On kake and Kauikeaouli and Kalama and Kaahumanu, 1896.

[Found under: “NA WAHI PANA A KAULANA O HONOLULU, OAHU NEI, I UHIIA I KA LEPO A NALOWALE LOA HOI I KEIA AU HOU.”]

KAHALEULUHE

5.—Kahaleuluhe was where the Anglican Church stands today, and its stature is hard to picture today. This was a Royal residence during the time of Kamehameha III, the kindhearted Alii who was shown affection through words of kake, because of the fear Kalama had lest she be killed by Kaahumanu and Kinau, Continue reading

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This must have been an awesome image, 1875.

SUPERB GIFT

FROM THE

Kuokoa Newspaper for 1876!

This coming year, 1876, the Kuokoa Newspaper, and Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation, will gift to its people who prepay their two dollars, a superb and proud gift, that being Pictures of the seven Monarchs of Hawaii nei, from Kamehameha I, the “Napoleon of the Pacific;” Liholiho I., Kamehameha II.; Kamehameha III.; Kamehameha IV., Liholiho II.; Kamehameha V.; Lunalilo I.; and Kalakaua I. Their Pictures will be all printed on thick paper so that it can be taken care of greatly. Continue reading

The wait continues, 1893–2018.

RESTORATION DAY OF HAWAII NEI.

In the first half of the month of February, 1843, Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki] arrived on the shores of Hawaii nei, and due to some things he thought were right, he took down the Hawaiian Flag and raised the British Flag, and this was the first time that the sovereignty of our land was taken. With that act however, the Royal standard [hae Kalaunu] was left alone along with the Sovereign in His place; this was not usurped; and peace was kept by the Hulumanu, the soldiers of Kauikeaouli at the time, and the makaainana remained then under the rule of the King, and they kneeled and prayed to God for the return of the sovereignty of the land to righteousness. Continue reading

W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

Kamehameha III at Mokuula, 1846.

Court News. His Majesty and suite landed at Lahaina on the morning of the  17th. They were received by the new Governor and the other authorities, under the customary salute from the Fort. His Majesty proceeded to the residence of the Premier, where he rested for a short time. He then visited the large Palace now in progress, and afterwards retired to his former residence at Mokuula. Continue reading

Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

Continue reading