Edwin M. Desha fights for Ka Hoku o Hawaii, 1938.

Eddie Desha is Trying All Means to Save “Ka Hoku o Hawaii”

An effort to perpetuate the Hawaiian language and a Newspaper published in that language is being made in Hilo.

Eddie Desha, the nephew of the late Senator Stephen L. Desha Sr., is making this determined effort, with the courage and persistence which characterized his uncle, one of Hawaii’s noted orators and legislators.

Besides a small monthly magazine published by the Hawaiian Board of Missions [Ka Hoaloha], there now remains only one weekly newspaper printed in the native Hawaiian language of Hawaii. It is Ka Hoku o Hawaii (Star of Hawaii), published in Hilo by the Star of Hawaii Publishing Co., Ltd., of which W. H. Beers, Hilo attorney, is president, and Edwin M. Desha is treasurer and manager. Continue reading

On William Shakespeare, 1867.

[Found under: “NUHOU KULOKO: Honolulu.”]

Praise for Uilama Hoonaueueihe.—We saw in the English Government paper praise of the translation of the stories from English to Hawaiian of the man whose name is above. It is our desire to have our readers enjoy fine and proper moolelo. Continue reading

Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe licensed to practice in the Supreme Court, 1884.

[Found under: “LOCAL & GENERAL.”]

As stated by us last week, Mr. Joseph M. Poepoe has been admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of this Kingdom, having passed a most satisfactory examination before the full Bench. Mr. Poepoe has been for some time past a practitioner in the lower courts of the Kingdom and has also been engaged as principal assistant to Mr. John Russell, for the last two years and over, who speaks highly of his application and zeal in the performance of his professional duties. Continue reading

Translation of Kauikeaouli’s speech by Kauka Judd, 1843.

[Found under: “More British Aggression—Seizure of the Sandwich Islands.”]

All demands for proof of damages were regarded as “vexatious and inapplicable,” and the King was compelled to make a conditional cession of the islands to British Government, which he did by proclamation, as follows:

Where are you, Chiefs, People and Commons from my ancestor and people from foreign lands! Continue reading

Hawaiian language compass, 1905.

The First Compass in the Hawaiian Language.

“Missionaries arrived here before, here to the Hawaiian archipelago, and brought the gospel and the Christian way to guide the people to be good spiritually. But Hawaiians were not given a compass in their own mother tongue to use as a guide to steer their canoes,” according to J. R. Macaulay, the pilot who is well known in Honolulu Harbor.

And because Hawaiians lacked this, Mr. Macaulay created a compass that was marked with the Hawaiian terms for the directions as shown in the picture printed here.

According to this gentleman’s recollection, his is the first compass fashioned in the language of the land. This compass was designed with the help of Mr. J. K. Keliikahi, one of the boat pilots. And after careful adjustments, the desired results were reached, as is shown in the illustration.

For North, it is shown by its abbreviation, “A” [for akau], “He” [hema] for South, “Hi” [hikina] for East, and “K” [komohana] for West. There are 32 directional points set skillfully. And those in between the cardinal points are laid out and are written as shown below:

“A me Hi” for North and East, “A me K” for North and West, “AAK” for North North West, and “AK me K” for North West and West, and “A me Hi” for North and East, and “A Hi me A” for North East and North and so forth all the way around the compass.

The black divisions are made carefully so that the compass is accurate, and within the circle in the middle of the body, you cannot fail to see the names of Capt. J. R. Macaulay and J. K. Keliikahi, the two who fashioned this first compass in the mother tongue of this land. This is one of the valuable things in the history of Hawaii’s progress.

(Kuokoa, 11/17/1905, p. 1)

Kuokoa_11_17_1905_1

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 46, Aoao 1. Novemaba 17, 1905.

 

Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation reaches Hawaii nei, 1863.

[Found under: “KA NU HOU HOPE LOA.”]

—The President of the United States has pronounced his proclamation that the “nika” who are being enslaved in the states of the United States that rebelled will be freed, but notwithstanding the states that did not rebel; they shall give wages to their “nika,” and these are the words of the proclamation of the President:

“A no ia mea, owau o Aberahama Linekona, ka Peresidena o Amerika Huipuia, ma ka mana i haawiia mai ia’u ma ko’u ano Alihikaua o na puali koa a me na aumoku kaua, i ka wa e kipiia mai nei o Amerika Huipuia, a ma ke ano kaua hoi, i mea e hoopau ai ia kipi ana, ke hoike nei ma keia la mua o Ianuari, M. H. 1836, a e like hoi me ka’u i manao ai e pai ia ka’u olelo kuahaua mahope o kka hala ana o na la hookahi haneri, mai ka la i kakau ia’i ka olelo i haiia maluna, ke kuikahi nei i na mokuuaina a me na apana, kahi nona ka poe kanaka e noho kipi ana ia Amerika Huipuia i keia la, eia mahope nei, penei: Continue reading

On huli and planting and the ebook coming out from Bishop Museum Press, 1857/2020.

[Found under: “NO KA MAHIAI.”]

Not all kinds of huli are suitable for planting in wet patches. If the corm has been too closely cut off from the bottom of the huli and the huli itself is too small, it is not good for planting. If the taro has rotted and only a third remains good, Continue reading

Kiliwehi asks for divorce from William Hoapili Kaauwai, 1872.

NA OLELO HOOLAHA.

BEFORE THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE Second Judicial Circuit of the Hawaiian Islands. Maui, S. S. Adjoined June Term A. D. 1872. Thursday the twelfth day  of September, A. D. 1872. MARY ANN KILIWEHI KAAUWAI, Libellant for Divorce, vs. WILLIAM HOAPILI KAAUWAI. Continue reading