Despicable, 1917.

HEINOUS ACT

Honolulu,  Nov. 1—One of the most heinous acts was carried out by some people who know nothing of honor, or who know no fear of doing evil, by them breaking down the door of the Crypt of King Lunalilo at Kawaiahao, Continue reading

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More on Katsu Goto, 1889.

THAT MURDER AT HAMAKUA.

The body of the Japanese doctor* Goto at Hamakua was found dangling, killed by unknown people; news was received this week that three haole sugar plantation workers suspects were arrested, and they are being brought from Laupahoehoe aboard the Kinau to be detained at the Hilo jail.

Their names are T. G. Steel [T. G. Steele], J. Richmond and W. C. Blabon.

By the kindness of Mr. J. Kaulahea, we received the letter below from one of his friends in Honokaa:

The news of Honokaa nei is that a Hawaiian and haole are being arrested, suspected that they beat and hung the Japanese from the telephone pole.

These are who were arrested and taken to Hilo: 1 Hawaiian and 3 haole. However the arrests amongst the haole are not over. Continue reading

Slide show, ice cream, and some violence, 1908.

TEN DOLLARS FINE FOR ASSAULT

Because Charles Santos, Portuguese, caused harm upon Wong Ping, a Chinese who is employed at the office of immigration [keena hoopae limahana], he was fined ten dollars on this past Monday before the Police Court [Aha Hoomalu].

This Portuguese man was arrested previously for punching and breaking the jaw of another, and he spent ten months in Kawa for that crime of his, and ten more dollars for this further injury.

Wong Ping and a friend of his and the daughters of this friend were watching a slide show [kii hooleleaka], and from there they went to eat ice cream [aikalima] at the Japanese shop. Continue reading

Missing newspapers leave holes in histories, 1881.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS”]

We have received from P. R. Holi of Kauai, a response to the Elele, and what it published about him; this is his response which we accepted with great import: It is true, it was my friend and I who brought Kamahueeu, a person inflicted with leprosy [mai pake], and some other sick ones from Hanapepe without any problem to Lihue to the Sheriff [Makai nui], and then after completing this duty for him, I returned home; it was not me who caused him harm, it was some other officer; therefore, the Elele was totally misdirected in its publishing this, and the one who wrote the story was mistaken.

[Hopefully the missing years of the newspaper “Ka Nupepa Elele” (1879–1885), which includes the year the article referred to here appears, will not be missing forever! Might anyone have any ideas where these might be found?

It also should be noted that responding to a news article appearing in one newspaper in another paper like the response above, was a very common practice.]

(Kuokoa, 11/26/1881, p. 3)

Ua loaa mai ia makou mai a P. R. Holi...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XX, Helu 48, Aoao 3. Novemaba 26, 1881.

Halloween mayhem, 1933.

PRANKSTERS DO MISCHIEF UPON THE SHADE TREES

Once again the beautification of Honolulu was marred according to what was made known in the morning of this past Wednesday by Mrs. Charles Wilder, the commissioner of shade trees.

The members of the commission found seven fine trees planted on Dillingham Boulevard [Alanui Kilinihama] all cut down. These trees were about ten feet tall, and they were destroyed on this past Hallowe’en night.

This sort of mischief done all over this town was made known to the commission in the past; however, this recent wicked deed was by far the worst.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 11/9/1933, p. 1)

HANAINO KA POE KOLOHE I NA KUMULAAU MALUMALU

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 6, Helu 28, Aoao 1. Nowemapa 9, 1933.

The tiny disclaimer from the original Daily Alta California, 1884.

The narrative on the first page shows what might be accomplished in the Hawaiian Kingdom by a small body of desperadoes.

[This wasn’t easy to find. I wonder how many readers of that day actually noticed it…]

(Daily Alta California, 12/15/1884, p. 4)

The narrative on the first page...

Daily Alta California, Volume XXXVII, Number 12664, Page 4. December 15, 1884.

Response from the Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 1884.

The Gazette, always our neighbor, sometimes our friend, has very generously called attention to our enterprise in giving the “Alta Hoax” to the public just one hour after the arrival of the Alameda. We are truly grateful for some small favors, and in returns for the italicized notice of our friendly neighbor, we will give due publicity to the following,  clipped from its columns, with our illustrations bracketed between:

“TRUE CRITICISM.

“The following definition of ‘true criticism’ is clipped from one of our exchanges and is given herewith for the benefit of the writer of the editorials in the Gazette:

“Criticism differs from defamation in the following particulars:

“!. Criticism deals with such things as invite public attention, or call for public comment.”

(“That the Government organ, the Advertiser, is hand in glove with the perpetrator of the “Piracy” hoax, published in the S. F. Alta, is made apparent by the fact that a stereotype of the article was received at that office per Alameda, and from which the ‘extra’ was printed. Some hoax, more costly, will probably be now played by the ‘four Jacks’ in the cabinet.)

“2. Criticism never attacks the individual, but only his work. In every case the attack is on a man’s acts, or on some thing, and not upon the man himself. A true critic never indulges in personalities.

“3. True criticism never imputes or insinuates dishonorable motives, unless justice requires it, and then only oa the clearest proof.

“The critic never takes advantage of the occasion to gratify private malice, or to attain any other object beyond the fair discussion of matters of public interest, and the judicious guidance of public taste.”

Notwithstanding the snarl of jealousy of our antiquated neighbor, it is the intention of the proprietors of the Advertiser to repeat the enterprise shown by them on Tuesday last. No expense will be spared to furnish the most interesting news within an hour of each steamer’s arrival. By the S. S. Zealandia, we expect something special that will afford further criticism for our out-of-date, old-time-custom, weekly contemporary.

[I have not found the actual special issue of the PCA printed on 12/23/1884, soon after the arrival of the Alameda from San Francisco. It might not be on the microfilm, and there may not be an extant copy of it because it was not a regular issue. But stereotypes… new technology arrives in Hawaii!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 12/25/1884, p. 2)

The Gazette...

Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume 30, Number 203, Page 2. December 25, 1884.