Death of Edgar Henriques, 1931.

THAT KAMAAINA, EDGAR HENRIQUES, HAS LEFT THIS LIFE BEHIND

The kamaaina, Mr. Edgar Henriques, has left us, after being ill for a long time, at Queen’s Hospital at 4:30 in the afternoon of this past Sunday. He was 65 years old.

On June 14th, he returned to Queen’s Hospital. The following Wednesday he was operated upon. The doctor’s knowledge could not save his life.

His funeral was held at their home in the uplands of Nuuanu on Mamalahoa Street, the old road going to the cliff of Nuuanu, at 4 o’clock in the afternoon this past Tuesday. Continue reading

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Words of advice from Kamehameha I, 1891.

BE PATIENT.

O Friends, Companions, those who go hand in hand with the Leo, who walk together on the sands of Kakuhihewa moistened by the Kukalahale rains, living from Maunalua to Moanalua. Greetings to you all.

Remember the title above, “I nui ke aho.” This is one of the touching statements said by our Land Conqueror [Na’i Aina], when one of his warriors was pierced by a barbed spear; when he saw this predicament, he grabbed and pulled the spear, and that is when the warrior cried out in pain. But that conqueror of aina responded quickly while shedding tears, “My son, be patient.” Continue reading

Who is this wahine? (conclusion), 1909.

…Kamehameha asked: “Which Kawaihae are you going to?”

“To Kawaihae Kai, near the capital where the alii lives,” answered the woman.

“So what is that bundle you hold in your hand?” Kamehameha questioned.

The woman responded, “A bundle of Lipalu seaweed.”

With that Kamehameha said: “Say woman, I am one of the alii’s men, and my occupation is one of the messengers for the alii. And being that I have clearly heard your fine words, I am hopeful that should the alii hear me about the words of appreciation of yours for him, then you will be given some land for yourself. Continue reading

Who is this wahine? 1909.

ENLIGHTENED DEEDS OF THE CHIEFS.

And here is something else: When Kamehameha I went to the Kohala districts from Kawaihae to hear the thoughts of the makaainana like those shown earlier, as he turned back with haste so that he would reach the seaside of Kawaihae before it was light, he came upon an old woman and asked her: “Where are you going in the darkness?” “I am going to Kawaihae,” replied the woman. “Aren’t you afraid of being ambushed at night while you walk this desolate field. Just by yourself?” Kamehameha then asked of the woman. “I have no fear, for this plain is protected because of our alii, Paiea.”

“The old men go, the old women go, and the children go and sleep on these pathways, and there is no one at all who will bother them, for that is a strict law that our alii has placed. And the person who disobeys the law of our alii is a dead man; he will not live,”  answered the woman, not knowing that it was Paiea who was talking with her.

When Kamehameha heard these fine words of the woman, he further asked the woman. “So how is the way of life of the alii with his makaainana? Is it good sometimes and bad sometimes?”

The woman answered with no fear before her late night travelling companion, “There has been no time in which our alii has been bad to us, but he has always been good. And it is because of this goodness of our alii that wrongdoers are fearful, and it is thus that I can dare to walk alone across the desolate field,” the woman replied.

When Kamehameha heard once again the woman expounding on why he was good, he said [to himself], “I am indeed beneficent to my people, and the proof of this good is that this woman dares to travel this lonely field alone.” Therefore,…

[To be continued.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 7/1/1909, p 1)

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Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke IV, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iulai 1, 1909.

Thoughts for the upcoming Kamehameha Day, 1920.

THEY ARE TRUE HAWAIIANS BUT THEY CANNOT SING HAWAIIAN SONGS.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Maybe at 3 o’clock or so in the morning of Friday, June 11, 1920, that being the birthday of the Nation Conqueror Kamehameha, there came to my home some singing boys, and this was something; it was a familiar thing where on holidays this and that person came around singing at houses lived in by Hawaiians.

Before the singers came, I got the idea that since these singers were coming to my home, I would get up and listen to the singing outside on the lanai like I was accustomed to in past years; it was not long before I heard strains of a guitar, and the singing started, but it was from my bedroom that I was listening. Continue reading

Still Our Museum Today! 1900.

OUR MUSEUM

The Bishop Collection of Curios.

One of the Most Interesting Sights In Honolulu Pleasantly Described.

HONOLULU, Feb. 8.—Above the inner entrance to the Museum of Hawaiian and Polynesian History is a tablet of polished mottled stone, in which is engraved in letters of gold the following inscription:

To the Memory of
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP,
FOUNDER OF THE KAMEHA-
MEHA SCHOOLS OF HO-
NOLULU.
A Bright Light Among Her Peo-
ple; Her Usefulness Survives
Her Earthly Life.

A Bernice Pauahi, she was related to the royal family of the Kamehameha dynasty, and the cousin of Queen Emma, two women who have indelibly inscribed their names upon the hearts of…

BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP.

…all Hawaiians, whether by birth of association. She married the Hon. C. R. Bishop, and with her immense wealth and her kindly deeds through life, created a new life among the Hawaiians. Upon her death she left most of her wealth to endow the Kamehameha Schools, a separate school for boys and a separate one for girls. These schools are kept up entirely from the income of her estates, which have become so vast as to render it necessary to erect other buildings throughout the Islands in order to expend the revenue. In memory of his wife, the Hon. C. R. Bishop dedicated the museum in her name, laying aside a princely endowment. Collectors have scoured the Hawaiian Islands for curios of historical and intrinsic value and have succeeded by the most diligent effort and at great expense, in depositing in the museum an invaluable collection of ancient materials which would warm the cockles of the antiquarian’s heart beyond measure. Calabashes, large and small, ancient and modern, have come into the museum; some were in the possession of families, relics passed from one generation to another; others were found in the caves where in ancient times were buried kings and chiefs. Idols of grotesque shapes, dedicated to all the elements of nature, good and evil; some dedicated to Pele, the Goddess of Volcanoes; others to the poison god and to the fish god; some made of stone, others of the valuable koa and kou woods; one made of the trunk of the poison tree, its wood, upon being steeped in water, being a most powerful, yet undetectable poison which acts upon the heart, and which was used by the kahunas and chiefs. Beautiful feather cloaks of wonderful sheen and delicate texture, worn by Kamehameha the Great during his tour of conquest a century ago. Continue reading

Some of the battles of Kalaniopuu, 1866.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I.”]

The battles between Kalaniopuu, the King of Hawaii, with Kahekili, the King of Maui.

The years 1775, 1776, 1777, 1778, and 1778. Kalaniopuu went to war at Kaupo on Maui, with his Alii, his war Officers, and his soldiers. Kalaniopuu first went to war at Kaupo, and he tortured the makaainana of Kaupo by clubbing their foreheads with his war club [newa]. This battle was called Kalaehohoa [“Clubbing-of-the-Forehead”] Continue reading