Getting kalo grown in Waipio to the market, 1920.

[Found under: “KELA AME KEIA”]

The farmers in Waipio are putting in the effort to grow their huli, but the problem of these people who are patiently planting kalo Continue reading

Market prices in Honolulu, 1844.

HONOLULU MARKET.

COUNTRY PRODUCE.

Sugar—Muscavado—per lb. 3 to 4 cts.
Molasses—per gallon, 12 1-2 to 20 c.
Arrow-Root—per lb. 4 cts.
Coffee, per lb. 12 1-2 to 25 c.
Hides (green) each $3. do, dry, per lb. 8 cents.
Goat Skins, each, 18 cents.
Raw Silk, per lb. 3 to $5.
Leaf Tobacco, per lb. 6 cts.
Salt, cargo price per bbl. 75 c.
Lime, per bbl. $1.50.
Wood, per cord $10.
Castor Oil, per gallon $2.
Kukui do. do. 50 a 75 c.
Maize per bbl. $4.
Mustard Seed, per lb. 2 1-2 c. Continue reading

Sale of oopuhue outlawed, 1945.

Balloon Fish Placed ‘Out of Bounds’ By Board Of Health

THE BALLOON, OR OOPUHUE FISH

The sale of puffer or balloon fish (oopuhue) has been banned by the territorial Board of Health, because of recent outbreaks of balloon fish poisoning which caused hospitalization of several persons, Dr. Richard K. C. Lee, director of public health, announced yesterday. Continue reading

Shark fin, sea cucumber and tree ear trade, 1864.

Sea Cucumber [Loli];—Tree Ear [Pepeiaolaau]—and Shark Fin [Lala Mano.]—In today’s newspaper, there is printed an Advertisement by Akuwai, one of the Chinese merchants of Honolulu nei, calling for all people to bring in Loli, Pepeiaolaau, and Lala Mano, to their Shop on Nuuanu Street, makai sdie of the store of A. S. Cleghorn [Ake], and right in front of the Hawaiian hotel, that being Haleola. Therefore O Friends near the sea, you should all go and bring in Sea Cucumber, Tree Ear, and Shark Fin, so that you get rich off of the money of Akuwai and company. Be quick! Be quick, lest you be too late.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1864, p. 2)

Kuokoa_4_23_1864_2

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 17, Aoao 2. Aperila 23, 1864.

A Hawaiian Co-Op, 1918.

KA “HUI LOKAHI O NA HAWAII” KAUPALENAIA.

These passing day, Hawaiians like Mayor Joseph J. Fern, David Kalauokalani, Samuel C. Dwight, James L. Holt, Hon. William P. Jarrett, Hon. C. P. Iaukea and a number of other Hawaiians are joining together to establish a company that will deal in the sale of poi, beef, salmon, dried fish, and so forth; with the intent to help Hawaiians in all ways that will lessen their household expenses; because it is very clear these days that because the poi factory of Kalihi is not making poi now, the current poi manufacturers are greatly raising the price of poi to five cents per pound; this is a price not seen in the past ten years or more; so too with the price of beef; the Chinese are buying very fine beef from the company of C. J. Waller [Wala], but the Chinese are charging Hawaiians 35 cents per p0und; it is an exorbitant price which has never been seen before; and it is heard from the talk of the Chinese that they will raise the price of poi once again to 6 cents a pound; it was this that encouraged the Hawaiians to establish a company that could hold back the severe increasing of the prices of our foods, O Hawaiians, by the Chinese.

The establishing of a company amongst Hawaiians is important and crucial; but if we Hawaiians do not implement an endeavor that will help ourselves, there will  be no one else who will help us.

If we turn back and look at the history of Hawaii nei, we will see that the dissension amongst us Hawaiians was what wrenched away small businesses from us Hawaiians as well as all the other endeavors. Continue reading

Bumper crop of mangos, 1868.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

Mango Fruit.—The past days, and these days as well, a lot [makena wale] of this delicious fruit is seen often at the markets and on the street sides of this town, but other fruits are very rare. We have seen thirty or more or less being sold for an eighth of a dollar [hapawalu], but it was not so recently when there wasn’t any; at that time at the Chinese stores it was six or ten for an eighth of a dollar. Those who crave mango are saved these days, and the adults and children peel them as they walk about the streets; and much is the diarrhea.

(Kuokoa, 8/8/1868, p. 2)

Kuokoa_8_8_1868_2.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Augate 8, 1868.