Hawaiian Band and the parade for the Knights Templar, 1883.

THE SIR KNIGHTS IN CALIFORNIA.

A Splendid Reception.

San Francisco, 18.—The arrival of the St. Bernard commandery, of Chicago was the event of the day. A delegation from the San Francisco Commandery proceeded as far as Truckee, to welcome them to the Pacific coast. The special honors tendered them are in recognition of the welcome the latter gave to the Pacific coast Knights at the Chicago conclave. On their arrival this morning they were met at the ferry landing by the Knights of the city commanderies, accompanied by Knights from Illinois now here; all in full dress uniform, after the exchange of greetings the knights fell into line, led by the Hawaiian band, and followed by the California commandery mounted. The Presidio band, Golden Gate commandery, St. Bernard band and St. Bernard commandery bringing up the rear. In this order they reached the Baldwin Hotel selected as the headquarters of the Chicago commandery. As an evidence of the marked attention paid them, one detail may be mentioned. Each cigar purchased for their use was provided with a band on which was painted, in colors, the name of their commandery while each box, specially made, was emblazoned with the device, St. Bernard. Mrs. Moulton, wife of the commander, was presented with a flower piece, three fee long and two in breadth, representing every variety of the choicest flowers of California. Including knights from Oregon and Washington Territory, it is estimated that 3,000 persons arrived in this city within the last twenty-four hours.

(Salt Lake Daily Herald, 8/19/1883, p. 1)

SaltLakeHerald_8_19_1883_1

Salt Lake Daily Herald, Volume XIV, Number 64, Page 1. August 19, 1883.

50th Anniversary of the Bana Hawaii, 1919

Pictures 1—The Hawaiian Band taken in San Francisco in 1883. 2—The band on the steps of the new Palace and the Executive Building [Hale Mana Hooko] today, taken in 1884. The new uniforms of the boys seen in this picture was sent by mistake from America to Honduras, Central America. 3—The Band lead by [Jose S.] Libornio that refused to swear under the Provisional Government in 1893. 4—The picture of J. K. Pohina [James K. Pohina], the only man left of the 26 who established the band 50 years ago, who is still with the Hawaiian Band. 5—The band at the Golden Gate, of San Francisco, at a banquet in 1895. 6—The band today at their new home on Waiakamilo Street, Kalihi. 7—The Bana Hawaii leading the parade of the Great Secret Society Knights Templars in San Francisco, August 20, 1883.

50 YEARS SINCE THE FORMATION OF THE BANA HAWAII

When Kamehameha V was ruling fifty years ago, the Hawaiian Band was established by a British man named Mr. Northcett, under orders of the King. On that day 26 young men were chosen for the band from the reformatory school of Keoneula, and the teaching of this knowledge to them was immediately began. The king had this idea first and so brass instruments were ordered earlier and they arrived here in Honolulu before he chose Mr. Northcett as the instructor to teach the boys. Continue reading

Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.

KAWAIHAU GIVES A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE BAND

KA HUI HIMENI ALII KAWAIHAU

Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

Kawaihau Glee Club off to San Francisco. 1905.

The Famous Singing Group “Kawaihau”

They Left for Afar.

“E nihi ka helena mai hoopa; [Tread carefully, don’t touch;]
Mai pulale i ka ike a ka maka [Don’t get excited by what the eye sees:]
Hookahi no makamaka o ke ALOHA [There is but one companion, that is ALOHA];
A hea mai ia Kawaihau e kipa. [Calling out to Kawaihau to come visit.]”¹

Aboard the deck of the steamship Alameda that moved swiftly on to the Golden Gate of California on the morning of Wednesday was seen the members of the famed singing group “Kawaihau” standing like officers of the ship while garlands of fragrant flowers of the beloved land hung about their necks; they wore the lei like a beloved sweetheart ever imbuing fragrance in their bosom. They were seen inhaling for the last time the adornment familiar to them as they were leaving for the great sea headed for foreign lands; and they were seeing for the last time the verdure of the land which disappeared from their eyes for who knows how long.

Not just them, but also there were the companions to curl up together in the cold nights—their wives, there to kiss their cheeks for the last time, which they sealed threefold with love, as

“O ka hao a ka ua i na pali [The assault of the rain in the cliffs]
Pale oe, pale au, pale kaua.” Aloha no! [I fend off, you fend off, we both fend off.”² Aloha!]

Just as reported earlier in the Kuokoa of last week, so did this group carry out, and today they are travelling over the ocean to fulfill the contract made with them.

This past Monday that dance advertised earlier in the Kuokoa was held, and the venue where the event took place was filled with the multitudes of Honolulu; perhaps they knew that this gathering would be the last they’d hear the singing of the performers of this group, and that is probably why Honolulu’s people thronged there and gave their aloha to the boys of the band.

In the picture above, you can see the boys who went, although some of them are currently with the Hawaiian Band in San Francisco and will meet up with their companions who left.

¹Play on the chorus of Kalakaua’s “E Nihi ka Hele.”
²Anyone know what mele this might come from?

[This is who played at that huge wedding celebration in Pauoa attended by Kaiulani in 1898 (the articles posted yesterday)]

(Nupepa Kuokoa, 9/22/1905, p. 1)

Ua Hala i'o Aku la Lakou

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 38, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 22, 1905.