Upon the opening of Hulihee Palace, 1928.

Story of Hulihee Palace Told By Mrs. Swanzy On Even of New Dedication

The Daughters of Hawaii will dedicate the old Hulihee palace at Kailua, Kona, Hawaii, on noon of Kamehameha day, June 11, the ceremony to be followed by a luau at 1 o’clock.

Restoration of the old palace, the site of which was set aside by Governor Farrington for a Hawaiian museum to be maintained by and cared for under the management of the Daughter of Hawaii, has been one of the big accomplishments of the Daughters during the last year. The 1925 legislature appropriated $10,000 for its purchase. Continue reading

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More on Hulihee Palace from Jared G. Smith, 1944.

Hulihee Palace
II

By JARED G. SMITH

Hulihee Palace, Kailua, North Kona, was built in 1837 as the home of Governor John Adams Kuakini, Hawaiian High Chief, wise leader and ruler of his people during the troubled decades when the conflict between Polynesian and occidental ideologies was becoming acute. He was friendly to the missionaries, Protestant and Catholic, building churches for both alike, setting the example of adopting new ideas which seemed to him  advantageous to the Hawaiian people, yet retaining and preserving the old manner of life and the historic pageantry of his court for he was of the Alii, a Kamehameha, brother of Queen Kaahumanu, prideful of place and power and lineage. Continue reading

The new Makua Church, 1921.

THIS IS THE PICTURE OF THE NEW CHURCH OF MAKUA, WAIANAE, BEING BUILT.

THE NEW CHURCH OF MAKUA BEING BUILT

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Editor of the Kuokoa. Aloha:—Please allow me some open space in your newspaper, the Kuokoa, to insert this little clarification pertaining to the Makua Church. Along with this letter is a picture of the new church being built these days that I want you to also place in the paper with this announcement.

The main reason for this announcement is this: In the month of August, we made a number of monetary requests, and the members, friends and intimates joined and gave their assistance to Makua for this great endeavor, with the approval of the secretary of the Hawaiian Board. Continue reading

New dispensary to be built, 1889.

NEW BOARD OF HEALTH DISPENSARY.

A new location where medicines will be dispensed for the Board of Health [Papa Ola] will be built on the government land, Ewa side of Fire Station Number 1 [Hale Kaawai o ka Helu 1], on King street; it will be a more pleasant and safe place for the sick to go to, not like how it is now at Kapamoo, where the building is very small and some have to stand outside.

Henry F. Bertelmann [H. F. Bakalamana] received the contract to construct the building; he was the low bid of $1,700, better than the others.

[Bertelmann is often seen also as Bertlemann.]

(Kuokoa, 3/2/1889, p. 3)

Kuokoa_3_2_1889_3.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVIII, Helu 9, Aoao 3. Maraki 2, 1889.

Makawao Union Church comes to an end, 1916.

Memories Awakened By Passing Of Old Church

June 25th was a memorable day at the Makawao Union Church of Paia because it was the last Sunday during which religious services were to be held previous to the dismantling of the building.

The exercises were especially marked by a beautiful solo by Mrs. Jones, and an interesting sermon of a semi-historical nature, entitled—”The Passing of the Old Church”, by Rev. A. C. Bowdish.

The first building of the church was a small wooden structure at Makawao on the site now occupied by the cemetery. The change of location was made to the present situation for two reasons, first because of the shifting of the center of the district’s population and second because of the present position marks the place where the late Mr. H. P. Baldwin nearly lost his life. Continue reading

The perils of fire in old Hawaii, 1848.

CONSUMED IN FIRE.

Kapalama, July 7, 1848.

O Elele Hawaii, aloha oe. Tell the people and the other Islands of this Nation of the great devastation that happened here in Honolulu last night.

On the 6th of July, at perhaps 1 o’clock at night, three houses went up in flames at the North East corner of town, near the North side of Kaumakapili Church [not where it is located now]. One adobe house and two pili grass houses. The adobe house belonged to Kahehenanui, a member of the church and a widower. One of the pili houses belonged to Kauhema, a church member, and that new pili house was only completed some months ago. The other pili house belonged to Lio and was about three years old.

The fire started at the new pili house of Kauhema on the south side of the structure in the lanai. A candle was burning there and the flame caught on to the wall of the lanai. The fire leaped from the house of Kauhema and caught the adobe house of Kahehenanui on fire, and then the fire jumped to the house of Lio, and those houses were all consumed leaving the house of Uilani located makai of those houses to escape from being burned down; the Church escaped the fire as well. Continue reading

Funeral of Lucy Lusia Lulea Kaiamoku Muolo Moehonua, 1865.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Funeral Performed.—Shortly after half past 3 o’clock, the funeral procession of Mrs. Lucy L. K. Moehonua began from their home until Kawaiahao Church, in the evening of the Sabbath, the 15th of this October. A short eulogy was read by the Rev. H. H. Parker [H. H. Pareka], and after that, the Rev. M. Kuaea rose and spoke on the passage 1 Thessalonians 4:18. It was not long after he was done speaking when the congregation was soon let out and the remains of Mrs. Lucy L. K. Moehonua were taken to be placed in her crypt, Hoakalei.

This crypt [hale kupapau] is the best in the cemetery of Kawaiahao, and in all of the nation of Hawaii nei. It is an unusual sight; it has four gables [kala] fashioned in the form of a cross; one gable faces the rising sun, one to the west, and the others to the north and south. And the cost for the building was nearly $800.00.

(Kuokoa, 10/21/1865, p. 2)

Ua Hoolewaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 21, 1865.