On ohelo papa, 1856.

Ohelo papa: Some baskets of Ohelo papa were obtained by Armstrong [Limaikaika] from Makawao; L. L. Torburt [Torbert] sent them over; and they were marvelous. Some ohelo papa was sent earlier to the yearly exhibition of the Agricultural Society [Ahahui Mahiai], and the haole purchased them. This is something greatly desired by the haole; they buy ohelo papa in great amounts if it arrives. This is the problem, that it takes long, and most of it ripens at sea. But it doesn’t get too over ripe.

(Hae Hawaii, 8/13/1856, p. 96)

haehawaii_8_13_1856_96

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 24, Aoao 96. Augate 13, 1856.

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Lai Toodle? 1878.

From Kawaiulailiahi.—In a letter from S. D. W. Kawaiulailiahi of Kanahena we saw that a Chinese laborer of the Captain Makee & Co. was beaten by a supervisor [luna hana], and when he decided to go to bring charges before the Judge of the Honuaula district, he was found by the boss [haku hana], and was beaten again. He will also complain about how the luna of that sugar plantation make them work.

(Kuokoa, 10/26/1878, p. 2)

Kuokoa_10_26_1878_2.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 26, 1878.

Death of Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai, 1928.

Mrs. Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai Passed on.

At 10 o’clock P. M. of the evening of Wednesday, death visited the home of Mrs. E. A. Nawahi at Homelani, and took the life breathe of her youngest sister Mrs. Mihana K. Ai, at nearly 66 years of age. She was born here in Hilo, on the 24th of April in the year 1862 from the loins of Kahaoleaua and Ai-i, her father, one of the first Chinese who arrived in Hilo nei, and he arrived along with Hapai, Akau, Keoni Ina [John Ena], Akina, Keoniko, and Aiko, and these Chinese were the first ones to start Sugar Plantations at Amauulu, Paukaa, Kaupokuea [Kaupakuea], and Kohala.

Their parents had five of them, the first born was Mrs. Aana Kekoa, then next was Mrs. E. A. Nawahi [Emma Aima Nawahi], and Mrs. Alai Akana, and Mrs. Aoe Like who died earlier, and Mrs. Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai their youngest. She married Simeona Kealoha of Honomu in her youth, and after some years of them living in the bond of matrimony, they were separated, and Mrs. Mihana remarried with Mr. Ai who is now living. She was a member of the Haili Church, and she remained in that church until the time when death released her. She was a fine member of the Kaahumanu Society [Hui Kaahumanu] here in Hilo, and she was a good member of the Hale o na Alii. Continue reading

Death of K. Alapai of Honolii, 1915.

K. ALAPAI OF HONOLII HAS PASSED ON

This past week, death came and took away this old Kamaaina of Hilo, and his nature is well known to all the old timers of Hilo nei. He died at almost 95 years old. He was born at Pahoehoe near Paukaa, and moved and lived on the banks of the far side of Honolii; when there was no bridges on this stream, and when they first opened up the road, he took up the occupation of escorting people by Honolii Stream and escorting passengers by canoe, and after there were goats to transport people he at times helped pulling the passenger goats. When the many bridges of Honolii were built, he carried on his farming on the banks of that stream, and in his strong days, he sometimes worked in the sugar plantations while still living in the same place, and he was known by those who were familiar with him by the name “Alapai of Honolii” [Alapai o Honolii]. Continue reading

Mongoose, where it all began, 1883.

[Found under: “NEWS OF THE WEEK.”]

Mr. W. H. Purvis, proprietor of the Pacific Sugar Mill and Plantation at Kukuihaele, Hawaii, who arrived in this city per Zealandia, after having completed a tour around the world, brings seven mongooses from India and Africa, and will introduce them on his place on Hawaii. Mr. Purvis has had an opportunity of observing just what the mongoose will do in its native home, and says that it will not molest poultry or come about the premises where people live to disturb anything, but has a perfectly insatiable appetite for killing rats. These are the first mongooses ever brought to these Islands and in all probability they will increase rapidly and prove very useful in destroying all kinds of small vermin.

(PCA, 9/29/1883, p. 5)

Mr. W. H. Purvis...

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXVIII, Number 14, Page 5.

The latest from Kohala, 1879.

News of the Apaapaa Winds.

To My Constant Desire, Ka Nupepa Kuokoa.

Aloha oe:—On this past 11th of Oct., fire engulfed more or less 15 acres of Robert R. Hind’s.

This is the cause. The fire jumped from the property of J. W. Keohokii, Esq., while he and his workers were burning the leaves of the sugarcane.

And it was extinguished because of all of those assisting. The luckiest thing was that the cane was all ready to be milled.

While the smoke was billowing, the Fly Wheels of the two Mills spun, that being Haui Mill [Hawi Mill] and Union Mill,  hoping to quickly take care of that burning cane. Because of the terribly wild winds that day, it was not put out quickly.

On that very day of the fire, a Handwritten Newspaper at Kaiopihi under the editing of Joseph Poepoe was issued.

The name of that paper is “Hoku o ke Kai.” When we examined it, the discussions were outstanding.

On the past 16th of this month, at 6 o’clock in the evening, the sugar plantation people of the district of Kohala, from Niulii to Kaauhuhu, met at the Court House. And this is what happened at that meeting.

The officers were chosen first. J. Wight, President; Dr. Thompson, Vice President; H. B. Montgomery, Secretary; D. S. Kahookano, Hawaiian Secretary; Charles Hapkins [Charles Hopkins], Translator.

After this, Henry Johnson explained the purpose of this meeting.

1. Pertaining to the laborers. 2. Pertaining to the wages of the laborers. 3. The work hours per day. This was left to a committee.

D. R. Vida, Esq., asked that a Committee be selected to  form a constitution, laws, and rules; the motion was passed.

H. Johnson, Esq. put forth the name of this organization, that being “Hui imi pono a hooholomua o ka poe mahiko a Wili o Kohala” [Association seeking rights and progress for the workers of the plantations and Mills of Kohala].

The meeting was adjourned until the 30th of Oct. to hear the report of the Committee.

Yesterday afternoon, Oct. 17, a brick fell between the Boilers of the Mill of R. R. Hind, Esq., but there were no serious injuries.

Those were a few news items from here in the Back areas.

Charlse N. Pulaa.

Honomakua, Kohala, Oct. 18, 1879.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1879, p. 3)

Na Anoai o Ke Apaapaa.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVIII, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Okatoba 25, 1879.

Bags to ship sugar to be woven of lauhala or akaakai? 1873.

Wanted.

Here is something that is much sought after by the producers of sugar. Bags that are woven with strips [ko-ana] of bulrush [akaakai] or lauahala perhaps, to put brown sugar [ko-paa eleele] in and ship to Australia or America. The previous week, a schooner brought 15,000 bags of this type from New Zealand, and the haole traders greatly appreciated them. The length of the bags are 33 inches, and 17 inches wide. If bags like these are woven here at a reasonable price, and a thousand are made, they will be sold out in a year. Continue reading