History of volcanic activities and why the newspapers need to be rescanned as clearly as possible, 1868–for the present, for the future.

[Found under: “Ke Ahi Pele Nui ma Hawaii. NA OLAI KUPINAI. KE KAI HOEE NUI! MAKE WELIWELI MA KAU! Na Palapala a na Makamaka mai Hawaii mai, eia iho malalo:”]

On Thursday at 3 in the afternoon, that being the 2nd of this April, there came a great powerful earthquake, and people could not stand upright, and so too the animals. The soil of the earth spew up into the sky like smoke and hills tumbled down; large trees fell, and some of the valleys were filled, and houses fell; the number of houses which fell numbered 30 or more; and 3 churches fell, the churches of Kahuku and Waiohinu and Punaluu; and there is a large pit at Kahuku that is 80 feet in circumference and 350 feet or more deep, and from within this pit rose steam like the steam of the volcanic crater; the distance from the port of Kaalualu to this pit is 6 miles or so; and there are many other deeds carried out by God. Continue reading

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Mary Kawena Pukui, 1895—Today.

Speaking of cool things I have seen recently, did you guys see/hear this? Click on the image of Mary Kawena Pukui below.

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Still photo taken from a film by Vivienne Mader, ca. 1930. Image number SCP 103645. Bishop Museum Archives.

 

Hilo women protest, 1898.

WOMEN BOLT.

Hilo’s Patriotic League Repudiates the Central Society.

A committee of the Women’s Patriotic League of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, has made a protest against the memorial presented some time ago by  the Honolulu committee of that organization to the Commission. An English translation of the protest is as follows: Continue reading

Lines of familiar mele used in stories to elicit emotion, 1895.

[Found in: “HE MOOLELO NO Frank Reade Opio”]

Ike aku i ka ono o ka wai o ia pua,
Upu ae ka manao e kii aku e ako.

[I know of the sweet nectar of that flower,
The desire wells up to go and pluck it.]

[The use of lines of well-known mele like from Thomas Linsey’s “Honesakala” above is a feature of Hawaiian storytelling. They elicit a feeling or mood to help the flow of the moolelo. This particular translation of  one of the Frank Reade Jr. stories ran in Hawaiian in the Kuokoa from 5/25/1895 to 11/9/1895 under the title “He Moolelo no Frank Reade Opio: Ka Mea Nana i Hana ka Moku Lele ma ka Lewa-lani…”]

(Kuokoa, 8/17/1895, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIV, Helu 33, Aoao 1. Augate 17, 1895.

Hawaiian translation of A. F. Grant’s “Loyal Ned on the last cruise of the Alabama,” 1888.

NED NIXON

the

Steel-Hearted and the Unforgettable Executor of Orders;

and the

The Final Siege

of the

“ALABAMA,”

the

Fierce Fighter and Fire Breather of the Atlantic Ocean.

“There are two wondrous ones of the sea,
Feared by the Whalers;
The Alabama and the Shenandoah,
Chasing in the distance.” Continue reading

A mele composed by Mary Jane Montano for the fourth anniversary of the Outdoor Circle, 1916.

HONOLULU, OUR FAIRY LAND

A feature of yesterday’s birthday luncheon of the Outdoor Circle was the reading of a Hawaiian poem, written by Mrs. Mary Jane Kulani F. Montana [Montano], author of the verses of “The Old Plantation,” and dedicated to the Circle. The original verses and an English translation were read by Mrs. Webb. These were:

HONOLULU AINA KUPUA.

I.

I ka puu wau o Manoa,
I ka wai ola a Kanaloa,
E kilohi i ka nani punono
O Honolulu Aina Kupua.
Ua nani mai ka uka a ke kai
He mele aloha i ana ka puuwai,
Me he ala e i mai ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua.

II.

Ua kini a lau na pua,
Kumoana la i kanahele,
Kanahele ohai pua ala,
I kanu ia e na lima aulii.
Aloha i ke oho o ka niu,
I ka holu nape i ke ehu kai,
Me he ala e i aku ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua. Continue reading

Liliu’s National Anthem reaches New York, after a fashion, 1875.

Their National Hymn.

The words and music of the Hawaiian national anthem are both the composition of Mrs. Lila K. Dominis, the sister of King Kalakaua. The first part of the hymn we transcribe for the edification of our readers:

HE MELE LAHIU HAWAII.

Ka Makua Mana Loa,
Malin wai ia wakou,
E haliu aku rei.
We wa hian haahan,
E wan ka waluhia
O rei Pae Alna,
Wal Hawaiia Nuhan,
Mololo o Kou Malu. Continue reading