A clear picture is worth a thousand words, 1909.

HONOLULU IN THE YEARS 1852–54.

The picture above shows a part of the town of Honolulu capturing the grounds of what is called now, the Executive Building [Iolani Palace], seen between the years from 1852 and 1854. Continue reading

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150 years ago, people were reading about the arrival of Catholicism, in S. M. Kamakau’s great history, 1869.

THE HISTORY OF HAWAII.

By S. M. Kamakau.

NUMBER 97.

Pertaining to the Reign of Kauikeaouli over the Nation, he being called Kamehameha III.

Pertaining to the arrival of Catholicism, in the year 1827 [1837].

In the month of September, in the year 1836. A Catholic priest [kahuna katolika Roma] arrived, the Rev. Aresaniao R. Walsh [Rev. Arsenius Robert Walsh], from Britain. He were not expelled, but was forbidden by the Chiefs, that he should not proselytize amongst the Hawaiians. But he went and argued with some Protestant priests [Kahuna Hoole Pope]. He indeed converted Hawaiians and secretly Baptized some people. Continue reading

The Hon. Daniela Kahaulelio’s reminiscences of Lahaina, 1898.

The History

— OF —

Lahaina Town

Composed by the
Hon. D. Kahaulelio,
The Judge of the Shade of the Breadruit Trees of Lele.

S. P. KALAMA WAIAWAAWA.

This is a story pertaining to the one of this issue:

King Kamehameha III was sailing aboard an American warship for the Kanilehua rains of HIlo, and along with him was G. P. Kauka [G. P. Judd], the father of the Chief Justice A. F. Kauka [A. F. Judd], was with him; he was a favorite and a translator for the alii aboard the ship. The Captain wanted his officers to explain clearly the length in time and the direction, and while the officers were making preparations, S. P. Kalama Waiawaawa asked the King:

What are they doing? Continue reading

Name song for Kamehameha V by Kamehameha III, 1868.

HE INOA NO KAMEHAMEHA V.

Kalani nui Kapuaiwa i ke kapu he inoa,
O ulupuni o ke aloha uluahewa,
O hoolailai e ko mai ke ano,
He ano aloha no kuu makuahine,
No’u keia liliha kumakena,
E luanuu a Keakalaniakau,
O ke kakau uhi kikowana o kewe,
Inoa makapala o Ahukini,
O oe kai luna o Kahakoililani,
I ka he o Mamakalau o Waikulani,
O Waikulani o ka manu haalilo,
Nana ia Lani na Ekamapu,
Na ka manu mapu o Kaulia,
Nana i leleluna o Numehalani,
I lele kohai i ka wa o Lauahea,
I ke kowa kapu o Hinamalailena,
I maka noenoe lani wahine a ma,
E hanini wale ana no ka waimaka,
Aloha oe—Olia? Continue reading

Thomas Square inauguration, 1887.

Inauguration Concert at Thomas Square

Thomas Square has at last been successfully inaugurated as a public square by the Hawaiian band giving one of its entertainments to a large audience on Thursday evening last. This plot of ground, about seven acres, was donated by the Hawaiian Government as a public square some fifteen years ago, and was named Thomas Square in honor of Admiral Thomas of the British navy, who, in a kindly manner, undid the act of taking possession of these Islands by Lord George Paulet, the British Government endorsing the former and censuring the latter. Shortly after the square was enclosed and trees planted, which was about all that was done until late years, when the Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, who takes a lively interest in such matters, Continue reading

Vermont hears of Restoration Day, 1843.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

Letters from the Islands to August 5, furnish some additional particulars relating to the restoration of the native government.—The doings of Lord Paulet’s Provisional Government were outrageous, and compelled the retirement of Dr. Judd from all participation in it. The following letter is from the Boston Daily Advertiser:

U. S. Ship Constellation,
Off Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 1843.

It is probably known in the United States that in February last, his Lordship Captain George Paulet, of Her Majesty’s ship Carysfort, visit these Islands; and after urging upon King Kamehameha III., in succession, various demands, with many of which it was found impossible to comply, an making preparations to fire upon the city of Honolulu, compelled a cession of the Sovereignty to the Queen of Great Britain, and appointed a Commission of four, of which his Majesty or his deputy were permitted to be a member, for the provisional government of the Island, until her Majesty’s pleasure should be made known; which time the “existing laws, and those made at the ensuing council of the King and chiefs” were to continue in full force so far as natives were concerned,” and to for the basis of the administration of justice by the Commission between foreigns residents on these Islands, and all existing engagements of the King were to be executed and performed as if the cession had never been made.” Continue reading

On kake and Kauikeaouli and Kalama and Kaahumanu, 1896.

[Found under: “NA WAHI PANA A KAULANA O HONOLULU, OAHU NEI, I UHIIA I KA LEPO A NALOWALE LOA HOI I KEIA AU HOU.”]

KAHALEULUHE

5.—Kahaleuluhe was where the Anglican Church stands today, and its stature is hard to picture today. This was a Royal residence during the time of Kamehameha III, the kindhearted Alii who was shown affection through words of kake, because of the fear Kalama had lest she be killed by Kaahumanu and Kinau, Continue reading