Neutrality proclamation reaches France, 1854.

This was found on Gallica at https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k450316j/f1.image

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Journal Des Débats: Politiques Et Littéraires, Page 2. October 2, 1854.

 

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Neutrality announced in Washington D. C., 1854.

RELIEF FOR TROUBLED EUROPE.

It cannot be doubted that the European Powers now so unhappily engaged in strife will be much relieved by the following kind and considerate proclamation of the King of the Sandwich Islands announcing that his government intends to observe a strict neutrality in regard to the war. The Czar will now breathe freer, and France and England may dismiss all disquietude: Continue reading

Neutrality proclaimed by King Kamehameha III, 1854.

Proclamation.

Kamehameha III King of the Hawaiian Islands.

Be it known to all whom it may concern, that We, Kamehameha III, King of the Hawaiian Islands, hereby proclaim our entire Neutrality in the war now impending between the Great Maritime powers of Europe; that Our Neutrality is to be respected by all Belligerents, to the full extent of Our Jurisdiction, which by Our Fundamental laws is to the distance of one of one marine league, surrounding each of our islands of Hawaii, Maui, Kahoolawe, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai and Niihau, commencing at low water mark on each of the respective coasts of said Islands, and includes all channels passing between and dividing said islands, from Island to island; that all captures and sizures made within Our said Jurisdiction are unlawful; and that the protection andd hospitality of Our Ports, Harbors and Roads, shall be equally extended to all the belligerents, so long as they respect Our neutrality. Continue reading

The death of Jonah Piikoi and his autobiography, 1859.

The death of J. Piikoi.

On the 26th of April, the Honorable J. Piikoi, one of the alii of this Hawaiian archipelago died. He was a much admired man for his competence and his determination in the duties given to him. He was 55 years old, and the sickness he died of was of quick pulse [? aalele nui], and problems with his blood flow, and he died.

Before the death of Piikoi, he prepared a story of his life, from his birth until the day he wrote it, that being the 7th of April. This is it below:

The Autobiography of J. Piikoi

I was born in the month of Ikuwa, that being January, in the year of the Lord 1804.

I was born in Waimea, Kauai, and that was where I was raised until the first Liholiho landed on Kauai on the 22nd of the month of  July, 1821. Continue reading

Death of Kaahumanu II, Kinau, 1839.

DEATH.

KAAHUMANU II.

At Honolulu on the 4th of this April.

She became sick on the 30th of December, in the early  morning; the sickness was paralysis. Her left hand and leg became paralyzed, and on the 31st, she was overcome by  sleep: She slept until the paralysis of her left side abated, but her sleep increased until the 2nd of April, and her siblings [? hoahanau] could not wake her. Continue reading

Honolulu Hale torn down to build a parking lot, 1917.

Historic Building  of ’30s to Be Razed Soon
Honolulu Hale Sold to Frank Godfrey for $10

Honolulu Hale, build about 1836 by Kamehameha III, which was sold today for $10.

Historic Honolulu Hale sold for $10 to one lone bidder Frank Godfrey, today at noon when King Kalakaua’s dinner bell called together a small group of spectators to witness the last event in the life of the building. Within 60 days the building will be torn down and the ground upon which it stands will be cleared of all traces of it, according tothe agreement which the purchaser signed after the auction. The auction was conducted by Elmer L. Schwarzberg of James F. Morgan Co. and in the curious crowd were a number of Honolulu’s kamaainas—old-timers. Continue reading

On the birthday of Kamehameha III, 1958.

The King’s Birthday: Was It in Spring Instead of August?

By EMMA LYONS DOYLE

The appearance in Hawaiian Holiday of an article on Kamehameha III two weeks ago revived interest among old timers in a question that in years gone by aroused both query and controversy.

Was Kauikeaouli’s birthday Aug. 11, or was it March 17?

The latter date until recent years this writer believed to be the correct one. It was known to have been observed during the king’s lifetime, with flag flying, celebrations and official calls.

Makua Laiana’s [Lorenzo Lyons’] journal, dated Waimea, March 17, 1849, records: “The King’s birthday. People ordered not to do any work. Public meeting, but Royal Proclamation disregarded by many.”

Kauikeaouli, it must be remembered, was born in a period when time was reckoned by the unwritten Hawaiian calendar, one that was established, detailed and well arranged, but so different from the later-adopted haole calendar that it would not be strange if confusion sometimes occurred.

The August date was affirmed by Fornander, and appears in Alexander’s Brief History of the Hawaiian People. Hawaiian Holiday’s article was timed and written in acceptance of these statements, and its length being limited, did not include mention of the controversy.

In August, 1847, there appeared in the Hawaiian publication Elele Hawaii [10/6/1847, pp. 99–100] an article by G. S. Keliumiumi, vehemently and poetically protesting the celebration of the king’s birthday in March.

He quotes Keaweamahi as one authority, and says in part, “Know then by this document the correct and the truth of King Kamehameha being born on the 11th day of the month of Hinaiaeleele, which is August…

David Malo, in 1847, also disputed the March date, saying he was present at Keauhou when the king was born. “I did not know how to reckon months at that time,” he wrote, but he cited a fishing season and certain events that would mark the period.

Fornander, in a chronological table that appeared in Hitchcock’s English – Hawaiian dictionary, says for 1813: “Kauikeaouli, afterward Kamehameha III, was born on Aug. 11 to Kamehameha and Keopuolani. The day of his birth, however was in after years conventionally fixed for March 17, but the above date is the testimony of his nurse, Emilia Keaweamahi, wife of Kaieoewa [Kaikioewa], Governor of Kauai. (Kamakau mentions Kaikeoewa as the infant’s protector.)

And now for a surprise!

Very unexpectedly, the writer has been given permission to use and extract from the journal of no less a person than John Young:

“Kawaihae, March, 1813.

“News came by bearer a few days hence of the birth of a child who will be declared kabu as an heir to this kingdom’s throne.

“Tamehameha is overjoyed. He declares a great feast and a number of sacrifices, and a time of great celebration.

“Mother and I go to celebrate. Grace is ill today. Fanny, John, James and the kahus shall go with me.”

As this journal probably has never seen publication, it may be that our story represents a scoop on a human interest item 145 years old, a journalistic triumph for a historian.

In any case, let’s hope March 17, 1959, will be duly celebrated. Twice within the span of a year is not too often to remember the good king.

(Advertiser, 8/24/1958, Hawaiian Holiday, p. 7)

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Honolulu Advertiser, 102nd Year, Number 34,394, Hawaiian Holiday, Page 7. August 24, 1958.