Arrival of the first Japanese contract laborers, 1868.

JAPANESE LABORERS.

On the 19th of June, the ship name the Scioto [Kioko] landed, 33 days from Japan, with 147 contracted laborers to work for three years. There are six of these people who came with their wives. There was one baby born on the ship during the voyage on the ocean. Continue reading

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Plans for the building to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the coming of the missionaries, 1914.

New Home Being Built by the Hawaiian Evangelical Association to Cost $70,000

The picture above is a sketch drawn of the new home of the Hawaiian Evangelical Association [Papa Hawaii] to be built on King Street on the old site of the Kawaiahao Girls’ School [Kula Kaikamahine o Kawaiahao], that is estimated to cost about seventy thousand dollars at its completion.

This home of the Papa Hawaii will be built using brick and concrete, and it will be a beautiful house once all the finishing touches are completed.

This house will be build in the style of those of old Virginia of a hundred years ago, like the image above, and it will become a home for all the Christian associations at where to gather.

This new home of the Papa Hawaii will be a center for the many groups to gather during the coming year 1920 when the 100th anniversary of the Papa Hawaii is celebrated, and it is imagined several hundred representatives of the many Churches from around the world will come them.

(Kuokoa, 10/2/1914, p. 1)

Ka Home Hou e Kukuluia Aku Ana o ka Papa Hawaii Nona na Hoolilo he $70,000

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LII, Helu 41, Aoao 1. Okatoba 2, 1914.

One more story from Kalaupapa, 1906.

QUARTERLY HOIKE OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOL OF “KANAANA HOU.”

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Honolulu, T. H.

Please insert the activities of the Hoike of the Sunday School of Kanaana Hou, at 9:30 a. m. the activities began, led by L. M. Painamu, assistant Kahu of the Sunday School.

Group Hymn, 36 L. H.;¹ prayer by Rev. D. Kaai; group hymn, 39 L. H.

Hoike of the Men’s Class, led by W. Paoa; speech by Mrs. Lono Lee Shu; hymn 193 L. H., led by Youth; women’s class, led by

J. Kiaaina; speech, Elia Kaaihue; hymn 126 L. H., led by the Youth; Ahahui H. K.² class, led by Mrs. A. Unea; hymn 126 L. H., led by the Youths (f).

Donations from the Sunday School, led by J. K. Keliihuli, $13.65; hymn 191 L. H., led by the women; Youth (m) class, led by J. K. Waiamau; speech, William Notley; hymn 20, L. H., led by the Aha H. K.; youth (f) class, led by J. K. Keliikuli; hymn 88, L. H., led by the men.

Messages of encouragement—J. K. Waiamau, J. K. Keliikuli, S. K. Kaunamano, of the parochial class, led by Kahu Rev. D. Kaai with this class for the entire congregation. Closing Hymn, 30 L. H.; closing prayer, Rev. D. Kaai.

May it please you that the number of students at this hoike were 44: 7 men, 14 women, 11 boys, 12 girls, and 58 visitors, for a total of 102. The exercise went well, and they were filled with joy for Christ, and it was carried out peacefully.

With appreciation,

NAIHE KALA.

¹”L. H.” most likely is an abbreviation of the hymnal just published in 1902 by the Hawaiian Evangelical Association, “Leo Hoonani”.

²”Aha H. K.” is short for “Ahahui Hooikaika Karistiano,” which is the “Christian Endeavor Society,” also seen as “C. E.”.

[Many of the names that were mentioned tonight at the talk put on at Native Books appear in this report!]

(Kuokoa, 10/19/1906, p. 6)

HOIKE HAPAHA O KE KULA SABATI O "KANAANA HOU."

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV,Helu 42, Aoao 6. Okatoba 19, 1906.

James A. E. Kinney and his ohana, 1943.

At Sea

The picture above is of James A. E. Kinney, the son of K. W. Kinney of Hana, Maui, and one of the writers to Ka Hoku o Hawaii. It is believed that A. E. Kinney is at Sea with the Air Force, doing air surveillance [kilo ea]. He graduated from the air surveillance school in Grand Rapids, Michigan this past April and returned to his post at West Palm Beach, Florida, and thereafter it was decided to send him to sea.

A Hawaiian Youth

James Apollo Everett Kinney was born of the loins of Mr. K. W. [Kihapiilani William] and Mrs. Sarah Kaleo Kinney, at the McBryde Sugar Plantation in Kauai, when his father was working burning cane, and he was 32 years old. Continue reading

Those afflicted with leprosy forsaken by the church? 1873.

Statement on Leprosy, and Resolutions

Adopted by the Hawaiian Evangelical Association, Honolulu, June 10, 1873.

The disease of leprosy in these islands has assumed such an aspect, that it becomes our immediate duty to determine our course of action as pastors and teachers respecting it.

This loathsome, incurable and deadly disease has fastened upon the vitals of the nation. Although we hope and believe that it is not yet too late by the use of sufficiently stern and vigorous measures to dislodge its fatal hold, that hold has become fearfully strong. The numbers already known to be victims to leprosy, the still larger numbers who are undoubtedly infected, the steady, remorseless activity with which it is extending, all tell us with ghastly assurance, that unless remedial measures are used more effective than have been hitherto applied, our Hawaiian people will become in a very few years, a nation of lepers.

Do we consider what this means? It means the disorganization and total destruction of civilization, property values, and industry, of our churches, our contributions, our Hawaiian Board and its work of Missions. It means shame, and defeat, and disgraceful overthrow to all that is promising and fair in the nation.

We are on the brink of a horrible pit, full of loathsomeness, into which our feet are rapidly sliding.

The chief cause of our peril, is not, that God who has stricken our nation with this awful judgment, has placed no remedy within our reach. He has given a remedy, which the experience of wise men and wise nations has made certain. Nay, He has laid the rule down in the law given to Israel by His servant Moses. It is this; strict, thorough separation from us of all infected persons, not only of established lepers, but also of all who are reasonably suspected.

If we obey God’s leadings and follow this rule, our nation will be saved. If we do not, we are doomed to an early and shameful death.

Our great peril is from general ignorance on this subject among the common people, and their consequent apathy and perversity. They refuse to separate their lepers from them. They eat, drink and sleep with them. They oppose their removal and hide them. They listen to the voices of evil-minded men who raise an outcry against the King and his helpers, when they strive to root out the evil thing.

We therefore as pastors and teachers, as an association have a pressing duty. It is this, to teach and persuade all the people to obey the law of God, and separate the lepers from among us, and while striving to comfort and strengthen with the love of Jesus the afflicted hearts of the lepers and their friends, also to teach every leper who cleaves to his people and refuses to go away, that he is sinning against the lives of men and against the law of God. Therefore,

Resolved, That every Pastor and Preacher of this Association be instructed to preach frequently, and particularly to his people, upon the duty of isolating their lepers, especially as illustrated by the Mosaic law in the thirteenth chapter of Leviticus; also, that he use diligently his personal efforts to induce the people to perform this duty.

Resolved, To set apart the 18th day of July next as a day of Fasting, of Repentance before God for our sins, and especially for those sins which promote the spread of this disease, and also as a day of Prayer to God, to strengthen the King and officers of the Government in cleansing the land of this disease, and to turn the hearts of the people to help in this work of saving the nation.

Resolved, That the names of all the members of the Association be signed to this paper, and that it be placed in the hands of His Excellency the Minister of the Interior, who is ex-officio President of the Board of Health.

J. Hanaloa,  J. Kaiwiaea, H. H. Parker,
J. Kauhane,  G. W. Pilipo,  J. Kalana,
S. W. Papaula,  J. D. Paris,  O. Nawahine,
J. F. Pogue,  J. Waiamau,  J. N. Paikuli,
J. K. Kahuila,  S. Paaluhi,  P. W. Kaawa,
G. P. Kaonohimaka,  E. Kekoa,  J. Manuel,
T. N. Simeona,  S. Aiwohi,  S. Waiwaiole,
S. Kamelamela,  J. K. Paahana,  A. Kaoliko,
S. Kamakahiki,  E. Helekunihi,  Kekiokalani,
S. Kuaumoana,  J. M. Kealoha,  S. E. Bishop,
W. P. Alexander,  Ioela,  D. Dole,
G. W. Lilikalani,  M. Kuaea,  A. Pali,
J. W. Kahele,  G. Puuloa,  B. W. Parker,
Noa Pali,  S. P. Heulu,  L. Smith,
S. Kanakaole,  D. Baldwin,  J. A. Kaukau,
J. Porter Green,  E. Kahoena,  A. O. Forbes.

[How have things changed today? How have things remained the same? Find the Hawaiian-Language version printed in the Kuokoa, 6/18/1873, p. 3, here.]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 6/14/1873, p. 3)

Statement on Leprosy, and Resolutions

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVII, Number 50, Page 3. June 14, 1873.