On the new Lahainaluna buildings, 1905.

Pertaining to Lahainaluna.

The school these days is not of that stature of days past, in its functions, and the condition of the dorms, and where they are to be taught.

The school this day, [something here seems to be missing], like something the former principal [Alatau Tamchiboulac Atkinson] stated in his speech on the day the opening of the buildings, “Lahainaluna school is the college for the poor.”

Those words are true, and it is still so today.

These are beautiful buildings, and the rooms are supplied with beds and pillows; the children are to supply a pillowcase, and sheets, and a blanket to sleep with; they have no need to worry about a mosquito net, for each room is furnished with metal mosquito screening, and the lights are electric.

The school begins on Monday, the 4th of September, 1905, and it is desired that the students arrive earlier than that, and if some come late, they will be left without a room.

So too with the new students, arrive before the beginning of school to receive a room. Students from 14 years old and up are wanted.

The Principal,
C. A. McDonald.
Lahainaluna School, July 28, 1905.

(Kuokoa, 8/11/1905, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 32, Aoao 5. Augate 11, 1905.

Alatau Tamchiboulac Atkinson, organist for Kawaiahao Church, 1873.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU KULOKO.”]

Mr. A. T. Atkinson has been made the organist [hookani ogana] for the Kawaiahao Church, and beginning this week, he will perform alone for the first time.

[This is just a tiny episode in the amazing life of Alatau Atkinson. There will be a talk on his life given by visiting author and journalist Nick Fielding at the Center for Biographical Research, UH Manoa today from noon to 1:15 at Henke Hall!]

(Au Okoa, 1/23/1873, p. 3)

Ua hooliloia iho nei...

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VIII, Helu 41, Aoao 3. Ianuari 23, 1873.