Frogs, 1903.

The Business of Raising and Selling Frogs.

Representative Andrade said he will build a frog breeding grounds in some of his taro patches at Manoa, And according to him, the requests for frog legs for eating in this town is increasing. Currently, Hilo is where frog is eaten a lot, and when Honolulu people see the progress of those in this business, they will think of building a place to raise those animals.

Mr. Andrade believes that profits from this business will grow and he will start this venture in Manoa, and according to him, it will not be long for Honolulu people to wait before they will see his juicy frog on tables at restaurants in town.

(Kuokoa, 7/17/1903, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLI, Helu 29, Aoao 5. Iulai 17, 1903.

Kahoolawe leased to R. C. Wyllie, 1858.

Kahoolawe–This island was leased to his Excellency R. C. Wyllie [ka mea hanohano R. C. Wale] for 20 years at $505 per year to the Government–Wyllie wants to turn the Island into a sheep ranch.

(Hae Hawaii, 4/14/1858, p. 6)

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 3, Ano Hou—Helu 2. Aperila 14, 1858.

Did Kamehameha IV Have Bears? Oh my! 1857,

Aboard the ship the Yankee were five Deer, from California, and they went to the Royal Hawaiian Agriculture Society, of the King. And aboard that ship the Yankee, were some Terrapin and Frogs, and many types of plants. Haole buy those fine things with the thought they would have fruit in the future.

Bears.–Brought aboard the ship the Metropolis, Capt. Preston, from Oregon, were two Cinnamon Bears, and they were given to the King.

(Hae Hawaii, 12/2/1857, p. 142)

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou—Helu 2, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 2, 1857.

Hillebrand brings in frogs, 1857.

Something New.

Kauka Makaainana (Dr. Hillebrand) has five FROGS [RANA] from California and he has put them in his taro patch. They are doing fine. They make strange noises. Their nature is that they are animals that have two lives. They eat small bugs: flies, grasshoppers, and other things like that. Therefore they are good. O People of Honolulu, do not harm these new things if you see them, because they are valuable.

(Hae Hawaii, 9/30/1857, p. 106)

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou—Helu 27, Aoao 106. Sepetemaba 30, 1857.

On the first horses in Hawaii nei, 1852.

Who Brought the First Horses to the Islands?—In a valuable document presented by Stephen Reynolds, Esq., to the R. H. A. Society at its first meeting in 1850, the following passage occurs:—Horses.—I have not been able to find the name of him who introduced the first. It appears two were brought and presented to Kamehameha; the natives say Mr. Manine was in the vessel. Several were brought before 1823. From 1824 to 1838 many cargoes were brought from California. The horses born and reared on the islands are superior in all respects to those imported from California,—better limbs, better spirits, and tougher animals.” Continue reading

In less than 10 years Old Oakum is just a character with half a name, 1906.

Old Oakum, a Character in Honolulu Long Ago

“Old Oakum” was one of the odd characters of Honolulu u to about thirty years ago. He was a harmless creature whose one talent was that of collecting honey from bee trees without being stung. Where he came from or was born, or just what his nationality was, were matters not well known, for “Old Oakum” seemed to have forgotten all about himself long before coming to Honolulu which must have been in the early 50s. Continue reading

More on bees and the man known to Hawaiians as Okamu haole, 1897.

An Industry That Has Made Rapid Strides.

It would be a difficult thing to fix the date of the beginning of the bee industry in the Hawaiian Islands. As far back as the “oldest inhabitant” can run his thoughts, honey has been gathered in the mountains. Back in the ’60s one of the characters of the city was Dwight Holcomb, known to the small boys and natives as “Old Oakum.” He was an eccentric individual and was the “bogie man” to the young boys of that time. Continue reading