Pineapple at the expo in Seattle, 1909.

HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE IS HIGHLY DESIRED AT THE EXPOSITION.

There is much desire for hala kahiki from Hawaii at the exposition being held in Seattle, because on the ship that just left Honolulu for San Francisco, five-hundred boxes of pineapple is being sent to be sold at the show grounds.

One hundred pineapples are being sold on the average each day, but it is believed that not everyone visiting has tasted the pineapple from Hawaii; and if they receive those added boxes of pineapple, it will supply the visitors for a good amount of time.

This great taking to of the pineapples from Hawaii at Seattle has become something for the pineapple planters to rejoice about, because they feel that that is the one place where people from all over the world can see the quality and the affordability of the pineapples of Hawaii which is foremost above the pineapples of other places.

From now on, the pineapple planters will prepare for orders, and they are able to supply large amounts of pineapples that will be desired.

(Kuokoa, 6/25/1909, p. 5)

MAKEMAKE NUIIA KA HALA HAWAII MA KAHI HOIKEIKE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 26, Aoao 5. Iune 25, 1909.

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More on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Expo, 1909.

THE HAWAIIAN GIRLS HEADED TO THE EXPOSITION IN SEATTLE

—Advertiser Photo.

Miss M. Mondon  Miss Pauline Evans  Miss Irene Boyd

Mrs. Charles Siemsen  Mrs. Will Cooper  Miss Wattie Holt

It was aboard the steamship Almeda which left on Wednesday that these girls of Honolulu, as shown above in the picture, to go to the exposition being held in Seattle.

They went to go  view the various displays of Hawaii nei sent there to show the world some things from Hawaii nei, the place called the Paradise of the Pacific.

Before their leaving of the beloved community of Hawaii nei, there was held an audience with them along with a party at the residence of Governor Frear on the afternoon of this Tuesday.

They left under the care of Mrs. Will Cooper, and being that Mrs. Knudsen is already at the exposition ground, she will be the kamaaina there who will welcome these girls when they get there.

[See how much clearer the digital image available on Chronicling America is of the same picture in the Pacific Commercial Advertiser from the front page of 5/26/1909. Hopefully someday soon we will be able to rescan all of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers to get the clearest images of not only the pictures, but of the text, so everything is clearly legible!]

(Kuokoa, 5/28/1909, p. 1)

NA KAIKAMAHINE HAWAII NO KA HOIKEIKE MA SEATTLE

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 22, Aoao 1. Mei 28, 1909.

Hawaiians at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, 1909.

Check out this picture and more from the Hawaii delegation at the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, online at the University of Washington Digital Collections site!

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=%2Fayp&CISOPTR=538&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=802&DMHEIGHT=623.4296875&DMMODE=viewer&DMFULL=1&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=%2520hawaii&DMTHUMB=0&REC=12&DMROTATE=0&x=801&y=314

Hawaiian officials, hostesses, and musicians in front of the Hawaii Building, Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition, Seattle, August 5, 1909.

How much do we know about how it was back then… 1909.

THE WORLD IS STILL IN THE DARK ABOUT HAWAII.

Although there has been so many stories heard talking about Hawaii and its people and its many wonderful things, in no way has the ignorance of some people in foreign lands about Hawaii been cleared; they assume Hawaii is an uneducated land and that we are cannibals.

On the return of someone who went to visit the fair in Seattle [Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition], he spoke about the arrival of a haole woman who didn’t know about the conditions of Hawaii; and she put before the Hawaiian girls a great number of questions—questions which made it plain that she had no clue about this era of education here in Hawaii.

When she saw a pineapple, she didn’t believe that it was real, because she poked at it with her finger, perhaps thinking that it was just some decoration, or perhaps butter [butter sculpture seems to have been popular at the time].

When she approached the area where the Hawaiian girls were stationed to talk about Hawaii nei as well as to give various performances, she asked one of them:

“Are you all real Hawaiian girls?” she asked while peering at each one of the beautiful Hawaiian girls over her gold-rimmed glasses.

“We are all Hawaiian girls,” she was answered kindly and very politely.

“How long has it been since your arrival here?” She asked next.

“This is our fourth day here,” she was answered again, with a pleasant voice and decorum.

“Your English is quite good. Where did you all learn it?”

“Upon our arrival here, we tried learning this language.”

“Is that so. And where did you all get your clothes?”

“We got it here in Seattle; we purchased it.”

“I thought that maybe you all don’t much wear clothes in the Hawaiian Islands; but you all still are cannibals, right?”

These girls could not endure this any longer after those last words of that malihini woman; they were very well appreciated for their etiquette, pleasantness, and their entire conduct which would receive no criticism from the visitors; however, with this woman, they were asked questions that they could not fathom, and that woman perhaps was close to being railed at were it not for the arrival of Will J. Cooper who advised the woman to go and look at the fish located in a different area.

(Kuokoa, 8/27/1909, p. 6)

KE MAU NEI NO KA NOHO POULIULI O KE AO NO HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 35, AoAo 6. Augate 27, 1909.