Name song for Kamehameha V by Kamehameha III, 1868.

HE INOA NO KAMEHAMEHA V.

Kalani nui Kapuaiwa i ke kapu he inoa,
O ulupuni o ke aloha uluahewa,
O hoolailai e ko mai ke ano,
He ano aloha no kuu makuahine,
No’u keia liliha kumakena,
E luanuu a Keakalaniakau,
O ke kakau uhi kikowana o kewe,
Inoa makapala o Ahukini,
O oe kai luna o Kahakoililani,
I ka he o Mamakalau o Waikulani,
O Waikulani o ka manu haalilo,
Nana ia Lani na Ekamapu,
Na ka manu mapu o Kaulia,
Nana i leleluna o Numehalani,
I lele kohai i ka wa o Lauahea,
I ke kowa kapu o Hinamalailena,
I maka noenoe lani wahine a ma,
E hanini wale ana no ka waimaka,
Aloha oe—Olia? Continue reading

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Thomas Square inauguration, 1887.

Inauguration Concert at Thomas Square

Thomas Square has at last been successfully inaugurated as a public square by the Hawaiian band giving one of its entertainments to a large audience on Thursday evening last. This plot of ground, about seven acres, was donated by the Hawaiian Government as a public square some fifteen years ago, and was named Thomas Square in honor of Admiral Thomas of the British navy, who, in a kindly manner, undid the act of taking possession of these Islands by Lord George Paulet, the British Government endorsing the former and censuring the latter. Shortly after the square was enclosed and trees planted, which was about all that was done until late years, when the Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, who takes a lively interest in such matters, Continue reading

Vermont hears of Restoration Day, 1843.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

Letters from the Islands to August 5, furnish some additional particulars relating to the restoration of the native government.—The doings of Lord Paulet’s Provisional Government were outrageous, and compelled the retirement of Dr. Judd from all participation in it. The following letter is from the Boston Daily Advertiser:

U. S. Ship Constellation,
Off Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 1843.

It is probably known in the United States that in February last, his Lordship Captain George Paulet, of Her Majesty’s ship Carysfort, visit these Islands; and after urging upon King Kamehameha III., in succession, various demands, with many of which it was found impossible to comply, an making preparations to fire upon the city of Honolulu, compelled a cession of the Sovereignty to the Queen of Great Britain, and appointed a Commission of four, of which his Majesty or his deputy were permitted to be a member, for the provisional government of the Island, until her Majesty’s pleasure should be made known; which time the “existing laws, and those made at the ensuing council of the King and chiefs” were to continue in full force so far as natives were concerned,” and to for the basis of the administration of justice by the Commission between foreigns residents on these Islands, and all existing engagements of the King were to be executed and performed as if the cession had never been made.” Continue reading

On kake and Kauikeaouli and Kalama and Kaahumanu, 1896.

[Found under: “NA WAHI PANA A KAULANA O HONOLULU, OAHU NEI, I UHIIA I KA LEPO A NALOWALE LOA HOI I KEIA AU HOU.”]

KAHALEULUHE

5.—Kahaleuluhe was where the Anglican Church stands today, and its stature is hard to picture today. This was a Royal residence during the time of Kamehameha III, the kindhearted Alii who was shown affection through words of kake, because of the fear Kalama had lest she be killed by Kaahumanu and Kinau, Continue reading

This must have been an awesome image, 1875.

SUPERB GIFT

FROM THE

Kuokoa Newspaper for 1876!

This coming year, 1876, the Kuokoa Newspaper, and Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation, will gift to its people who prepay their two dollars, a superb and proud gift, that being Pictures of the seven Monarchs of Hawaii nei, from Kamehameha I, the “Napoleon of the Pacific;” Liholiho I., Kamehameha II.; Kamehameha III.; Kamehameha IV., Liholiho II.; Kamehameha V.; Lunalilo I.; and Kalakaua I. Their Pictures will be all printed on thick paper so that it can be taken care of greatly. Continue reading

The wait continues, 1893–2018.

RESTORATION DAY OF HAWAII NEI.

In the first half of the month of February, 1843, Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki] arrived on the shores of Hawaii nei, and due to some things he thought were right, he took down the Hawaiian Flag and raised the British Flag, and this was the first time that the sovereignty of our land was taken. With that act however, the Royal standard [hae Kalaunu] was left alone along with the Sovereign in His place; this was not usurped; and peace was kept by the Hulumanu, the soldiers of Kauikeaouli at the time, and the makaainana remained then under the rule of the King, and they kneeled and prayed to God for the return of the sovereignty of the land to righteousness. Continue reading