More on Kamakau’s history, 1868.

History of Kamehameha.—A communication from Mr. Kamakau, the author of the History of Kamehameha, now in the course of publication in the Kuokoa, will be found in our columns. Continue reading

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“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

Plagiarism? 1868.

The History of S. M. Kamakau.

Aloha no.—These past Saturdays I saw within Whitney’s newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] them calling the haole government paper [Hawaiian Gazette], a thief, because of the translation of the History of S. M. Kamakau, into the English language, and for inserting it within some past issues of that newspaper. In my opinion, those pebbles pelted in contempt are not right at all. Continue reading

History of volcanic activities and why the newspapers need to be rescanned as clearly as possible, 1868–for the present, for the future.

[Found under: “Ke Ahi Pele Nui ma Hawaii. NA OLAI KUPINAI. KE KAI HOEE NUI! MAKE WELIWELI MA KAU! Na Palapala a na Makamaka mai Hawaii mai, eia iho malalo:”]

On Thursday at 3 in the afternoon, that being the 2nd of this April, there came a great powerful earthquake, and people could not stand upright, and so too the animals. The soil of the earth spew up into the sky like smoke and hills tumbled down; large trees fell, and some of the valleys were filled, and houses fell; the number of houses which fell numbered 30 or more; and 3 churches fell, the churches of Kahuku and Waiohinu and Punaluu; and there is a large pit at Kahuku that is 80 feet in circumference and 350 feet or more deep, and from within this pit rose steam like the steam of the volcanic crater; the distance from the port of Kaalualu to this pit is 6 miles or so; and there are many other deeds carried out by God. Continue reading

Hilo women protest, 1898.

WOMEN BOLT.

Hilo’s Patriotic League Repudiates the Central Society.

A committee of the Women’s Patriotic League of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, has made a protest against the memorial presented some time ago by  the Honolulu committee of that organization to the Commission. An English translation of the protest is as follows: Continue reading

Lines of familiar mele used in stories to elicit emotion, 1895.

[Found in: “HE MOOLELO NO Frank Reade Opio”]

Ike aku i ka ono o ka wai o ia pua,
Upu ae ka manao e kii aku e ako.

[I know of the sweet nectar of that flower,
The desire wells up to go and pluck it.]

[The use of lines of well-known mele like from Thomas Linsey’s “Honesakala” above is a feature of Hawaiian storytelling. They elicit a feeling or mood to help the flow of the moolelo. This particular translation of  one of the Frank Reade Jr. stories ran in Hawaiian in the Kuokoa from 5/25/1895 to 11/9/1895 under the title “He Moolelo no Frank Reade Opio: Ka Mea Nana i Hana ka Moku Lele ma ka Lewa-lani…”]

(Kuokoa, 8/17/1895, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIV, Helu 33, Aoao 1. Augate 17, 1895.