J. H. Kanepuu speaks out about immigration and hooulu lahui, 1862.

Some Thoughts

FOR THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:

Some thoughts welled up within me pertaining to something printed by you on a page on the past 1st of March, Helu 14; about some matters dealing with increasing the people of our islands, if it is something appropriate to do. Continue reading

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On population, 1873.

Population of the Hawaiian Archipelago.

In this issue, we put before as a free paper for our readers the population chart of these Hawaiian Islands for the year 1872. For those who understand the population chart, they will think that it is something valuable, but for those who think it has no value, we should probably cover the important aspects. Continue reading

W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

Hooulu lahui, 1872.

[Found under: “NA OLELO HOOLAHA.”]

TO HAWAIIAN PARENTS.

IN ORDER to encourage Hawaiian parents to take good care of their children, and to assist in the growing of the people of this Archipelago, I do certify that I will pay

A PRIZE OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS

to each and every child born in Waikapu, Maui, after this day. These are the conditions of this Agreement. It is a child born in Waikapu proper, Continue reading

Na olelo ponoi o Kalani Kalakaua ma kona la hanau, 1874.

“Aloha oukou:

Ua lawe mai au i keia la, oia hoi kuu la hanau, i la hoomaikai i ka Mea Mana, no na pomaikai o ko kakou ola kino a kokoke i ka puni o keia makahiki. A ano ka mea hoi, ke kokoke mai nei ka manawa o Ko’u holo ana aku i na aina e, e imi i ka pomaikai o na hana nui a ko kakou aupuni; ua puili ae au i keia wa, e hai aku i Ko’u aloha ia oukou e na makaainana.

Ke hele nei au e hooko aku i ka mea a ke kau Ahaolelo i hooholo iho nei.

He mea mau iloko o na moolelo kahiko o na aupuni a me ko keia wa no hoi, ke kaahele ana o na Aimoku iloko o kekahi mau aupuni e aku, e imi ana no i pomaikai lahui iho. Continue reading

Eliza Haumea is born, 1921.

A NEW CHILD ARRIVES IN THIS WORLD.

On Friday last week, a plump new lady named Eliza arrived in this world of light from the loins of Mrs. David Bonabare Haumea [David Bonaparte Haumea]. She is a healthy child this day; and she makes ten children for Mr. Haumea and his second wife; two have passed on to the other world and eight remain living, and added together with the three living children with his wife [former wife?], and his many grandchildren, this is a family that is increasing the lahui.

Mr. Haumea is an officer stationed at the corner of Fort and Merchant streets, and is someone who has been employed as an officer for a very long time. Long live the child until she is of old age.

[Last year I posted an article with more on David Bonaparte Haumea and a picture to boot!]

(Kuokoa, 10/7/1921, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIX, Helu 40, Aoao 1. Okatoba 7, 1921.