Neutrality proclaimed by King Kamehameha III, 1854.

Proclamation.

Kamehameha III King of the Hawaiian Islands.

Be it known to all whom it may concern, that We, Kamehameha III, King of the Hawaiian Islands, hereby proclaim our entire Neutrality in the war now impending between the Great Maritime powers of Europe; that Our Neutrality is to be respected by all Belligerents, to the full extent of Our Jurisdiction, which by Our Fundamental laws is to the distance of one of one marine league, surrounding each of our islands of Hawaii, Maui, Kahoolawe, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai and Niihau, commencing at low water mark on each of the respective coasts of said Islands, and includes all channels passing between and dividing said islands, from Island to island; that all captures and sizures made within Our said Jurisdiction are unlawful; and that the protection andd hospitality of Our Ports, Harbors and Roads, shall be equally extended to all the belligerents, so long as they respect Our neutrality. Continue reading

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Kamehameha III’s new royal standard, 1845.

Foreign Office, May 14th, 1845.

Sir,—I am commanded by the King, to make known to you His Majesty’s thanks for the kind courtesy with which you have allowed one of your men to prepare his Royal Standard, according to the national devices arranged at the Herald’s Office, in London. Continue reading

The extent of the Hawaiian Kingdom, 1857.

By Authority.

[CIRCULAR.]

Department of Foreign Relations,
City of Honolulu, 16 March, 1856 [1857].

Sir:—I have the honor to make known to you that the following islands, &c., are within the domain of the Hawaiian Crown, viz:

Hawaii, containing about 4,000 square miles.

Maui, ” ” 600 ” “

Oahu, ” ” 520 ” “

Kauai, ” ” 520 ” “

Molokai, ” ” 170 ” “

Lanai, ” ” 100 ” “

Niihau, ” ” 80 ” “

Kahoolawe, ” ” 60 ” “

6,050

Nihoa, known as Bird Island.

Molokini, Lehua, Kaula, Islets, little more than barren rocks;—

and all Reefs, Banks and Rocks contiguous to either of the above, or within the compass of the whole.

With the highest respect, I have the honor to be, Sir,

Your most obd’t, humble servant,

R. C. WYLLIE.

To William Miller, Esq., H. B. M.’s Commissioner, &c. &c. &c.

Monsieur,

Monsieur Louis Emile Perrin, Consul Commissioner and Plenipotentiary, of H. I. M., &c. &c. &c.

Hon. David L. Gregg, U. S. Commissioner, &c., &c., &c.

(Polynesian, 3/28/1857, p. 2)

Polynesian_3_28_1857_2.png

The Polynesian, Volume XIII, Number 47, Page 2. March 28, 1857.

 

 

More on the transfer of the remains of the Alii to Maunaala, 1865.

Just as we announced in last week’s issue of our paper, that there would be a funeral for the Minister of Foreign Affairs [Kuhina o ko na Aina e], it was indeed carried out. After the night prayer [pule poeleele] of the Anglican Church [Halepule Hoomana Enelani] was over, the body of R. C. Wyllie was taken from his residence at Nuuanu to the Church at Peleula, where it was left until the funeral procession to his permanent home, that being on a following day.

When the sun reached its heights, the military boys were seen crowded together in the grounds of the Palace. The Cavalry [Puali Koa Kaua Lio] under Captain C. H. Judd, the Artillery Division [? Koa Pukaa] under Captain J. H. Brown, the regular soldiers [? Koa ku mau] under Captain Kahoohuli, the Hulumanu Division [Koa Hulumanu] under Captain J. M. Kapena, the Rifle Squad [Koa Raifela] under Captain Hassinger. From the Palace, they moved on to the Church, and there many people of all sorts who waited with great hope that they would take part in the procession taking him to be left in peace where we all must go with no delay when fetched by the heartless ruler of the pit.

After the prayer for him was over, a procession was organized by the Marshall for the day, John O. Dominis, and the procession marched quietly to the Royal Cemetery at Maunaala. Most of the businesses were closed that day, and everyone went to watch the funeral procession; the sides of the streets were filled with men, women, and children. When the remains entered the Cemetery, and right after, the troops and the artillery division sounded their guns for him. However before his funeral, the Fort at Puowaina shot off minute guns until he was at the Cemetery.

It was as if while the group of onlookers watched him being taken away, all of the people were were reeling with painful sorrow in their hearts. Who would not be without aloha, for he lived until well known in the calm of Hauola, and should he have had a partner, he would have had many grandchildren, but he lived alone and did not multiply in the uplands of Kawananakoa. He has gone, but has left a Monument for himself, not in the city, or on the side of the streets of our town, but on the sides of the history of our Nation, and in the hearts of this generation, and all of the generations to come. When he entered the Tomb, the crowd scattered and went back with a heavy heart.

After the sun returned to the surface of the sea, another funeral was readied, and that funeral to move to a new place our

Alii’s Remains,

and here are their names below, as is written on their coffins:

(1) Jane Lahilahi Kaeo, Died Jan 12, 1862, Aged 50 years.

(2) T. C. Byde Rooke, F. R. C. S. Born May 18, 1806, Died May 28, 1858.

(3) Keoni Ana, Born on the 12th of March, 1810, Died July 18, 1857.

(4) B. Namakeha, Died 27 Dec. 1860, At 52 years of age.

(5) John William Pitt Kinau, Born Dec. 27, 1842, Died on the 9th of Sept. 1857.

(6) Elisabeta Kaahumanu, Born 1793, Died 1842.

(7) Kamehameha 2d, Elii no nahina o Awhai, Make i Pelekani 28 Makaiki Kaiku, I ke mahoe mua o Kamakaiki 1824, Aloha ino no komako Elii Iolani.
Kamehameha 2nd King of the Sandwich Islands, Died July 14th, 1824, In London, in the 28th year of his age, May we remember our beloved King Iolani.

(8) Kamehamalu Elii no na aina o awahi, Make i Pelekani, 22 ma Raiki Teitu, London 8 Re mahoe o Re ma Raiki 1824.
Tamehamalu, Queen of the Sandwich Islands, Departed this life in London on the 8 July 1824, Aged 22 years.

(9) Kaahumanu II died Apr. 4, 1839 in Her 33rd Year.

(10) In this casket is the daughter [? son] of Kamehameha III, Keaweaweulaokalani; there is nothing inscribed on the casket.

(11) Kamehameha III, born on the 17th of March 1813, Died 15th December 1854, He reigned for 29 years.

(12) His Highness, Albert Edward Kauikeaouli, Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Haku o Hawaii, Born on the 27th of May, 1858, died on the 27th of August, 1862. Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of God.

(13) Alexander Kalanikua Liholiho, Iolani Maka o Iouli Kunuiakea, Kukailimoku, Kamehameha IV, King of the Hawaiian Islands. Born Feberuary 9, 1834, succeeded to the Throne, December 15, 1854. Died November 30, 1863.

(14) Mose Kekuaiwa, Born July 20, 1829, Died November 29, 1848.

(15) Davida Tamehameha, Born on May 20, 1828, Died December 15, 1835. He was 7 years, 6 months, and 16 days old.

(16) Leleiohoku, Born March 21, 1821, Died October 21, 1848.

(17) A. Paki, Born Aug. 1808, Died June 13th, 1855.

(18) L. Konia, Wife of A. Paki, Born 1808, Died July 2nd, 1857.

(19) Keolaokalani Paki Bishop, Born Dec. 30, 1862, Died Aug. 29, 1863.

(20) Kamanele, Died May 7, 1831, at 19 Years of Age.

(21) Liloa and Lonoikamakahiki.

When the stifling rays of the sun left, and when the dim moon shown over the peaceful town, the torches glowed red, lighting up the bones of the Alii as they were carried on palanquins [manele], to lie and be placed in the new building made with fine craftsmanship for their physical remains, for they returned to the eternal home of this life, death snatching without compassion, and dragged them off without a cry [?? ke ka-ua aku] being heard.

Death, according to one poet, is something terribly frightening. This is true; we understand that death is something very awesome, because it is not known where it will come, from the lowly hovel to perhaps at the door of the Palace.

“Ka ilihune, ka poe waiwai,
Ka poe kiekie, a me ka poe haahaa,
Na ka make e hoiliwai like ia lakou.”

[“The poor, the rich,
The high, and the low,
Death makes them all equal.”]

Death is something regular, everyday we hear the ringing of the funerary bells, and we always are witness to the funerary processions cloaked in mourning clothes, following after their friends to his resting place—the grave. As these people are taken away, we look—and each of them go to our occupations in this life; some look for their fortune, while other for fame, and glory. But when are Alii are taken away, trapped by the tireless hands of death, we all unassumingly consider, looking back upon the history of his life, and weigh.

“Ina ua kupono ia no ka lani i ka lani,
Ina aole ia i kupono nolaila, i Gehena.”

[“If befitting for heaven, then to heaven,
If not befitting for there, then to hell.”]

[See more on the Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s instagram post here.]

(Au Okoa, 11/6/1865, p. 2)

E like me ka makou mea i hoolaha aku ai...

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 29, Aoao 2. Novemaba 6, 1865.

Lady Jane Franklin in Hawaii nei, 1861.

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

A Memento of Hawaii.—We strolled into Mr. Lafrenz’s cabinet shop a day or two since, to see some specimens of domestic cabinet ware, recently made by him. They consisted of two chests, manufactured by order of Mr. Wyllie, out of our native woods, and are intended as presents from His Excellency to lady Franklin and her niece Miss Cracroft. The larger of the two is made of koa, edged with ebony wood. The lid is tastefully decorated with various kinds of wood, and in the center is a square of black ebony inlaid, in which are bronze and pearl designs, with a small silver-plate, on which is inscribed “Lady Franklin, Honolulu, 1861.” The inside of the chest is lined with sandal-wood, which emits a most fragrant and pleasant odor. The whole is finished with French polish, and as a specimen of art in these islands, and as a memento of her visit here and of the generous donor, will no doubt be highly prized by her ladyship. The second chest, intended for Miss Cracroft, is quite small, but finished in the same style. We give the varieties of wood used: koa, kauwila, kou, koala, sandal-wood and black ebony; all native woods, except the last, which is from Ascension Island. As a specimen of cabinet ware, we have no fear of its being surpassed by the native products of any other country that may undertake to rival it.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 5/16/1861, p. 2)

A Memento of Hawaii.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume V, Number 46, Page 2. Mei 16, 1861.

The Chiefs’ Children’s School and its beginnings. 1844.

Schools and Seminaries.—In the very important point of providing instruction for all classes, as in every other duty connected with their sacred calling, the missionaries stand prominent. With them, I believe, resides the merit of having excited the chiefs to desire a school for the systematic education of their children of both sexes. With the concurrence of the king and chiefs, in 1839, the American mission selected for that purpose Mr. & Mrs. Cooke, who were assistant missionaries. Having lately at the request of Dr. Judd, visited the school daily, to watch the progress of a disease, bearing more resemblance to the “typhus mitior” of “Cullen,” than any other known types of fever, I have been an eye-witness to the anxious and parental-like care of Mr. & Mrs. Cooke, both of the sick and healthy children of the chiefs; and I am prepared to state from observation, that a more proper selection could not have been made.

The school-room is very commodiously arranged. Strict order and obedience are observed, without any exertion of authority approaching to harshness. Books, maps, stationery, gloves (terrestrial and celestial,) are at all times within the access of the scholars, and there is an excellent apparatus to illustrate the movements of the planets which compose our solar system.

(Friend, August 1, 1844, p. 35)

37. Schools and Seminaries.

The Friend, Volume II, Number VIII, Page 35. August 1, 1844.

The following is a list of the young chiefs at present in the school of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke:

NAMES. WHEN BORN FATHER MOTHER ADOPTED BY
*Alexander Liholiho, 9 Feb. 1834. Kekuanaoa. Kinau. Kamehameha III.
†Moses Kekuaiwa, 20 July 1829. ditto. ditto. Kaieoewa [Kaikioewa].
‡Lot Kamehameha, 11 Dec. 1830. ditto. ditto. Hoapili.
‖William Charles Lunalilo, 31 Jan. 1835. Kanaina. **Kekauluohi.
Peter Young Kaeo, 4 March 1836. Kaeo. Lahilahi. John Young.
James Kaliokalani, 29 May 1835. Pakea [Kapaakea]. Keohokalole. Aikanaka.
David Kalakaua, 16 Nov. 1836. ditto. ditto. Haaheo Kania [Kaniu].
§Victoria Kamamalu, 4 Nov. 1838. Kekuanaoa. Kinau.
Bernice Pauahi, 19 Dec. 1831. Paki. Konia. Kinau.
Abigail [Lanihau] Maheha, 10 July 1832. Namaile. Liliha. Kekauonohi.
¶Jane Loeau, 5 Dec. 1828. Kalaiulumoku [Kalaniulumoku] [Liliha.] Kaukualii.
Elizabeth Kekaniau [Kekaaniau], 11  Sept. 1834. Laanui. Oana.
Emma Rooke, 2 Jan. 1836. Naea. Kekela. T. C. B. Rooke, M. D.
Lydia Makaeha [Kamakaeha], 2 Sept. 1838. Pakea [Kapaakea]. Keohokalole. Paki & Konia.
Polly Paaaina, 1833. Henry Lewis. Kekala [Kekela]. John Ii.

*Heir apparent to the crown. (The king having no children.)
†Governor presumptive of Kauai.
‡Gov. presumpt. of maui. (Now convalescing from fever.)
‖Convalescing from fever—(25th May.)
§Heir apparent to the premiership.
¶Half-sister of Abigail.
**The premier.

Nor do Mr. & Mrs. Cooke neglect to impress upon their pupils that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and religion the basis of all private and public worth. A portion of scripture is read morning and evening, with singing and prayer, in the presbyterian form of family worship.

On Sundays, the pupils regularly attend two services in native, by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong, and one in English, by the Rev. Mr. Damon.

Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, both by precept and the example of their own well regulated family, enforce the utmost propriety of moral deportment, and every punctilio of cleanliness, dress, manner and address, calculated to add the polish of refinement to more solid and useful attainments.

The pupils rise with the sun, breakfast at 7 A. M., dine at 1 o’clock, take tea at 6 P. M., and retire early to rest. At table, Mr. and Mrs. Cooke always preside, and there is an abundant supply of good and substantial food.¹

The school hours are from 9 to 12 A. M., and from 2 to 5 P. M.

The medical care of the pupils has devolved upon Dr. G. P. Judd, who not withstanding his onerous and multifarious duties as secretary of state for foreign affairs, head of the financial department, &c., &c., always finds time to attend, when wanted. i myself have been an eye-witness of the extreme anxiety and tenderness with which he watched the progress of the fever of little William, whose symptoms were, for several weeks, very alarming. And it is but right I should add that his good and exemplary lady was a frequent visitor at the bed-side of the sick child.

It is impossible, in any part of the world, that sick children could have been better looked after, than were William, Lot and Jane, by Dr. Judd, and Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, whether as regards the curative or nursing department.

Amongst other things pleasing to observe, was the great concern and affection of the parents, especially in the case of William, who was the only one in real danger.

The pupils are encouraged in the gymnastical exercises which tend to develop the physical powers and fortify the constitution. Among these are playing ball, flying kites, cultivation of flowers, swinging, see-sawing, walking, and riding on horseback.

To me it is a most pleasing scene to see them all, boys and girls, well attired and well mounted, merry and good humored, curvetting, galloping and turning round their horses with great dexterity. This pleasure I have, almost every evening during my rides, as I seldom fail to meet and ride on part of my way with them.

When Admiral Thomas was here, he was always glad to see them at his house, and to encourage them to go out to tea-parties at the houses of respectable foreign residents here. I have thus met the young chiefs often in society, and I have always found that they support their part in the conversation, in English, with much decorum and propriety. In fact, there is nothing perceptible in their manner or habits that could strike a stranger as differing much from the manners and habits of young English or Americans of the same age.

Each child or pupil has from two to six native attendants, namely: tailors, washers, grooms, &c., according to the age, rank and sex of each; and these are all under the direction of John Ii and his wife, both most respectable natives, who cooperate with Mr. and Mrs. Cooke in excluding these attendants from any intercourse of intimacy with the young chiefs that could communicate to them their own vices, prejudices and superstitions.

Mr. Cooke assures me that in every department of education, they show a readiness and docility quite equal to any other children, of the same ages, and under the same circumstances.

If is evident that under his and Mrs. Cooke’s tuition, these young chiefs will go forth into the world and assume their respective stations, having a fund of general knowledge vastly superior to what is sometimes found in the riders of extensive provinces, and even some republics in Spanish America. It is equally obvious that the administration of these future rulers must be immeasurably more enlightened than any that has ever before existed in these islands; and when they come into power, a new and better order of things may be expected.

This most useful institution, fraught with so many blessings present and prospective, temporal and spiritual, is supported at an expense to the government of about $2000 yearly. This is all that is allowed to Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, for their own salaries, for finding the table, domestics and all incidental expenses. To me it is incomprehensible how they can do so much, with so little.

The clothing is found by the parents or guardians of the pupils. It is supplied in abundance and good taste.

Separate rooms are provided for every two of the pupils; and the apartments are clean, well furnished and well ventilated. There are in all 17 rooms of various dimensions, opening into a court 36 feet square, with windows on the outside, which is 76 feet square. The whole building cost originally little more than $2000, though it is solidly constructed with sun-dried bricks (adobes) with a well thatched roof. But the furniture must have cost a great deal, as no comfort, in that respect, that can be imagined, is wanting.

The Rev. Mr. Dibble says that the king, when surveying the happy group, and noticing their improvement, remarked: “I wish my lot had been like yours; I deeply regret the foolish manner in which I spent the years of my youth;” and I would venture to add, that the king has more reason to be proud of this chiefs’ school than of any thing within his dominion.

(Friend, August 1, 1844, p. 36)

The following is a list...

The Friend, Volume II, Number VIII, Page 36. August 1, 1844.

¹This comment about the abundance of food reminded me of something Liliuokalani said in Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen. “…our instructors were especially particular to teach us the proper use of the English language; but when I recall the instances in which we were sent hungry to bed, it seems to me that they failed to remember that we were growing children. A thick slice of bread covered with molasses was usually the sole article of our supper, and we were sometimes ingenious, if not over honest, in our search for food: if we could beg something of the cook it was the easier way; but if not, anything eatable left within our reach was surely confiscated. As a last resort, we were not above searching the gardens for any esculent root or leaf, which (having inherited the art of igniting a fire from the friction of sticks), we could cook and consume without the knowledge of our preceptors.”

Speaking of Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, i was expecting the new much-awaited edition to be available already, but hopefully it will be out in bookstores soon! I am thinking of putting up related articles like this one (mostly from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers) to perhaps give a fuller picture of topics covered in the Queen’s book.

[This is written by Robert Crichton Wyllie, and is found in a very enlightening treatise describing many aspects of life in Honolulu in the 1840s. “NOTE On the Shipping, Trade, Agriculture, Climate, Diseases, Religious Institutions, Civil and Social Conditions, Mercantile and Financial Policy of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands, viewed in relation to other groups of islands, and to the natural and acquired advantages of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands.” Friend, June 1–September 24, 1844.]

Beginnings of the Anglican Church in Hawaii, 1862.

Pertaining to the 28th of November¹

This day known to everyone, the day of the return of independence to the Islands and the day chosen by the Monarchs as a day for the two of them to join the new faith which has recently arrived.

On the morning of that day, at the hour of 10½, the Alii arrived at the Church and the National troops [koa o ke Aupuni], the Honolulu Rifles [koa Rifles?], the Hawaii Kiai [?], and the Cavalry [Puali Kaua Lio] were all lined up.

When the Alii arrived and passed through the entrance, the Bishop came and layed his hand and blessed them. They then entered within and sat down; following them was a procession, and they entered while chanting one of the psalms. After this was done, the laying on of hands began, and they were confirmed as brethren of the new church.

The beauty that is imbued in all creatures of the earth is what left all of their subjects who went there awe-stricken. Some wept, some fled [hoonaholoholopoo?], some were downcast, and some shuddered in awe, appearing as if the spirit from the heavens was accepted in the Monarchs joining into the circle of eternal life.

Present was Her Highness Princess V. K. Kaahumanu, the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa, the Honorable R. C. Wyllie, the Honorable Chief Justice E. H. Allen, the Honorable C. R. Bishop and his wife, the Honorable C. Kapaakea, the Honorable Colonel D. Kalakaua, Colonel McKibbin Jr., Colonel W. C. Lunalilo, Major Hasslocher, Kekaaniau, the Dowager Queen K. Hakaleleponi, Mrs. Haalelea, the wives of the Supreme Court Judges, and the Honorable Ii. There also was W. W. F. Synge and his wife, along with the Consuls of Foreign Nations.

The building was filled with those wanting to witness the joining of the Monarchs as brethren, and everyone felt much appreciation for the beauty of the Royals, the Alii, and the ceremony performed. God save the King.

¹La Kuokoa [Hawaiian Independence Day]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 12/4/1862, p. 2)

No ka la 28 o Novemaba.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke 2, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 4, 1862.