More on Katsu Goto, 1889.

THAT MURDER AT HAMAKUA.

The body of the Japanese doctor* Goto at Hamakua was found dangling, killed by unknown people; news was received this week that three haole sugar plantation workers suspects were arrested, and they are being brought from Laupahoehoe aboard the Kinau to be detained at the Hilo jail.

Their names are T. G. Steel [T. G. Steele], J. Richmond and W. C. Blabon.

By the kindness of Mr. J. Kaulahea, we received the letter below from one of his friends in Honokaa:

The news of Honokaa nei is that a Hawaiian and haole are being arrested, suspected that they beat and hung the Japanese from the telephone pole.

These are who were arrested and taken to Hilo: 1 Hawaiian and 3 haole. However the arrests amongst the haole are not over. Continue reading

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Katsu Goto murder trial, 1890.

AN INFORMER’S EVIDENCE.

The Testimony Given by John Richmond in the Honokaa Murder Case.

John Richmond sworn, stated—My name is J. Richmond and I live in Honokaa. I was stable man for Mr. Overend. I was there in October last; I know defendants; Mr. Steele is luna for Mr. Overend; my house i on the west side of the stable; from Overend’s house it is three or four hundred feet; October 28th last I was there; Mr. Steele came after me sometime after I was in bed and asked me to go to the Jap quarters, and told me to watch for Jap and find out where he went to, and I was to carry the information to the schoolhouse; (map shown and Overend’s house, stables and schoolhouse located. Schoolhouse where he was told to go); I do not know what time it was, I had been asleep and no one was with me; I stood by wood pile watching for Jap about half an hour; I did not know Goto; I did not know who I was watching for; I went up and saw Jap come out and get on horse and then I went up Government road to the schoolhouse; I met Mr. Steele there; I was on foot; I walked as fast as I could going up a hill; took me about ten minutes to go up and I met Steele there; I told him that the Jap had started and went towards big quarters; I then said, I will go back and he said “no, wait awhile, I may need you;” I saw him mount his horse; I stayed by cemetery fence and he told me to stop there till he called for me; I sat down then on the edge of the road; there is grass there and a fence; I could not say how long I stayed there, and I saw Jap coming on horseback. He was walking his horse up the hill; I was on the west side of the road and Jap was near that side; when Jap got there I saw Lala, Blabon and Steele rush out for the horse. Blabon and Steele pulled the man from the horse, and Lala grabbed the horse by the bridle; there was grass there; Steele grabbed the Jap by the head, back of the head and mouth, and Blabon took hold of the man’s body; Jap came off the horse kind of on his knees; he was then taken in to the opposite lot and laid on his face; I could not tell how long he was lying there; Jap in the end was hung; this was all done within an hour. Steele, Blabon Watson and Mills carried him up from the road; after they got there they tied his hands behind his back; Blabon tied his feet; I heard Jap say, Pau, pau; after he was down on his feet I did not hear anything more; heard no groan; and then after he was tied he was carried up to the Government road running through Honokaa; he was carried to the makai side of the road near trail and left; this last place is about 200 feet from telephone post; he was laid down and Mills asked me to go over to telephone post and get a rope; it was a new rope about ¾ inch thick; I found the rope at the telephone post; it lay coiled up in coil, and had a noose made on the end; it was regular hangman’s knot; other end was unrolled and one strand was cut off a short distance up; the rope was a new one. (The rope is brought in and recognized as the rope found at the telephone pole.) I gave the rope to Watson; I was gone a few minutes; I took the rope where man was lying; I gave it to Watson; Then somebody said “My God! He is dead.” I stooped down and put my hand on the man’s heart, but could not feel and pulse; I helped to carry him over; Blabon, Steele and Mills also helped; Watson came with the rope; there was no struggle on the part of the Jap after we got to the telephone pole; the rope was crossed over arm at post; Watson cast the rope; Mill’s raised the body up and cast the rope over Jap’s neck and then we pulled him up; I last saw Lala when he was taking horses up to Lyceum; he was tied to hitching rack inside the Lyceum yard; I did not see Lala any more that night.

By a Juryman—The Jap was carried to the same pole where I found rope.

By the Court—Mr. Mills pointed to the pole and said to go and get that rope.

Examination continued—Steele was on horseback; Steele’s horse was tied by Lala right near the road; tied near gate post; other end of the rope was made fast to the telephone pole; I do not know exactly who made it fast; Mill’s made the remark that they would ask the man some questions, and after they thought he was dead, Mills said: “Well, he will not sell any more goods;” the body was entirely unresisting when we carried him; Steele caught him at the  back of the head and over the mouth; Steele was afoot at the time; Goto the Jap was medium sized; kind of slim built; not a heavy man; the horse I could not say as to his weight, but he was about 14 or 15 hands high; Steele was on the same side of the horse that I was; they stopped the horse and the Jap called “Pau, pau,” and Steele caught him by the mouth; the Jap was leaning over the side a little; after the Jap was hanged we stopped around a few minutes; I was told not to tell any one who had done it; Mills cautioned me: after that I went home; the Jap was dressed in light clothes, shirt and pair of blue overalls; I think dungaree pants; I could not describe the hat; I had hold of the fee when I carried him. [Pants shown and identified as same kind that he wore; as to the shirt it was something like shirt shown.] He did not have stockings on; I did not recollect any shoes at all; hat placed I do not know where; Mills had a cap on; peaks and ear flaps to it, and had on kind of cloak. (Cap shown and identified as cap and cloak shown and identified as cloak). I know Mr. Mills, have known him about eighteen months; I have know Steele and Watson ever since I have been at Overend’s plantation; Blabon I had seen once before; I am in no doubt who the persons were that night; I do not know Lala and I have nothing to do with him, and I did not know who he was till that night; I suppose that Lala was told to told the horse; some one spoke to him; Mills called him and told him something in kanaka and he went and took the horses and tied them; Mills said that we will not say anything about it; I spoke up and said we will know nothing about it at all; others assented; after this I went home and that is all I know; I came home and went to bed; from stable to my room about twenty-five feet; I have a window in my room that I can look right out of to the front of the stable; I was woke up by hearing some talking; I saw Steele and Watson leaving the stable; I could not tell what they were saying; I had gone to bed a few minutes after 8 when Steele came and called me first; my work is to get cane tops and feed horses; I had to take care of seven horses; Mr. Steele’s horse was in the stable; the horse that Steele uses all of the time is a white horse; Lala took Steele’s horse; Overend had one white saddle horse and two black horses; horses are cleaned every night when they get through work, about 7:30; Steele’s and Overend’s horses were groomed and cleaned that night; the next morning they had saddle marks on them; that showed that they had been used during the night.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 5/22/1890, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XI, Number 121, Page 3. May 22, 1890.