Travels of King Kamehameha IV to see the sounding sands of Nohili and more, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

We hear of the sailing of the King from here, and on the next day he landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night, he sailed to Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They spent the Sabbath there, and joined together and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the weekday, the rode horse, fished; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. That evening, they got on board the Maria and sailed for Kaula. The next morning they reached there. Some of them jumped into the ocean and swam ashore with difficulty, for there was a shark there and it was difficult to go ashore; there is a severe cliff and no bay. The King went ashore amongst these difficulties, ascended the cliff. The chiefesses remained on the ship. Continue reading

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Kamehameha IV travels to the west, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

It was heard that the King went from  here and on the next day landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night sailed for Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They were there on the Sabbath, and they congregated and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the next day, they rode horses and went fishing; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. Continue reading

Deer from Molokai gifted by C. R. Bishop to a California zoo, 1893.

SOME FAWNS.

The steamer Mokolii brought from Kalae, Molokai, two young Deer.

These young Deer will be sent all the way to California, for a Zoo in that state of the United States. The fawn are spotted white and red.

According to the Captain of the steamship Mokolii, about these young Deer, they are a gift of C. R. Bishop to a Park in California, for these Deer are not seen in America; only red deer are seen there, not these type; and therefore they are being taken there. To be proliferated in America. Continue reading

J. E. Chamberlain, collector for the Hawaiian National Museum, 1876.

Curios for the Government Museum.

The Morning Star brought up for the Hawaiian Government the following curios, corals, &c. Two sets Gilbert Island armor complete with helmets; also shark teeth sword and spear, mats and native dresses; eel basket; common fish basket; umbrella coral, three feet six inches in diameter, perfect, from Apian by Mr. Randolph.

From Marshall Island: Spears, Male fringe petticoats and woman’s mat dress; carved figure-head; model of canoe fully rigged; paddles; red coral; black coral; platter coral, bone adzes from Strong’s Island. Continue reading

George Vancouver arrives once more on February 14, 1793.

[Found under: “He Moolelo Hawaii”]

Vancouver Returns

In the month of February, the 14 day, 1793, Vancouver [Vanekouwa] returned to Hawaii nei, from the northwest of America, and landed at Kawaihae.

The men pleaded for guns and powder from him. Vancouver refused and would not sell those sort things to them. There was great desire of Hawaiians for those things during those days, because it was a time of war, and Kamehameha was conquering the nation then; Oahu and Kauai remained.

And from there, Vancouver landed at Kealakekua, on the 22nd of that month and met with Kamehameha.

At that time, he gifted Kamehameha with two cattle, a bull and a cow. The cattle that Vancouver brought were from Monterey, a land in America.

These animals were greatly appreciated by Hawaiians because they were unusual, and they were called puaa pipi. It is from those pipi that the cattle which roam these days at Waimea and Maunakea and the other forests of Hawaii proliferated.

Kamehameha treated Vancouver kindly; Vancouver was facing hardship without water and took his water barrels into the uplands, and Kamehameha commanded his men to carry the barrels and to fill them with water. Continue reading