Early beginnings of Hawaiian scholar, 1935.

Varied Activities Of Kam Girls

By ISABELLA AIONA

The vegetable garden club at the Kamehameha School for Girls will soon start on advanced gardening work instead of caring for vegetables. Although they may take care of their vegetables outside of gardening time, they must give their attention to budding, slipping, and grafting during garden period. Continue reading

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Reminiscences of the Hui Kawaihau, 1916.

THE HUI KAWAIHAU

There were several unusually interesting papers read at the last meeting of the Kauai Historical Society. Among them was one by Judge Charles S. Dole on the above subject which was as follows:

In the years from 1877 to 1881 the Hui Kawaihau, an organization of certain prominent Hawaiians and their friends, was one of the leading communities of the eastern side of the island of Kauai.

They were a body of men—most of whom came from Honolulu, with their families, where many of them were high officers in the Government—who went to Kapaa under the patronage of King Kalakaua, whose reign had then lasted for several years, for the purpose of establishing an association of congenial and intelligent farmers on the fertile cane lands at Kapahi, above Kapaa, in the year 1877.

The Hui Kawaihau was originally a choral society, of fifteen members, with social rather than business aims, and was first organized by Prince Leleiohoku, the Heir Apparent to the throne, in the year 1876—just before King Kalakaua’s coronation day, which was February 12th of that year.

The name “Kawaihau” (meaning “ice-water”) was originally derived as the nick-name of a lady residing in Honolulu at that time, a white woman, who was a friend of the King, but who did not court some of his royal favors and in the matter of liquid refreshment would drink only pure ice-water, in preference to the fiery gin which was usually dispensed from His Majesty’s sideboard. This choice of the lady was not understood by certain members of the royal court, and in derision they gave her the title “Ka Wahine o Kawaihau” (“The Lady of the Icewater”), and she became commonly known by the shorter appellation of “Kawaihau.”

Prince Leleiohoku died,  however, in April of the following year, 1877, at Iolani Palace, and the choral society would doubtless have disbanded but that King Kalakaua decided that it might be a good opportunity to establish some of his royal retainers—upon whom the dissipating court life was beginning to pall, or rather, perhaps, was beginning to produce disastrous results—in the beautiful climate and fertile lands of the district above the village of Kapaa, on the eastern coast of Kauai.

Another reason for the royal strategem was said to be that, although many of the prospective farmers were intelligent and industrious men, there were quite a number of them who were courtiers and hangers-on at Kalakaua’s palace, whom the King was glad to establish on another island—distant from Honolulu and the charms and temptations of court life.

So the Hui was reorganized, in the month of June, 1877, and among the twelve members who were its charter members are the well known names of King Kalakaua, Governor Dominis, the King’s brother-in-law; Colonel George W. Macfarlane, one of the leaders in the court circles of that day; Captain James Makee, who had often entertained the members of the Royal family at his beautiful residence at Ulupalakua, on the island of Maui; Governor John M. Kapena, of the island of Oahu; J. S. Walker and C. H. Judd, two men prominent in the court and government communities of Honolulu; and Koakanu, a high chief of Koloa, on Kauai.

These twelve organizers were the ones who set in motion the wheels of business of the Hui o Kawaihau, in the year 1877, their first important official act being to sign a contract with the resident members of the Hui, thirty-two in number, for the cultivation of the lands of Kapaa, on Kauai, to sugar cane.

Of the thirty-two original resident members of the Hui there are but seven living, so far as is known, these being: Judge James H. K. Kaiwi, of Lihue, who is with us tonight, a member of this Society, and is the sole member of the Hui Kawaihau left on the island of Kauai; Edward K. Lilikalani, of Honolulu; Frank K. Archer (also known as Kelinohopono), of Pearl City, Oahu; Ekela Mahuka, of Honolulu; John Wallace, of Honolulu; James Hauola Makekau, of Lahaina, Maui; and the Reverend Isaac Iaea, of Kaluaaha, on the island of Molokai. Besides these there are four widows of the original members of the Hui, viz.: Mrs. Pipili Pakaua Polani, of Waipouli; Mrs. Kaupena Uka, of Hanalei; Mrs. Hana Kaiwi, of Honolulu;…

(Garden Island, 11/28/1916, p. 2) Continue reading

W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

The latest from Hilo, 1898.

THE NEWS FROM NORTH HILO.

Mr. Editor of the Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian People:

Aloha oe:—Please include this bit of news from here in North Hilo.

On the first of this month, Pakele, Iaukea, Laika, Kalei, and Lahapa went to go pick opihi on the shore of Waipunalei, and upon their return, they climbed up the pali. Lahapa was the first to climb up and the rest followed. When they reached the midpoint up the pali, a rocked dislodged and hit Lapaha square on the chest and he rolled down the pali, and because of the love of God, he was caught on a pandanus tree that was burned earlier in a fire. It was 40 feet high from where he tumbled from to where he was caught. Therefore, O my sisters and brothers and younger siblings, don’t go pick opihi again and return upland of the pali, lest you end up dying. Continue reading

G. W. E. Kupele responds to Kanepuu’s question on the Kanepuaa plant, 1857.

Pertaining to the Kanepuaa Plant

O Hae Hawaii

Aloha oe:—I saw in the Hae Hawaii, Issue 19, the thought of J. H. Kanepuu. Asking the oldsters who know of the plant of Kanepuaa. The thing that will increase food and fish according to him, if the plant of Kanepuaa is gotten.

Here below is the response. The other day, I asked some oldsters with knowledge of the plant of Kanepuaa. They answered, it is not an actual plant like the plants of the medical kahuna [kahuna lapaau]. But it is a kind of worship by the name of Kanepuaa. Continue reading

J. H. Kanepuu seeks the amazing plant of Kanepuaa, 1857.

Something to quicken the development of sweet potato, and taro, and fish.

Aloha oe:—I have heard from some of our oldsters who are living. Perhaps there are many of them living in this archipelago who may have seen the plant of Kanepuaa? If the plant is used when planting sweet potato [uala]. It will fruit quickly, and the tubers will be large. If the mounds are all pulled up, and replanted along with the Kanepuaa plant, it will quickly mature once more; maybe in two or three weeks. Continue reading