Revival of the Kawaihau Glee Club, 1904.

The Kawaihau Glee Club Reawakened.

It is a happy thing that we received news that Kawaihau Glee Club was revived, one of the clubs that made Hawaii popular for singing, and it is one of the old groups of Hawaii nei that was established to entertain at celebrations and concerts. Continue reading

Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.

KAWAIHAU GIVES A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE BAND

KA HUI HIMENI ALII KAWAIHAU

Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

Hawaiian Music, an editorial, 1911.

How Hawaiian Music is Being Misconstrued!

Perhaps the thoughts of the Kuokoa may not be the same as those of others about the way Hawaiian music is being sung these days, but because we hold dear listening to the beauty and the sweet sounds along with the joy of the voices, therefore the Kuokoa takes up this matter.

It is not something that we Hawaiians should criticize, that singing is something we are proud of, and something that makes this race famous all around the world, by tourists who visit Hawaii nei and hear us singing our enjoyable and entertaining songs, as well as by singing groups being seen travelling about America.

If we were to turn back in time, to many years past, when the Kawaihau Glee Club and many other groups were famous for singing, we will see when comparing them to those performing today, the differences between them; our admiration will be taken by the singing of the old days, which many groups in some places around Hawaii nei still practice that way of singing Hawaiian songs.

Our Hawaiian mele are composed with their many kaona, and it is by how they are sung, if it is not made clear by the lyrics, that give appreciation and admiration to the listener, from Hawaiians to those that don’t know our language, because it is only through the melody of the song that that listener is entertained.

These days however, our singers are following haole style singing; and when songs that we are used to hearing along with their tunes which fill us with energy and enthrallment are changed, when listening to that it is like ridicule, for we are not used to hearing that kind of melody, and Hawaiian songs are not famous for that style of singing.

Our people, from the men to the women are talented with fine singing voices; it is a talent not widely spread amongst other people of the world, but it is not by the the way some people now are singing, but by singing songs as they were sung in years past.

Perhaps the vibrato and the slow and drawn out of singing matches haole songs of this age, but by changing the way Hawaiian songs are sung in this way, we at the Kuokoa are not mistaken when we say that it is insulting to the listener.

We don’t wish to call this person or that one not a good singers, but should we want our goal to be to preserve this fame through song, there is only one arena for us to stand before the other races, that is through expressing what God has given to every Hawaiian man and woman, without mimicking or emulating what other people are doing; lest what is seen by us as good becomes something that is not good.

We have nothing to say to those who are studying music in books; that will be a great benefit to some, but the good seen in one aspect will not get better by changing another aspect; so it is with our Hawaiian music, by changing how they are sung, it will not make them better.

Each and every Hawaiian is the true witness, and they are the perfect judge to weigh what we now discuss, not to criticize or to assail upon someone with words of persecution, but for our affection of the grandeur and true beauty of Hawaiian mele which each and every one of us all love and cherish.

[On a somewhat related topic about tradition and kuleana and mele, there is a very thought-provoking essay for composers and non-composers alike, by Kainani Kahaunaele, printed in The Value of Hawaii 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions, just recently out. In fact, if you haven’t got your copy yet, there are many stories by a wide range of writers in there that we should look at, and perhaps the many moolelo within the collection will then push us into thinking what we ourselves feel the value of Hawaii nei is and where we should be headed and what it is we need to do to get us there.]

(Kuokoa, 9/8/1911, p. 4)

PEHEA E HOOHEPAIA MAI NEI NA HIMENI HAWAII!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

Kawaihau Glee Club performs in Washington State. 1905.

The Kawaihau Glee Club in Spokane, America.

Here below is a letter received as well as a program from some performances given by the Kawaihau Glee Club at Spokane, Washington (not Washington in the East, but Washington State to the North of California). It is apparent from the letter that the actions of that haole taking these Hawaiian boys around is much appreciated, and this is seen as below:

Spokane, Wash., October 7, 1905.

S. K. Nawaa, Aloha to you:

We’ve arrived in this beautiful town, we left Frisco on Saturday the 7th [?] at 11 a. m. and got to Seattle in the morning, at 7:30 a. m. boarded the 8 o’clock train for Spokane. Our contract is for 3 months. If they are taken by the sound of Hawaiian music, we will stay on for another 6 months, which would make 9 months total. Perhaps we will be like old grandparents by then.
I have sent a newspaper to you. But here is the thing, I had problems with the postage, so you will have to take care of it.
We really are thankful for our Boss here, W. L. Greenburn [?], he is an investigator. The one problem is that he treats us as if he is our father. Everything is first class, from the train, to the boat, to the hotel, and so forth. My friends, James Shaw, John Edward [Edwards?], D. Nape [David Nape], C. P. Kaleikoa, James Kulolia, James Kamakani, Kalani Peters, H. Kaeo and me, your friend as well, we are all in good health. As soon as I get acclimated to how it is here, I will write again.
Much Aloha,
Mekia Kealakai.

SILVER GRILL
MUSIC PROGRAM
Opening Enkakement of King Kalakau’s Kawaihau Orchestra.
EVENING PROGRAM, 9 to 12

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1905.

1 March “Hiki Mai” Arr by Berger
2 Song “Lei ohaha” Kealakai
3 Song “Ua hiki no me au” Kulolia
4 Song “Awaiaulu” Lala
5 Waltz “Aloha kuu home” Mahuia
6 Song “Eleile” Queen Lil
7 Song “Ooe no kai ike” Huelani
8 March “Maui” arr by Berger
9 Bass Solo “Wiliwili wai” Kamakani
10 Song (a dance) Hawaiian Maid” Kaeo
11 Waltz “Kawaiahau” Mekia
12 Song “Lei Lehua” King Kalakaua
13 Song “Malanai” Queen Lil
14 “Karama” Grey

THIS EVENING’S PROGRAM.

1 March “Lake” Nape
2 Song “Kawaihau” Mekia
3 Song “Maemae Lihau” Makini
4 Ballad “Like no a like” Alice
5 Song “Old Plantation” Nape
6 Song “E lei no au” Kapoli
7 Waltz “Kawaihau” Kealakai
8 Hula (a dance) “Komikomi” Eluene
9 March “Moana” Kaleikoa
10 Song “Pili aoao” Kulolia
11 Song “Lulu wai aloha” Kalani
12 Hula (a dance) Moanalua Kaeo
13 Ballad “Kaiulani” Eluene
14 Song “Ninipo” Pali
15 Song “Puni Kauoha” Mekia
16 Song “1, 2, 3, 4.” Kimo
17 Farewell Song “Aloha oe” Queen Li
18 Hawaiian National Anthem “Hawaii Ponoi King Kalakaua

[I am assuming that they copied the program as it was printed out in Washington…]

(Kuokoa, 11/3/1905, p. 5)

Ka Hui Himeni Kawaihau ma Spokane, Amerika.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 44, Aoao 5. Novemaba 3, 1905.

Kawaihau Glee Club off to San Francisco. 1905.

The Famous Singing Group “Kawaihau”

They Left for Afar.

“E nihi ka helena mai hoopa; [Tread carefully, don’t touch;]
Mai pulale i ka ike a ka maka [Don’t get excited by what the eye sees:]
Hookahi no makamaka o ke ALOHA [There is but one companion, that is ALOHA];
A hea mai ia Kawaihau e kipa. [Calling out to Kawaihau to come visit.]”¹

Aboard the deck of the steamship Alameda that moved swiftly on to the Golden Gate of California on the morning of Wednesday was seen the members of the famed singing group “Kawaihau” standing like officers of the ship while garlands of fragrant flowers of the beloved land hung about their necks; they wore the lei like a beloved sweetheart ever imbuing fragrance in their bosom. They were seen inhaling for the last time the adornment familiar to them as they were leaving for the great sea headed for foreign lands; and they were seeing for the last time the verdure of the land which disappeared from their eyes for who knows how long.

Not just them, but also there were the companions to curl up together in the cold nights—their wives, there to kiss their cheeks for the last time, which they sealed threefold with love, as

“O ka hao a ka ua i na pali [The assault of the rain in the cliffs]
Pale oe, pale au, pale kaua.” Aloha no! [I fend off, you fend off, we both fend off.”² Aloha!]

Just as reported earlier in the Kuokoa of last week, so did this group carry out, and today they are travelling over the ocean to fulfill the contract made with them.

This past Monday that dance advertised earlier in the Kuokoa was held, and the venue where the event took place was filled with the multitudes of Honolulu; perhaps they knew that this gathering would be the last they’d hear the singing of the performers of this group, and that is probably why Honolulu’s people thronged there and gave their aloha to the boys of the band.

In the picture above, you can see the boys who went, although some of them are currently with the Hawaiian Band in San Francisco and will meet up with their companions who left.

¹Play on the chorus of Kalakaua’s “E Nihi ka Hele.”
²Anyone know what mele this might come from?

[This is who played at that huge wedding celebration in Pauoa attended by Kaiulani in 1898 (the articles posted yesterday)]

(Nupepa Kuokoa, 9/22/1905, p. 1)

Ua Hala i'o Aku la Lakou

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 38, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 22, 1905.

More on that wedding celebration up in Pauoa. 1898.

WEDDING PARTY IN PAUOA.

Yesterday afternoon, May 26, that grand luau was indeed held that was mentioned earlier, to honor the wedded couples in the uplands of Pauoa. There were many important people of Honolulu that were invited; attending was Princess Kaiulani and her father, Princes Kawananakoa and Kalanianaole and his wife, Judge Waikina [Whiting], and many more.

This was one of the beautiful wedding celebrations seen; there were many people who came, along with the abundant foods prepared for the guests who gave their congratulations to the wedded couples who were being honored that day. There too was the Kawaihau Glee Club who entertained the crowd. Everyone ate their fill, and drank till satiated of the waters of Kanaulu. We pray that the days following the youths be full of blessings.

[This is the wedding celebration mentioned earlier.

Also, does anyone know what the “wai a Kanaulu” is a reference to? It seems that it is a phrase that is used widely… ]

(Aloha Aina, 6/4/1898, p. 7)

KA AHAAINA MARE MA PAUOA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 23, Aoao 7. Iune 4, 1898.