Meanwhile, the president of the USA is echoing words from the past, 1942.

OUST THE JAPS

We are rapidly getting all of the 500,000 Japanese away from our Pacific coast danger zone, but what about the timewhen the war is over?

A resident from the Lake Labish district told the editor of the Greater Oregon yesterday of a series of raids conducted on Jap farms in that district. We are not at liberty to tell the full story but we can say that many machine guns were found in hay mows and in straw stacks and that a large amount of ammunition and weapons was taken from the Japs, who profess to be so friendly to us and so sorry that Japan has declared war upon us. Continue reading

Arrival of the first Japanese contract laborers, 1868.

JAPANESE LABORERS.

On the 19th of June, the ship name the Scioto [Kioko] landed, 33 days from Japan, with 147 contracted laborers to work for three years. There are six of these people who came with their wives. There was one baby born on the ship during the voyage on the ocean. Continue reading

Letter from the Meiji Emperor to King Lunalilo, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Palapala hoalohaloha a na ‘Lii o Europa i ko kakou Moi.”]

Mutsuhito, by the Grace of Heaven, the Emperor of Japan, placed upon the Imperial Throne occupied by the Dynasty unchanged from the time immemorial, to His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands: Continue reading

On Char with Kauai photographers, 1934.

Kauai Photographers

Several of the leading Japanese photographers on Kauai are pictured above with On Char, secretary of the territorial board of photography, who visited the Garden Island last week to conduct examinations to applicants for certificates and also to investigate the unlicensed photographers on the  island. Continue reading

Death of Rev. Orramel H. Gulick, 1923.

THAT OLD MINISTER OF HAWAII NEI HAS GONE.

After an illness for a number of months past, the Rev. Ornamel H. Kulika, the oldest pastor in Hawaii nei, grew weary of this life, at 93 or more years old, in his home at Manoa, at 4:15 in the afternoon of this past Tuesday. His funeral service was held in the old Kawaiahao Church at 4 in the afternoon of last week, and in the cemetery of the missionary teachers in the back of Kawaiahao Church is where his body was laid to rest for the time after. Continue reading

54 years after their arrival, the old gannenmono are taken for a joyride, 1922.

The Newest and the Oldest

The three old gannenmono go on a joyride in a Cadillac in 1922.

There was coverage in this column last week about Dr. Eijiro Nishijima purchasing the newest 1922 model four-passenger Cadillac (Phaeton) from the American Hawaiian Motors Company, but there is a story about the group of Hawaii’s oldest [Japanese] men sightseeing within the city in this newest car. That is, last Wednesday, the three old men, [Sentaro] Ishii, [Yonekichi] Sakuma, and [Katsusaburo] Yoshida were invited to the Youth Association’s Thursday  luncheon, and on their way home, in front of the Nishijima Clinic on Kukui Street, through the introduction of an accompanying reporter of this paper, Mrs. Nishijima thought it would be nice to give the old men a ride, and with their pleasure, Shuichi Hirano of the aforementioned car company who was present personally took the wheel, and drove the three old men straight down Beritania Avenue. The car was great, the road was great, and Manoa Valley, beautiful. Continue reading

Experiment of Japanese laborers, 1868.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Arrival of Japanese Emigrants.—The British ship Scioto, Captain Reagan, arrived yesterday, 33 days from Yokohama, Japan, with the first instalment of Japanese laborers, selected and shipped to the Hawaiian Government by its Consul Mr. Van Reed. These laborers are in charge of Dr. D. J. Lee and Mr. A. D. Baum, who have taken special care to preserve the health of the passengers, and they have arrived in excellent condition. Continue reading

More news about the gannenmono, 1868.

The Yaconin [Yakunin].—The Board of Immigration have placed Saburo [Tomisaburo Makino], (the Japanese official who came with the laborers in the Scioto), at school at Punahou. It was a condition imposed by the Tycoon [? shogun], in the permission given to our Consul, Mr. Van Reed, to send the Japanese to these Islands, that a Yaconin should accompany them, and remain until the expiration of their contracts. Saburo, therefore, while clothed by his own Government with a responsibility to look after his countrymen, during their voyage hither, and residence here, now that the laborers are distributed to their various places for work, and the call for his services in the management is infrequent, desires to improve his time in the study of the language and the books of the foreigners among whom his lot is cast for three years. We shall have in Saburo an opportunity to send back to Japan an educated man, acquainted with our ways, customs and country, and hereafter to be of service, we hope, in our father relations with Japan. Continue reading