W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

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The latest from Hilo, 1898.

THE NEWS FROM NORTH HILO.

Mr. Editor of the Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian People:

Aloha oe:—Please include this bit of news from here in North Hilo.

On the first of this month, Pakele, Iaukea, Laika, Kalei, and Lahapa went to go pick opihi on the shore of Waipunalei, and upon their return, they climbed up the pali. Lahapa was the first to climb up and the rest followed. When they reached the midpoint up the pali, a rocked dislodged and hit Lapaha square on the chest and he rolled down the pali, and because of the love of God, he was caught on a pandanus tree that was burned earlier in a fire. It was 40 feet high from where he tumbled from to where he was caught. Therefore, O my sisters and brothers and younger siblings, don’t go pick opihi again and return upland of the pali, lest you end up dying. Continue reading

G. W. E. Kupele responds to Kanepuu’s question on the Kanepuaa plant, 1857.

Pertaining to the Kanepuaa Plant

O Hae Hawaii

Aloha oe:—I saw in the Hae Hawaii, Issue 19, the thought of J. H. Kanepuu. Asking the oldsters who know of the plant of Kanepuaa. The thing that will increase food and fish according to him, if the plant of Kanepuaa is gotten.

Here below is the response. The other day, I asked some oldsters with knowledge of the plant of Kanepuaa. They answered, it is not an actual plant like the plants of the medical kahuna [kahuna lapaau]. But it is a kind of worship by the name of Kanepuaa. Continue reading

J. H. Kanepuu seeks the amazing plant of Kanepuaa, 1857.

Something to quicken the development of sweet potato, and taro, and fish.

Aloha oe:—I have heard from some of our oldsters who are living. Perhaps there are many of them living in this archipelago who may have seen the plant of Kanepuaa? If the plant is used when planting sweet potato [uala]. It will fruit quickly, and the tubers will be large. If the mounds are all pulled up, and replanted along with the Kanepuaa plant, it will quickly mature once more; maybe in two or three weeks. Continue reading

On ohelo papa, 1856.

Ohelo papa: Some baskets of Ohelo papa were obtained by Armstrong [Limaikaika] from Makawao; L. L. Torburt [Torbert] sent them over; and they were marvelous. Some ohelo papa was sent earlier to the yearly exhibition of the Agricultural Society [Ahahui Mahiai], and the haole purchased them. This is something greatly desired by the haole; they buy ohelo papa in great amounts if it arrives. This is the problem, that it takes long, and most of it ripens at sea. But it doesn’t get too over ripe.

(Hae Hawaii, 8/13/1856, p. 96)

haehawaii_8_13_1856_96

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 24, Aoao 96. Augate 13, 1856.

Lai Toodle? 1878.

From Kawaiulailiahi.—In a letter from S. D. W. Kawaiulailiahi of Kanahena we saw that a Chinese laborer of the Captain Makee & Co. was beaten by a supervisor [luna hana], and when he decided to go to bring charges before the Judge of the Honuaula district, he was found by the boss [haku hana], and was beaten again. He will also complain about how the luna of that sugar plantation make them work.

(Kuokoa, 10/26/1878, p. 2)

Kuokoa_10_26_1878_2.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 26, 1878.