Kaahumanu Society on Kauai, 1918.

COMMEMORATION OF THE FIRST YEAR OF THE KAAHUMANU SOCIETY ON KAUAI OF MANOKALANIPO.

At the Hawaiian Church of Lihue, on Saturday, December 8, at 10 a.m., the one year meeting of the Society of the Kaahumanu Mothers, with the opening with the 2nd hymn of Leo Hoonani [“All the Way my Savior Leads me”], and the prayer from the mother, Mrs. Kaoo Kolohaiole, the preacher of the Society, (the prayer of the preacher was so very filled with reverence).

The proceedings of the society began with the calling of the president, Mrs. Mileka Kahele, and the head secretary of the society, Mrs. Eliza K. C. Holt. Continue reading

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Kaahumanu Society gathering in Haleiwa, 1870.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

Kaahumanu Society.—The Society had a banquet on this past 30th of July, as was advertised in the Kuokoa, and there was just so much food. The Society paraded from the schoolhouse in Haleiwa to the church, and the event was opened with a prayer by J. N. Paikuli.—Himeni—Speech by S. N. Emerson, and after that was done—Himeni—The Chapter 1 of Honolulu stood, and after that—The Chapter 2 of Honolulu stood, and after that—Himeni—and after the ceremonies at the church was over—they paraded to the schoolhouse, and that was where they had their banquet. Those who took part were only those on the roster, and the families of the Society,—that concluded the function. The Ahahui convened again that night at 6:30, and 12 more members joined the Society, making the total members 30 or more.

[Although it has been said that the Kaahumanu Society disbanded at the death of Princess Victoria Kamamalu in 1866, there is this report of a meeting at Liliuokalani Church.]

(Kuokoa, 8/6/1870, p. 2)

Kuokoa_8_6_1870_2

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IX, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Augate 6, 1870.

150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

And speaking of Princess V. K. Kamamalu and the Kaahumanu Society, here is how it was first established in the same year, 1864, by the three alii wahine Kamamalu, Pauahi, and Liliuokalani.

nupepa

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.

CONSTITUTION.

Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day…

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A mele for the birthday of Princess Victoria Kamehamalu Hae o Ku, 1864.

[Found under: “La hanau o ke Kama Alii Wahine”]

La Hanau.

1  No ka la hanau ke aloha,
La hanau o ke Alii,
Ke Kama o Hawaii nei,
Ka makua o ka lehulehu,
I keia la mua o Novemaba,
Ke ike nei kakou.

2  Ke ku nei no kakou,
Ma ka lai o Maunaihi,
Hoonani i ka la hanau,
La hanau o ke ‘Lii,
I keia la hoolai no,
Ua ike ko ka lani. Continue reading

Death of Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai, 1928.

Mrs. Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai Passed on.

At 10 o’clock P. M. of the evening of Wednesday, death visited the home of Mrs. E. A. Nawahi at Homelani, and took the life breathe of her youngest sister Mrs. Mihana K. Ai, at nearly 66 years of age. She was born here in Hilo, on the 24th of April in the year 1862 from the loins of Kahaoleaua and Ai-i, her father, one of the first Chinese who arrived in Hilo nei, and he arrived along with Hapai, Akau, Keoni Ina [John Ena], Akina, Keoniko, and Aiko, and these Chinese were the first ones to start Sugar Plantations at Amauulu, Paukaa, Kaupokuea [Kaupakuea], and Kohala.

Their parents had five of them, the first born was Mrs. Aana Kekoa, then next was Mrs. E. A. Nawahi [Emma Aima Nawahi], and Mrs. Alai Akana, and Mrs. Aoe Like who died earlier, and Mrs. Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai their youngest. She married Simeona Kealoha of Honomu in her youth, and after some years of them living in the bond of matrimony, they were separated, and Mrs. Mihana remarried with Mr. Ai who is now living. She was a member of the Haili Church, and she remained in that church until the time when death released her. She was a fine member of the Kaahumanu Society [Hui Kaahumanu] here in Hilo, and she was a good member of the Hale o na Alii. Continue reading

Mrs. J. P. Kahanamoku passes on, 1936.

MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU SETS THIS LIFE ASIDE

SHE WAS A MOTHER GREATLY BELOVED BY ALL

Mrs. Julia Paoa Kahanamoku left this life at 69 years old, and she is the mother of Sheriff Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. At 9 o’clock or so in the morning of this past Thursday, June 4, she left this life behind, at her residence at 1847 Ala Moana Road, after going into a decline through weakness for a long time. Her husband preceded her in death many years ago, Captain Duke H. Kahanamoku.

She was born here on Oahu, and she spent most of her life in Waikiki. She descended from the lines of the I and Mahi of Hawaii, …

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 1)

WAIHO MAI O MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1936.

…from ancient times, and her birth father, Mr. Hoolae Paoa, was one of the people who oversaw many ahupuaa during the monarchy. She was a full Hawaiian by birth, as well as was her husband.

During her healthy days, she participated in many promotional activities in this land. During the years of the great world war [WWI], she put herself out doing all the work of the Red Cross [Ahahui Ke’a Ulaula] in Honolulu;* she was a member of the Kapiolani Maternity Association, Daugthers of Hawaii, and a member of the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu].

Mrs. Kahanamoku had six sons, boys who each went off to find his own fortune, boys who participated greatly in promotional activities as well as body-strengthening events in this land. She has two girls who are living, and one who passed some year ago; the ones living are Bernice and Kapiolani, and the third who died was Maria.

Her ashes were buried at the cemetery in Nuuanu.

This Newspaper joins in on the grieving with this family of children who are bereft of their parents, as well as the rest of the family; and we humbly beseech that the sad thoughts of this family of children and all of the ohana as well be lightened.

*It is no surprise that Duke himself was knitting warm clothes for the Red Cross!

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 4)

...au kahiko, a o kona luaui makuakane...

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 11, 1836.

150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.

CONSTITUTION.

Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day of August every year in Honolulu nei, at the location designated.

Clause V. The Association will supply Record Books [Buke Oihana] of the Association, as well as any other expenses for the President, Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause VI. The President will select Executive Committees for this Association, and they will prepare lists of names of those who want to present themselves before the Association.

Clause VII. Should a member of this Association die, then the President or if not the President, then a representative will order by Executive Committee to gather in mourning attire at the place of the deceased for the funeral over her body.

Clause VIII. The President of this Association is empowered to establish other Associations on the other islands of this Nation.

Clause IX. The Association shall resolve all problems and difficulties brought before it from other lands.

Clause X. The Treasurer may expend all funds at her disposal with the approval of the President.

Clause XI. Members of this Association shall pay a dollar and a half ($1.50) yearly, or installments of an eighth ($0.12.1-2) every month; it is not prohibited to give more.

Clause XII. Clauses of this Constitution may be changed after one year.

¹Pauahi is often referred to as A. Pauahi. [Would there be anyone who knows what that initial stands for?]

(Kuokoa, 8/20/1864, p. 4)

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 34, Aoao 4. Augate 20, 1864.