54 years after their arrival, the old gannenmono are taken for a joyride, 1922.

The Newest and the Oldest

The three old gannenmono go on a joyride in a Cadillac in 1922.

There was coverage in this column last week about Dr. Eijiro Nishijima purchasing the newest 1922 model four-passenger Cadillac (Phaeton) from the American Hawaiian Motors Company, but there is a story about the group of Hawaii’s oldest [Japanese] men sightseeing within the city in this newest car. That is, last Wednesday, the three old men, [Sentaro] Ishii, [Yonekichi] Sakuma, and [Katsusaburo] Yoshida were invited to the Youth Association’s Thursday  luncheon, and on their way home, in front of the Nishijima Clinic on Kukui Street, through the introduction of an accompanying reporter of this paper, Mrs. Nishijima thought it would be nice to give the old men a ride, and with their pleasure, Shuichi Hirano of the aforementioned car company who was present personally took the wheel, and drove the three old men straight down Beritania Avenue. The car was great, the road was great, and Manoa Valley, beautiful. Continue reading

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Experiment of Japanese laborers, 1868.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Arrival of Japanese Emigrants.—The British ship Scioto, Captain Reagan, arrived yesterday, 33 days from Yokohama, Japan, with the first instalment of Japanese laborers, selected and shipped to the Hawaiian Government by its Consul Mr. Van Reed. These laborers are in charge of Dr. D. J. Lee and Mr. A. D. Baum, who have taken special care to preserve the health of the passengers, and they have arrived in excellent condition. Continue reading

More news about the gannenmono, 1868.

The Yaconin [Yakunin].—The Board of Immigration have placed Saburo [Tomisaburo Makino], (the Japanese official who came with the laborers in the Scioto), at school at Punahou. It was a condition imposed by the Tycoon [? shogun], in the permission given to our Consul, Mr. Van Reed, to send the Japanese to these Islands, that a Yaconin should accompany them, and remain until the expiration of their contracts. Saburo, therefore, while clothed by his own Government with a responsibility to look after his countrymen, during their voyage hither, and residence here, now that the laborers are distributed to their various places for work, and the call for his services in the management is infrequent, desires to improve his time in the study of the language and the books of the foreigners among whom his lot is cast for three years. We shall have in Saburo an opportunity to send back to Japan an educated man, acquainted with our ways, customs and country, and hereafter to be of service, we hope, in our father relations with Japan. Continue reading

Japanese laborers, 1868.

Japanese.—Dispatches from Consul Van Reed inform us, that he has engaged and will ship for Honolulu 180 picked Japanese for laborers. Their contracts are for three years are $4.00 per month, found and medical attendance, to be taken to Honolulu and returned at end of contract, free of expense. Continue reading

Mrs. William Hall, 1893.

HAWAII.

Mrs. William Hall Tells of the Arrival of Commissioner Blount.

Disappointment Created by the Taking Down of Old Glory.

How Annexation is Viewed by the People of the Sandwich Islands.

The Daily Rumors Which Alternately Buoy the Annexationists and Royalists.

The following letter from Honolulu was written to Minneapolis friends by Mrs. William Hall, daughter of Mrs. C. O. Van Cleve, the wife of a missionary to the Sandwich islands, and has resided on the islands for the past 30 years. Mrs. Hall’s husband is also a son of a missionary. The story of the courtship and marriage is romantic, for Mr. Hall was visiting Minneapolis when he met Miss Van Cleve, and he fell in love with her at sight. He had only a short time to remain, and as Gen. Van Cleve was then out with a command,the impatient young lover made the journey to the general’s station to tell him he had laid siege to the the daughter’s heart, and that she would surrender if the father gave his consent. Miss Van Cleve afterwards went out to the Sandwich islands, where she was married and began missionary labors with her husband. The letter was written early in April, just after the lowering of the American flag on the islands.

Honolulu, April 5, 1893.

Just as we were in the midst of writing for the mail by the Australia last Wednesday, the telephone announced a United States steamer off Koko Head, supposed to be the revenue cutter Richard Rush, bringing commissioners from Washington to the Hawaiian government. This proved to be correct, and hurrying our letters, we repaired to the water front to see what was to be seen.

The streets were full of people and full of flags. Chicago will hardly fly more bunting to the square yard at the opening of the Columbian Exposition. Everyone hung out a flag of some kind, mostly American, though I noticed “The harp that once through Tara’s halls the soul of music shed,” is hanging “mute” on a green field between two brick buildings on the corner of Fort and Hotel streets, and I think likely, if the trade wind continues as vigorous as at present a few days longer, the cord (chord) will “indignant break.” But to return to our muttons, otherwise streets.

One feature of the display was a procession of native women dressed in white and bearing Hawaiian and American flags, marching down to the wharf to receive and welcome the commissioners.

The Rush entered the harbor and took her place in the naval row. The American minister, the consul, and a committee of three gentlemen boarded her from a steam launch just before she entered the harbor.

It soon became noised abroad that only one commissioner had arrived, and he would not  land for an hour or two. There was some disappointment among the natives when they heard that Admiral Brown had not been sent; others did not quite know whether to be glad or sorry that only one man had been entrusted with this mission.

Soon after the cutter anchored, Maj. Robertson, the ex-queen’s chamberlain, went on board and, presenting the queen’s compliments, offered the commission her carriage in which to ride to the hotel. The offer was declined with thanks, the commissioner had already declined several offers of the kind, preferring to ride in his private carriage. Continue reading

More on Katsu Goto, 1889.

THAT MURDER AT HAMAKUA.

The body of the Japanese doctor* Goto at Hamakua was found dangling, killed by unknown people; news was received this week that three haole sugar plantation workers suspects were arrested, and they are being brought from Laupahoehoe aboard the Kinau to be detained at the Hilo jail.

Their names are T. G. Steel [T. G. Steele], J. Richmond and W. C. Blabon.

By the kindness of Mr. J. Kaulahea, we received the letter below from one of his friends in Honokaa:

The news of Honokaa nei is that a Hawaiian and haole are being arrested, suspected that they beat and hung the Japanese from the telephone pole.

These are who were arrested and taken to Hilo: 1 Hawaiian and 3 haole. However the arrests amongst the haole are not over. Continue reading

Katsu Goto murder trial, 1890.

AN INFORMER’S EVIDENCE.

The Testimony Given by John Richmond in the Honokaa Murder Case.

John Richmond sworn, stated—My name is J. Richmond and I live in Honokaa. I was stable man for Mr. Overend. I was there in October last; I know defendants; Mr. Steele is luna for Mr. Overend; my house i on the west side of the stable; from Overend’s house it is three or four hundred feet; October 28th last I was there; Mr. Steele came after me sometime after I was in bed and asked me to go to the Jap quarters, and told me to watch for Jap and find out where he went to, and I was to carry the information to the schoolhouse; (map shown and Overend’s house, stables and schoolhouse located. Schoolhouse where he was told to go); I do not know what time it was, I had been asleep and no one was with me; I stood by wood pile watching for Jap about half an hour; I did not know Goto; I did not know who I was watching for; I went up and saw Jap come out and get on horse and then I went up Government road to the schoolhouse; I met Mr. Steele there; I was on foot; I walked as fast as I could going up a hill; took me about ten minutes to go up and I met Steele there; I told him that the Jap had started and went towards big quarters; I then said, I will go back and he said “no, wait awhile, I may need you;” I saw him mount his horse; I stayed by cemetery fence and he told me to stop there till he called for me; I sat down then on the edge of the road; there is grass there and a fence; I could not say how long I stayed there, and I saw Jap coming on horseback. He was walking his horse up the hill; I was on the west side of the road and Jap was near that side; when Jap got there I saw Lala, Blabon and Steele rush out for the horse. Blabon and Steele pulled the man from the horse, and Lala grabbed the horse by the bridle; there was grass there; Steele grabbed the Jap by the head, back of the head and mouth, and Blabon took hold of the man’s body; Jap came off the horse kind of on his knees; he was then taken in to the opposite lot and laid on his face; I could not tell how long he was lying there; Jap in the end was hung; this was all done within an hour. Steele, Blabon Watson and Mills carried him up from the road; after they got there they tied his hands behind his back; Blabon tied his feet; I heard Jap say, Pau, pau; after he was down on his feet I did not hear anything more; heard no groan; and then after he was tied he was carried up to the Government road running through Honokaa; he was carried to the makai side of the road near trail and left; this last place is about 200 feet from telephone post; he was laid down and Mills asked me to go over to telephone post and get a rope; it was a new rope about ¾ inch thick; I found the rope at the telephone post; it lay coiled up in coil, and had a noose made on the end; it was regular hangman’s knot; other end was unrolled and one strand was cut off a short distance up; the rope was a new one. (The rope is brought in and recognized as the rope found at the telephone pole.) I gave the rope to Watson; I was gone a few minutes; I took the rope where man was lying; I gave it to Watson; Then somebody said “My God! He is dead.” I stooped down and put my hand on the man’s heart, but could not feel and pulse; I helped to carry him over; Blabon, Steele and Mills also helped; Watson came with the rope; there was no struggle on the part of the Jap after we got to the telephone pole; the rope was crossed over arm at post; Watson cast the rope; Mill’s raised the body up and cast the rope over Jap’s neck and then we pulled him up; I last saw Lala when he was taking horses up to Lyceum; he was tied to hitching rack inside the Lyceum yard; I did not see Lala any more that night.

By a Juryman—The Jap was carried to the same pole where I found rope.

By the Court—Mr. Mills pointed to the pole and said to go and get that rope.

Examination continued—Steele was on horseback; Steele’s horse was tied by Lala right near the road; tied near gate post; other end of the rope was made fast to the telephone pole; I do not know exactly who made it fast; Mill’s made the remark that they would ask the man some questions, and after they thought he was dead, Mills said: “Well, he will not sell any more goods;” the body was entirely unresisting when we carried him; Steele caught him at the  back of the head and over the mouth; Steele was afoot at the time; Goto the Jap was medium sized; kind of slim built; not a heavy man; the horse I could not say as to his weight, but he was about 14 or 15 hands high; Steele was on the same side of the horse that I was; they stopped the horse and the Jap called “Pau, pau,” and Steele caught him by the mouth; the Jap was leaning over the side a little; after the Jap was hanged we stopped around a few minutes; I was told not to tell any one who had done it; Mills cautioned me: after that I went home; the Jap was dressed in light clothes, shirt and pair of blue overalls; I think dungaree pants; I could not describe the hat; I had hold of the fee when I carried him. [Pants shown and identified as same kind that he wore; as to the shirt it was something like shirt shown.] He did not have stockings on; I did not recollect any shoes at all; hat placed I do not know where; Mills had a cap on; peaks and ear flaps to it, and had on kind of cloak. (Cap shown and identified as cap and cloak shown and identified as cloak). I know Mr. Mills, have known him about eighteen months; I have know Steele and Watson ever since I have been at Overend’s plantation; Blabon I had seen once before; I am in no doubt who the persons were that night; I do not know Lala and I have nothing to do with him, and I did not know who he was till that night; I suppose that Lala was told to told the horse; some one spoke to him; Mills called him and told him something in kanaka and he went and took the horses and tied them; Mills said that we will not say anything about it; I spoke up and said we will know nothing about it at all; others assented; after this I went home and that is all I know; I came home and went to bed; from stable to my room about twenty-five feet; I have a window in my room that I can look right out of to the front of the stable; I was woke up by hearing some talking; I saw Steele and Watson leaving the stable; I could not tell what they were saying; I had gone to bed a few minutes after 8 when Steele came and called me first; my work is to get cane tops and feed horses; I had to take care of seven horses; Mr. Steele’s horse was in the stable; the horse that Steele uses all of the time is a white horse; Lala took Steele’s horse; Overend had one white saddle horse and two black horses; horses are cleaned every night when they get through work, about 7:30; Steele’s and Overend’s horses were groomed and cleaned that night; the next morning they had saddle marks on them; that showed that they had been used during the night.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 5/22/1890, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XI, Number 121, Page 3. May 22, 1890.