Shark fin, sea cucumber and tree ear trade, 1864.

Sea Cucumber [Loli];—Tree Ear [Pepeiaolaau]—and Shark Fin [Lala Mano.]—In today’s newspaper, there is printed an Advertisement by Akuwai, one of the Chinese merchants of Honolulu nei, calling for all people to bring in Loli, Pepeiaolaau, and Lala Mano, to their Shop on Nuuanu Street, makai sdie of the store of A. S. Cleghorn [Ake], and right in front of the Hawaiian hotel, that being Haleola. Therefore O Friends near the sea, you should all go and bring in Sea Cucumber, Tree Ear, and Shark Fin, so that you get rich off of the money of Akuwai and company. Be quick! Be quick, lest you be too late.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1864, p. 2)

Kuokoa_4_23_1864_2

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 17, Aoao 2. Aperila 23, 1864.

Advertisements

Tobacco grown in Hawaii, 1863.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Chewing Tobacco.—Hawaiian tobacco leaves are have begun to be made into chewing tobacco and smoking tobacco as well, just like foreign tobacco. Mr. J. Dudoit is the one undertaking this. We have but heard from those who smoke tobacco and chew tobacco that it is excellent. It is available for purchase at the store of A. S. Cleghorn [Ake].

(Kuokoa, 8/22/1863, p. 2.)

Pakanau Hawaii.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke II, Helu 34, Aoao 2. Augate 22, 1863.

More on that wedding celebration up in Pauoa. 1898.

WEDDING PARTY IN PAUOA.

Yesterday afternoon, May 26, that grand luau was indeed held that was mentioned earlier, to honor the wedded couples in the uplands of Pauoa. There were many important people of Honolulu that were invited; attending was Princess Kaiulani and her father, Princes Kawananakoa and Kalanianaole and his wife, Judge Waikina [Whiting], and many more.

This was one of the beautiful wedding celebrations seen; there were many people who came, along with the abundant foods prepared for the guests who gave their congratulations to the wedded couples who were being honored that day. There too was the Kawaihau Glee Club who entertained the crowd. Everyone ate their fill, and drank till satiated of the waters of Kanaulu. We pray that the days following the youths be full of blessings.

[This is the wedding celebration mentioned earlier.

Also, does anyone know what the “wai a Kanaulu” is a reference to? It seems that it is a phrase that is used widely… ]

(Aloha Aina, 6/4/1898, p. 7)

KA AHAAINA MARE MA PAUOA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 23, Aoao 7. Iune 4, 1898.