More on Shoji Masayoshi portrait, 1881.

[Found under: MISCELLANEOUS.]

We read that Mr. Shoji Masayoshi, a distinguished painter in oil, is at work on a likeness of the King of Hawaii, as His Majesty appeared in Japanese dress, when he was present at an entertainment given in his honour in the Momiji-kwan. It is added that the artist intends to make a gift of his work to the Hawaiian Government.

(Japan Daily Mail, 5/14/1881, p. 554)

Japan Weekly Mail, Volume V, Number 19, Page 554. May 14, 1881.

Japanese Newspapers, 1895.

Our Japanese Newspapers.

There are four Japanese newspapers being published regularly here, two dailies and two weeklies. Two of their offices are in the uplands of Peleula at the corner of Nuuanu and Kukui Streets; and two are at Aienui, above what was the shop of Chulan & Co. [Kiulana Ma], on Nuuanu Street. When we hear the little bell that sounds like the ice cream cart bell, it is the messenger of the afternoon newspaper. The press in the uplands does its printing using stone [lithograph] like the Chinese, and the lowland press uses movable type.

(Makaainana, 4/29/1895, p. 2)

Ka Makaainana, Buke III—-Ano Hou, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Aperila 29, 1895.

Where is this portrait? 1881—2022

Found in a Japanese newspaper: “Mr. Shoji Masayoshi of Tokyo, a famous oil painter, is painting a portrait of the Alii, the King of Hawaii, looking just like the King when he wore Japanese royal attire at a banquet given in his honor at Momijikwan,* one of the palaces. It is said that this artist will gift this painting of their beloved King to the Nation of Hawaii.

[Does anyone know who this artist is and what happened to the painting?]

*Kōyōkan

(Elele Poakolu, 8/10/1881, p. 5)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke II, Helu 23, Aoao 5.

Fanny Thomas Gulick dies in Kobe, Japan, 1883.

MRS. FANNY T. GULICK.

From the latest news received last week we hear that Mrs. F. T. Gulika has died, the wife of Rev. J. P. Gulika, one of the old teachers who brought righteousness to this Archipelago. Our readers will perhaps not have forgotten the Gulick family in Hawaii nei, and the departure of the two in their old and weak days to go to Japan to live with their children. Continue reading

Meanwhile, the president of the USA is echoing words from the past, 1942.

OUST THE JAPS

We are rapidly getting all of the 500,000 Japanese away from our Pacific coast danger zone, but what about the timewhen the war is over?

A resident from the Lake Labish district told the editor of the Greater Oregon yesterday of a series of raids conducted on Jap farms in that district. We are not at liberty to tell the full story but we can say that many machine guns were found in hay mows and in straw stacks and that a large amount of ammunition and weapons was taken from the Japs, who profess to be so friendly to us and so sorry that Japan has declared war upon us. Continue reading

Arrival of the first Japanese contract laborers, 1868.

JAPANESE LABORERS.

On the 19th of June, the ship name the Scioto [Kioko] landed, 33 days from Japan, with 147 contracted laborers to work for three years. There are six of these people who came with their wives. There was one baby born on the ship during the voyage on the ocean. Continue reading

Letter from the Meiji Emperor to King Lunalilo, 1873.

[Found under: “Na Palapala hoalohaloha a na ‘Lii o Europa i ko kakou Moi.”]

Mutsuhito, by the Grace of Heaven, the Emperor of Japan, placed upon the Imperial Throne occupied by the Dynasty unchanged from the time immemorial, to His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands: Continue reading