Whale vs Shark, 1909.

WHALE BATTLES SHARK

Seeing a fight between a Shark and a Whale was something entranced the tourists of the Moana Hotel outside of Waikiki at ten o’clock or so in the morning of this past Wednesday.

Just as the tourists usually do when staying at that hotel, they often go out to the lanai to watch the steamships leaving Honolulu Harbor, and that is why they gathered on the lanai to watch the departure of the Steamship Alameda.

When the Alameda was nearing directly outside of the hotel, the jumping of a huge whale was seen, as it kept striking its tail upon the surface of the sea. Continue reading

Advertisements

More on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Expo, 1909.

THE HAWAIIAN GIRLS HEADED TO THE EXPOSITION IN SEATTLE

—Advertiser Photo.

Miss M. Mondon  Miss Pauline Evans  Miss Irene Boyd

Mrs. Charles Siemsen  Mrs. Will Cooper  Miss Wattie Holt

It was aboard the steamship Almeda which left on Wednesday that these girls of Honolulu, as shown above in the picture, to go to the exposition being held in Seattle.

They went to go  view the various displays of Hawaii nei sent there to show the world some things from Hawaii nei, the place called the Paradise of the Pacific.

Before their leaving of the beloved community of Hawaii nei, there was held an audience with them along with a party at the residence of Governor Frear on the afternoon of this Tuesday.

They left under the care of Mrs. Will Cooper, and being that Mrs. Knudsen is already at the exposition ground, she will be the kamaaina there who will welcome these girls when they get there.

[See how much clearer the digital image available on Chronicling America is of the same picture in the Pacific Commercial Advertiser from the front page of 5/26/1909. Hopefully someday soon we will be able to rescan all of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers to get the clearest images of not only the pictures, but of the text, so everything is clearly legible!]

(Kuokoa, 5/28/1909, p. 1)

NA KAIKAMAHINE HAWAII NO KA HOIKEIKE MA SEATTLE

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 22, Aoao 1. Mei 28, 1909.

Kawaihau Glee Club off to San Francisco. 1905.

The Famous Singing Group “Kawaihau”

They Left for Afar.

“E nihi ka helena mai hoopa; [Tread carefully, don’t touch;]
Mai pulale i ka ike a ka maka [Don’t get excited by what the eye sees:]
Hookahi no makamaka o ke ALOHA [There is but one companion, that is ALOHA];
A hea mai ia Kawaihau e kipa. [Calling out to Kawaihau to come visit.]”¹

Aboard the deck of the steamship Alameda that moved swiftly on to the Golden Gate of California on the morning of Wednesday was seen the members of the famed singing group “Kawaihau” standing like officers of the ship while garlands of fragrant flowers of the beloved land hung about their necks; they wore the lei like a beloved sweetheart ever imbuing fragrance in their bosom. They were seen inhaling for the last time the adornment familiar to them as they were leaving for the great sea headed for foreign lands; and they were seeing for the last time the verdure of the land which disappeared from their eyes for who knows how long.

Not just them, but also there were the companions to curl up together in the cold nights—their wives, there to kiss their cheeks for the last time, which they sealed threefold with love, as

“O ka hao a ka ua i na pali [The assault of the rain in the cliffs]
Pale oe, pale au, pale kaua.” Aloha no! [I fend off, you fend off, we both fend off.”² Aloha!]

Just as reported earlier in the Kuokoa of last week, so did this group carry out, and today they are travelling over the ocean to fulfill the contract made with them.

This past Monday that dance advertised earlier in the Kuokoa was held, and the venue where the event took place was filled with the multitudes of Honolulu; perhaps they knew that this gathering would be the last they’d hear the singing of the performers of this group, and that is probably why Honolulu’s people thronged there and gave their aloha to the boys of the band.

In the picture above, you can see the boys who went, although some of them are currently with the Hawaiian Band in San Francisco and will meet up with their companions who left.

¹Play on the chorus of Kalakaua’s “E Nihi ka Hele.”
²Anyone know what mele this might come from?

[This is who played at that huge wedding celebration in Pauoa attended by Kaiulani in 1898 (the articles posted yesterday)]

(Nupepa Kuokoa, 9/22/1905, p. 1)

Ua Hala i'o Aku la Lakou

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 38, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 22, 1905.