Hilo women protest, 1898.

WOMEN BOLT.

Hilo’s Patriotic League Repudiates the Central Society.

A committee of the Women’s Patriotic League of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, has made a protest against the memorial presented some time ago by  the Honolulu committee of that organization to the Commission. An English translation of the protest is as follows: Continue reading

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Lines of familiar mele used in stories to elicit emotion, 1895.

[Found in: “HE MOOLELO NO Frank Reade Opio”]

Ike aku i ka ono o ka wai o ia pua,
Upu ae ka manao e kii aku e ako.

[I know of the sweet nectar of that flower,
The desire wells up to go and pluck it.]

[The use of lines of well-known mele like from Thomas Linsey’s “Honesakala” above is a feature of Hawaiian storytelling. They elicit a feeling or mood to help the flow of the moolelo. This particular translation of  one of the Frank Reade Jr. stories ran in Hawaiian in the Kuokoa from 5/25/1895 to 11/9/1895 under the title “He Moolelo no Frank Reade Opio: Ka Mea Nana i Hana ka Moku Lele ma ka Lewa-lani…”]

(Kuokoa, 8/17/1895, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIV, Helu 33, Aoao 1. Augate 17, 1895.

Hawaiian translation of A. F. Grant’s “Loyal Ned on the last cruise of the Alabama,” 1888.

NED NIXON

the

Steel-Hearted and the Unforgettable Executor of Orders;

and the

The Final Siege

of the

“ALABAMA,”

the

Fierce Fighter and Fire Breather of the Atlantic Ocean.

“There are two wondrous ones of the sea,
Feared by the Whalers;
The Alabama and the Shenandoah,
Chasing in the distance.” Continue reading

A mele composed by Mary Jane Montano for the fourth anniversary of the Outdoor Circle, 1916.

HONOLULU, OUR FAIRY LAND

A feature of yesterday’s birthday luncheon of the Outdoor Circle was the reading of a Hawaiian poem, written by Mrs. Mary Jane Kulani F. Montana [Montano], author of the verses of “The Old Plantation,” and dedicated to the Circle. The original verses and an English translation were read by Mrs. Webb. These were:

HONOLULU AINA KUPUA.

I.

I ka puu wau o Manoa,
I ka wai ola a Kanaloa,
E kilohi i ka nani punono
O Honolulu Aina Kupua.
Ua nani mai ka uka a ke kai
He mele aloha i ana ka puuwai,
Me he ala e i mai ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua.

II.

Ua kini a lau na pua,
Kumoana la i kanahele,
Kanahele ohai pua ala,
I kanu ia e na lima aulii.
Aloha i ke oho o ka niu,
I ka holu nape i ke ehu kai,
Me he ala e i aku ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua. Continue reading

Liliu’s National Anthem reaches New York, after a fashion, 1875.

Their National Hymn.

The words and music of the Hawaiian national anthem are both the composition of Mrs. Lila K. Dominis, the sister of King Kalakaua. The first part of the hymn we transcribe for the edification of our readers:

HE MELE LAHIU HAWAII.

Ka Makua Mana Loa,
Malin wai ia wakou,
E haliu aku rei.
We wa hian haahan,
E wan ka waluhia
O rei Pae Alna,
Wal Hawaiia Nuhan,
Mololo o Kou Malu. Continue reading

Lorrin Andrews’ Hawaiian language dictionary, 1862.

Kumu Olelo Hawaii.

We are thrilled to hear that the Hawaiian Language Manual being assembled by the esteemed L. Andrews [ka mea Mahaloia L. Aneru]. It is a Book that explains the essence of words, like the haole; only the letter P remains, and then it is finished. There was a great resolution by the Legislature to set aside funds for this endeavor; but not a penny has been given by the Government Treasury. It can be made ready for printing should there be a skilled Hawaiian, and if there is not, it will take about three months before it can be printed. And now, there are many haole who want to know the Hawaiian language; and so too of the Hawaiians, they want to know English; therefore, we believe that it is appropriate that the money is spent on this. Continue reading