W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

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Kamehameha III at Mokuula, 1846.

Court News. His Majesty and suite landed at Lahaina on the morning of the  17th. They were received by the new Governor and the other authorities, under the customary salute from the Fort. His Majesty proceeded to the residence of the Premier, where he rested for a short time. He then visited the large Palace now in progress, and afterwards retired to his former residence at Mokuula. Continue reading

Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

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E o, e Kauikeaouli, ka Moi Lokomaikai, 1921.

COMMEMORATING THE DAY OF BIRTH OF KAUIKEAOULI.

At Kawaiahao Church, on the morning of this coming Sunday, March 13, a memorial assembly for the birthday of King Kamehameha III (Kauikeaouli) will be held, under the direction of the Ahahui o na Mamakakaua. Continue reading

Timoteo Haalilio, 1845.

SOME THINGS PERTAINING TO HAALILIO.

Koolau, Oahu, was where he was born; his parents were prominent people. His father died when he was a youth, and thereafter his mother (that being Eseka who is still living) became Governor of Molokai. When he was 8 years old, he joined the family of the King, Kamehameha III, and lived with them. They were at Hilo at this time. When he was 13, Haalilio entered the school of Bingham [Binamu] in Honolulu, and he studied English and…

(Elele, 4/25/1845, p. 13)

Elele_4_25_1845_13.png

Ka Elele, Buke I, Pepa 2, Aoao 13, Aperila 25, 1845.

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John Smith, flautist for Kamehameha III, and land rights, 1904.

HAS DECLARED THIS ACTION GOOD

INTERESTING CASE BEFORE LAND COURT—A NEGRO FLUTE PLAYER AS A COURT MUSICAN—COOKE HOMESTEAD CLEAR.

Enoch Johnson, as examiner of titles, is the author of an opinion filed in the Torrens Land Court to the effect that one John Smith, a negro flute-player for Kamehameha III was owner of a valuable piece of land on Young street, for which application was made for a Torrens title by C. M. Cooke, Limited. As the negro got the California gold fever and left, disappearing and leaving no heirs, Johnson comes to the conclusion that the property reverts to the Territory. Judge Weaver, however, differs, from this opinion and holds that the petitioner is entitled to a clear title.

The land was granted to the flute-player by Royal Patent 26, on July 17, 1847, by King Kamehameha III. Twenty-five years ago it was used as a pasture land, in the old days when its value was a mere trifle. It is now residence property. When the gold fever broke out in California flute-player Smith gave up both his job as a royal musician and his land near what then was of Honolulu then and left with some other negroes for California. He has never been heard of since and adverse possession has long since run against him or his heirs.

Enoch Johnson, however declares in his report to the court that adverse possession does not run against the government and that the law provides that property left without heirs shall escheat to the government. Here he holds that the Attorney General should be notified and that Smith’s “estate” is escheated to the government.

“I have to disagree with the conclusions of law set forth in the opinion” says Judge Weaver in his decision filed yesterda. “I am of the opinion that the applicant shows a prima facie case of title. The Territory of Hawaii has no title in the lands by reason of the law of escheat, for the reason that no ‘inquest of office’ has been had to take possession of the land. The abstract of title shows that the applicant is entitled to a fee simple title subject to a life interest in C. M. Cooke and his wife, Anna C. Cooke, as set forth in their deed to Charles M. Cooke, Limited.”

(Hawaiian Star, 6/23/1904, p. 8)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume XII, Number 3824, Page 8. June 23, 1904.