Early days of the Hokulea, 1975.

Canoes blessed, voyaging society tests the water

By BRUCE BENSON
Advertiser Science Writer

At least a thousand people sat silent on the beach yesterday, watching a Polynesian canoe-blessing ritual not seen since the days of Kamehameha.

Then with hoots and hollers from the crowd, a hundred hands tugged on the lines to send a spanking-new double-hulled canoe down the ways and into Kaneohe Bay. After some two years of dreaming, the Polynesian Voyaging Society was afloat.

The society is a nonprofit group made up of everyone from just average folks to highly skilled artisans and scientists and they are all pursuing the same goal:

To attempt to send the 6–foot canoe launched yesterday to Tahiti and back next summer, using the methods and tools of the Polynesians who first sailed to Hawaii more than a thousand years ago. Continue reading

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New kahili made by Keahi Luahine, 1920.

CEREMONY MARKS TRANSFER OF FINE PAGEANT KAHILIS

Fourteen magnificent kahilis, completed after three months of painstaking toil by a Hawaiian, Keahi Luahine, of Kakaako, especially for the great Missionary Centennial Pageant of Tuesday next, were last evening, at 7 o’clock, ceremoniously conveyed from Kakaako to Bishop Hall, Punahou.

The ceremonies attending the transfer were such as would have been held in honor of such royal symbols in the past. They are replicas of kahilis now in the Bishop museum. Continue reading

Kamehameha Day, 100 years ago, 1917.

KAMEHAMEHA DAY.

According to Chairman Edgar Henriques of the Celebration Committee for the coming 11th of June, the Program for the Celebration has been prepared; starting on Sunday the 10th will be the memorial in Kawaiahao Church, and on the following 11th will be the parade from Aala Park to the Palace Grounds, in this manner:

8:30 A. M. The procession of all of the Hawaiian Associations from Aala Park to the Kamehameha Statue, and from there to the Palace Grounds where speeches of the day will be held. Continue reading

Death of Edgar Henriques, 1931.

THAT KAMAAINA, EDGAR HENRIQUES, HAS LEFT THIS LIFE BEHIND

The kamaaina, Mr. Edgar Henriques, has left us, after being ill for a long time, at Queen’s Hospital at 4:30 in the afternoon of this past Sunday. He was 65 years old.

On June 14th, he returned to Queen’s Hospital. The following Wednesday he was operated upon. The doctor’s knowledge could not save his life.

His funeral was held at their home in the uplands of Nuuanu on Mamalahoa Street, the old road going to the cliff of Nuuanu, at 4 o’clock in the afternoon this past Tuesday. Continue reading

Words of advice from Kamehameha I, 1891.

BE PATIENT.

O Friends, Companions, those who go hand in hand with the Leo, who walk together on the sands of Kakuhihewa moistened by the Kukalahale rains, living from Maunalua to Moanalua. Greetings to you all.

Remember the title above, “I nui ke aho.” This is one of the touching statements said by our Land Conqueror [Na’i Aina], when one of his warriors was pierced by a barbed spear; when he saw this predicament, he grabbed and pulled the spear, and that is when the warrior cried out in pain. But that conqueror of aina responded quickly while shedding tears, “My son, be patient.” Continue reading

Who is this wahine? (conclusion), 1909.

…Kamehameha asked: “Which Kawaihae are you going to?”

“To Kawaihae Kai, near the capital where the alii lives,” answered the woman.

“So what is that bundle you hold in your hand?” Kamehameha questioned.

The woman responded, “A bundle of Lipalu seaweed.”

With that Kamehameha said: “Say woman, I am one of the alii’s men, and my occupation is one of the messengers for the alii. And being that I have clearly heard your fine words, I am hopeful that should the alii hear me about the words of appreciation of yours for him, then you will be given some land for yourself. Continue reading

Who is this wahine? 1909.

ENLIGHTENED DEEDS OF THE CHIEFS.

And here is something else: When Kamehameha I went to the Kohala districts from Kawaihae to hear the thoughts of the makaainana like those shown earlier, as he turned back with haste so that he would reach the seaside of Kawaihae before it was light, he came upon an old woman and asked her: “Where are you going in the darkness?” “I am going to Kawaihae,” replied the woman. “Aren’t you afraid of being ambushed at night while you walk this desolate field. Just by yourself?” Kamehameha then asked of the woman. “I have no fear, for this plain is protected because of our alii, Paiea.”

“The old men go, the old women go, and the children go and sleep on these pathways, and there is no one at all who will bother them, for that is a strict law that our alii has placed. And the person who disobeys the law of our alii is a dead man; he will not live,”  answered the woman, not knowing that it was Paiea who was talking with her.

When Kamehameha heard these fine words of the woman, he further asked the woman. “So how is the way of life of the alii with his makaainana? Is it good sometimes and bad sometimes?”

The woman answered with no fear before her late night travelling companion, “There has been no time in which our alii has been bad to us, but he has always been good. And it is because of this goodness of our alii that wrongdoers are fearful, and it is thus that I can dare to walk alone across the desolate field,” the woman replied.

When Kamehameha heard once again the woman expounding on why he was good, he said [to himself], “I am indeed beneficent to my people, and the proof of this good is that this woman dares to travel this lonely field alone.” Therefore,…

[To be continued.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 7/1/1909, p 1)

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Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke IV, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iulai 1, 1909.