and haole are being arrested, suspected that they beat and hung the Japanese from the telephone pole.

These are who were arrested and taken to Hilo: 1 Hawaiian and 3 haole. However the arrests amongst the haole are not over. Continue reading

Slide show, ice cream, and some violence, 1908.

TEN DOLLARS FINE FOR ASSAULT

Because Charles Santos, Portuguese, caused harm upon Wong Ping, a Chinese who is employed at the office of immigration [keena hoopae limahana], he was fined ten dollars on this past Monday before the Police Court [Aha Hoomalu].

This Portuguese man was arrested previously for punching and breaking the jaw of another, and he spent ten months in Kawa for that crime of his, and ten more dollars for this further injury.

Wong Ping and a friend of his and the daughters of this friend were watching a slide show [kii hooleleaka], and from there they went to eat ice cream [aikalima] at the Japanese shop. Continue reading

Missing newspapers leave holes in histories, 1881.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS”]

We have received from P. R. Holi of Kauai, a response to the Elele, and what it published about him; this is his response which we accepted with great import: It is true, it was my friend and I who brought Kamahueeu, a person inflicted with leprosy [mai pake], and some other sick ones from Hanapepe without any problem to Lihue to the Sheriff [Makai nui], and then after completing this duty for him, I returned home; it was not me who caused him harm, it was some other officer; therefore, the Elele was totally misdirected in its publishing this, and the one who wrote the story was mistaken.

[Hopefully the missing years of the newspaper “Ka Nupepa Elele” (1879–1885), which includes the year the article referred to here appears, will not be missing forever! Might anyone have any ideas where these might be found?

It also should be noted that responding to a news article appearing in one newspaper in another paper like the response above, was a very common practice.]

(Kuokoa, 11/26/1881, p. 3)

Ua loaa mai ia makou mai a P. R. Holi...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XX, Helu 48, Aoao 3. Novemaba 26, 1881.