Abduction!? 1877.

Boys were kidnapped.

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:–

I send off my bundle to you, having the right time to do so. For I see that you are one of the shooting stars of the nation of Hawaii, flying from where the sun rises to where the sun sets, shooting all the way here to North America.

The words placed above is what grows in my conscience. Might you be patient and accept the contents of my bundle. For I have seen you and how you have patience to accept what is sent to you. Its contents are here below:–

Five Hawaiian boys were abducted by the lumber transporting ships Atlanta and Victor. Three boys on the Atlanta; these are their names, Nakai, Kikau, and Kanahele. And aboard the Victor, two boys; these are their names, Keliikipi and Kaaoaouila. That is my baggage that I entrust to you, and it is for you to call out loudly to the parents of these boys, as they may be left feeling aloha for their children abducted by the Captains of these ships who break the law of the Nation of Hawaii and King Kalakaua. When these boys arrived here at Port Gamble, the Captains abandoned them. We believe that if there were no Hawaiians here, the boys’ health would have been danger, and they would have had no place to rest their heads.

The place they were hid was in a skiff that had its opening turned over atop the Forward House* of the sailors in the bow. That is where they hid when the ship carrying lumber left Honolulu, that is what they told us. These children are very little, perhaps ten or so years old; not fit to work at the lumber mills here in Puget Sound.

To the Parents–O Parents, watch your children closely, and do not let them wander about the docks, or go aboard the ships, and enjoy feasting on barrel meats, lest they be abducted by the ship Captains like these children. You have heard that Kalakaua’s is a “Lahui increasing nation” and there is a Hawaiian government law that forbids Hawaiians from going abroad unless their contract is approved by the governor of the island on which they live; only with the governor’s approval can they leave; also the Governor must command the ship Captain to care for and return the man or men that he takes away. And if the Captain or Captains do not return the man or men that they take away, then they will be fined $300 for each man. That is the law for the Captains who secretly take away Hawaiians.

To the Governors.–O Governors, do your job conscientiously, and so too your subordinates, be vigilant of your duties, search the trading ships of all types which leave Honolulu, for there are many Hawaiians who leave Honolulu and live abroad for long periods without it being known that they left, and they have been living here in these foreign lands for many years.

But here is my question pertaining to that. Who is at fault? The ship Captain perhaps? The children perhaps? In my opinion, it is the ship captain’s fault, if I am not mistaken. That is according to what the children told us when we questioned them, and they said that they were brought because of the desire of the captain that they come here. If that is true, it would be best if the captains return the boys to Honolulu when the ships go once again, or it would be better if they were tried so that it is made clear if the captains are at fault or if it is the children. As for the names of these ships, I do not know them [Atlanta and Victor??], but the agents of this company and some haole of Honolulu should know, should it be thought to ask about the two.

I have nothing more to talk about at this time, but I ask for your kindness, if I am wrong about this, excuse me, and if I am correct before you and them as well, then place it in your bureau of love, and it will be for you to spread it before the public so that our many friends will know, they who live from Kumukahi where the sun rises to Lehua where the sun sets.

To you goes my warm aloha, and to the type-setting boys of the Press goes my expression of aloha, and to your Editor goes my loving right-handed handshake.

G. W. E. Kawaiulaomaleka,
Puget Sound, Kitsap County, Sep. 28, 1877.

*Lana House. Not sure where this phrase comes from. I could not find it used in any other article. It was suggested by http://www.maritimehawaii.com that this likely refers to the Forward House.

(Kuokoa, 11/10/1877, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVI, Helu 45, Aoao 3. Novemaba 10, 1877.

Meaning behind a name, 1878.

[Found under: “NA NU HOU HAWAII.”]

Motivating the increase of the Lahui—July 16, 1878, at Mana, Kauai, a daughter was born to Kahoonei (m) and Kolailai (f). This girl was named Anna Harriet Kahuakaipaoa Kahoonei, in honor of the unsuccessful trip of the Hon. Joseph U. Kawainui and his fellow travellers, Mrs. Anna Kaulaokeahi, P. Costa, Miss Harriet L. Moore, Miss Ruth Mahoe, Miss Agnis Akanaka [Agnes Akanaka], Rev. J. H. Mahoe, and Simon Puniwai, who did not see the fire-brand cliffs of Kamaile.

J. P. Kanuikino.

{We admire this name, and hope that she will grow and become motivated to increase the Lahui, and that she will have many descendants after her. Editor}

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 7/27/1878, p. 2)

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke 1, Helu 30, Aoao 2. Iulai 27, 1878.

It is almost Mothers’ Day, and I just came across this article, so…, 1863.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Prizing the Lahui.—We have heard that the Honorable R. C. Wyllie is considering presenting medals to some women living on his lands at Hanalei; the reason for him doing so is because of the great number of children these women gave birth to, that being 15 children of one, and the same for the other; and a majority of the children survive. Continue reading

Birth of the new Alii, 1875.

The Hon. A. S. Cleghorn was blessed with being gifted with a beautiful daughter by his wife, the Alii Likelike Cleghorn. This is a new Royal Offspring in the era of King Kalakaua. Our humble plea is for the Heavens to watch over and bless Hawaii,

(Lahui Hawaii, 10/21/1875, p. 3)

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Okatoba 21, 1875.

Birth announcements, 1880.

Captain W. P. Kalolina was blessed with being presented with by his “Eve,” two boys on the 5th of this September. Those who bear fruit of their loins are fortunate for it is an expansion of the lahui [hooulu lahui] in this era of King Kalakaua. The names of these offsprings are Kealiipunikuhina and Keliialohamakaainana. Continue reading

J. H. Kanepuu speaks out about immigration and hooulu lahui, 1862.

Some Thoughts

FOR THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:

Some thoughts welled up within me pertaining to something printed by you on a page on the past 1st of March, Helu 14; about some matters dealing with increasing the people of our islands, if it is something appropriate to do. Continue reading

On population, 1873.

Population of the Hawaiian Archipelago.

In this issue, we put before as a free paper for our readers the population chart of these Hawaiian Islands for the year 1872. For those who understand the population chart, they will think that it is something valuable, but for those who think it has no value, we should probably cover the important aspects. Continue reading

W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

Hooulu lahui, 1872.

[Found under: “NA OLELO HOOLAHA.”]

TO HAWAIIAN PARENTS.

IN ORDER to encourage Hawaiian parents to take good care of their children, and to assist in the growing of the people of this Archipelago, I do certify that I will pay

A PRIZE OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS

to each and every child born in Waikapu, Maui, after this day. These are the conditions of this Agreement. It is a child born in Waikapu proper, Continue reading

Na olelo ponoi o Kalani Kalakaua ma kona la hanau, 1874.

“Aloha oukou:

Ua lawe mai au i keia la, oia hoi kuu la hanau, i la hoomaikai i ka Mea Mana, no na pomaikai o ko kakou ola kino a kokoke i ka puni o keia makahiki. A ano ka mea hoi, ke kokoke mai nei ka manawa o Ko’u holo ana aku i na aina e, e imi i ka pomaikai o na hana nui a ko kakou aupuni; ua puili ae au i keia wa, e hai aku i Ko’u aloha ia oukou e na makaainana.

Ke hele nei au e hooko aku i ka mea a ke kau Ahaolelo i hooholo iho nei.

He mea mau iloko o na moolelo kahiko o na aupuni a me ko keia wa no hoi, ke kaahele ana o na Aimoku iloko o kekahi mau aupuni e aku, e imi ana no i pomaikai lahui iho. Continue reading