W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

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Anybody ever see one of these blue ribbons or blue badges of the annexationists? 1893.

[Found under: “TOPICS OF THE DAY.”]

The appointment of Mr. Kauhi to be Sheriff for the District of Ewa is very characteristic of the Provisional Government. Because Mr. Kauhi has sported a blue annexation badge he has been considered fit by the Attorney General to hold the responsible position to which he has been appointed. The blue badge has evidently made Mr. Smith forget that the honest(!) and super—virtuous Legislature of 1888 expelled Mr. Kauhi who was the member from Ewa for being convicted of being a bribe taker—but perhaps bribe-taking is not considered a sin among the P. G. rulers and not considered a bad quality for a police officer. We now fully expect to see Mr. W. O. Smith pitchfork that other honest (?) Hawaiian Mr. J. W. Kalua into office—say as judge for Wailuku. “Birds of a feather flock together” seems to be a true proverb as far as our missionary government is concerned.

[In the article, “BLOUNT AT HAWAII” printed on the front page of the Chicago Daily Tribune on 4/6/1893, mentioned is a dark-blue ribbon with the words ANNEXATION CLUB being worn by the members of said club to present themselves to James Blount.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/10/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 8, Page 2. January 10, 1893.

Well before John L. Stevens aids in the overthrow of the Kingdom, look at what is printed in his own newspaper in Maine! 1892.

AMERICA’S OPPORTUNITY IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN.

Shall the Key to the Pacific Ocean Pass Into British Hands?

[From the Daily Kennebec Journal.]

It is an accepted truism that nations, as well as individuals, have their opportunities and duties, and that the neglect of them, through indolence or cowardice, surely brings retribution in one form or another.

The States and Territories which outlet on the vast Western ocean will some day have a population of one hundred and fifty millions of souls. This Pacific side of the American republic, stretching from north Alaska to south California, a coast line of four thousand miles, without including the seventeen hundred miles of shore line of Puget Sound, is to have a development of agricultural, lumber, fisheries, and mineral riches, out of which will flow streams of  commerce, which neither the imagination nor cold figures can well cover at the present time.

In the front of these vast Pacific States extends the immense ocean of the Pacific. Across this vast Pacific plain must be for all time the water roads along which will move the commerce of many hundreds of millions of people. Anchored firmly between the two great oceans, America divides with Europe the commerce of the Atlantic, Europe having the advantage by numbers, position, and prestige. But on the great Western ocean America can easily take the lead and hold it securely against all competitors. To do this she must improve her opportunities. Sloth and cowardice never win anything worth having. Time waits neither for individuals nor nations. Success is for those who dare. Continue reading

John L. Stevens represents Hawaii in America, 1893.

STEVENS AND HAWAII.

The Ex-Minister Points Out the Advantage of Annexation.

AMERICAN INTEREST LEAD

An Address Before San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, Which Passes Resolution Favoring Annexation.

San Francisco, June 1.—Hon. John L. Stevens, ex-United States minister at Hawaii, addressed the Chamber of Commerce of this city to-day on the subject of “Hawaiian Affairs and Their Relation to the Interest of the United States.” A large number of businessmen were present and gave the speaker an appreciative reception. At the close of the address a resolution was adopted favoring the speedy annexation of the islands. Mr. Stevens, in relating his first impressions upon the islands, said he had not been long in Honolulu before he perceived how thoroughly an American city it was and how predominating were all American interests on the islands. Continuing he said:

He had found an intelligent body of citizens of American and European origin supporting a semi-barbaric monarchy, dead in everything but its vices; coarsely luxuriant in its tastes and wishes and spreading social and political demoralization througout the island.

The speaker then related several incidents in the career of the deposed queen, and charges her not only with personal immorality, but also with having by unconstitutional and arbitrary methods, secured the adoption of certain measures, such as the opium and lottery bills, and recited her attempt to promulgate a new constitution, which finally aroused the respectable element of the community to action. Mr. Stevens then reviewed in detail the circumstances of the revolution and overthrow of the queen last January, and the subsequent establishment of the provisional government. He spoke of the danger of riot and incendiarism at the time of the revolution, the fact that there was no adequate police power in Honolulu, and that an appeal was accordingly made for the landing of men from the United States ship Boston. In this connection, Mr. Stevens said in part:

Under the diplomatic and naval rules, the United States minister and naval commander would have shamefully ignored their duty had they not landed men from the Boston for the security of American life and property and the maintenance of public order, even had the committee of public safety not requested the United States to do so. The Boston’s men stepped not an inch from the line of duty; they never lifted a finger in aid of the fallen monarchy on the rising of the provisional government and all assertions to the contrary, by whomsoever uttered, are audacious falsehoods.

Continue reading

Be vigilant. Just because someone claims to represent you, does that necessarily mean it is so? 1893 / timeless.

HOW IS IT POSSIBLE?

Yes, how can Stevens [John L. Stevens] make himself so brazen and say that his appearance, his voice, and his words—that they represent the Hawaiian people, all the while that that Stevens is in the United States? This is something that is appalling to us, but there are many things that will shock someone, and at times we just want to suppress that feeling, but we cannot, because of how blatant the examples. However, while we may be in shock, the shock of Thurston and his group will greatly surpass this, when they realize that they  met up with the spirit of the waters of Eleile that turn back ti leaves,* and they will realize that the sentiment of the Americans will turn back as well when they hear the truth.

[Many times people don’t pay attention to what is happening outside their own community because they have a job to do, or they have children to care for, or this, or that. Let us be vigilant during these upcoming years. The future generations deserve our attention.]

* See Mary Kawena Pukui’s ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Saying, #1649 about the current in the pool of Eleile which turns back stalks of ti leaves thrown into it by visitors.

(Hawaii Holomua, 2/15/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 160, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1893.

Mele for the Claudine, the vessel that carried the commission of annexationists to Washington DC, 1893.

KELAUDINA SONG.

Kaulana mai nei Kelaudina
Ahailono o ka poe pakaha
Nau i lawe aku na komisina
O ke aupuni kuloko o Hawaii
Hopuhopualulu e ka hele’na
A na elele o ua aupuni nei
E ake ana e hookoia
Ka iini pakaha aina
Halawai aku nei lakou
Me kahi paele a Kalivilana Continue reading