Terrorism even here? 1926.

KNIFE USED AS NAIL TO AFFIX NOTE ON DOOR

The Ku Klux Klan Association is here in this town according to Maurice Rey, the owner of a hair salon on Emma Street. According to the claim of Rey before Detective Kellett, this past Saturday, he found a warning of troubles that would be carried out upon him, and for that reason he wanted to be put under the protection of the police force, and he also asked that he be protected from wrongdoings by a group of degenerates seen often in his area.

When he went to his place of work in the morning of this past Saturday, the first thing his eyes saw was a note on the door affixed by a knife painted red, the paint still fresh on the knife. These are the words written on the note. “Mr. Freitchie, Do not let the sun set upon you in this town. BEWARE, K. K. K.”

The police department is in charge of being vigilant against this type of terroristic activity, and they will try to search out and arrest the Imperial Wizard of the Klan living here in this town.

[Stand up against cowardly acts of bullying and terrorism.]

(Kuokoa, 11/18/1926, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXV, Helu 46, Aoao 2. Novemaba 18, 1926.

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Arrests being made for disturbing the peace? 1892.

“HOOKAHI NO HAWAE LAUHUE KONA.”*

This past Friday, the Government began arresting people thought to be taking part in activities that go against the good and the peace of the Nation, and these are the names that we obtained. The Hon. Wilcox, the Hon. J. W. Bipikane, Mr. V. V. Ashford, and many others.

*An olelo noeau speaking to the wide-reaching power of a single entity.

(Hawaii Holomua, 5/21/1892, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke II, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 21, 1892.

Death of Kauhane, 1900.

THAT FAMILIAR ONE OF THE TOWN HAS PASSED ON.

At the Hospital was where the life of Kauhane left, one of the Hawaiians that was very familiar amongst the different ethnicities of this town. And this caused his friends around town to be overcome; he was a man that was very familiar as a sounder of the police whistle and an officer on street corners. And as a result of those positions, he had very many friends from the haole to the Hawaiians.

He was one of the Hawaiian boys who stepped foot on the Artic [Alika] in his youth, and he became a kamaaina of those foreign lands.

He was a Hawaiian who was greatly admired while he was travelled the seas¹ as a sailor until he became a Captain for one of the schooners of our seas. And he was one of the diligent servants…

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Officer David Bonaparte Haumea through the years, 1922–1929.

These are awesome not only for the descendants of David Bonaparte Haumea, but it is interesting to see the changing police uniforms!

1922

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 4, Aoao 6. Ianuari 27, 1922.

1923

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXII, Helu 45, Aoao 4. Novemaba 8, 1923.

1927

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 15, Aoao 6. Aperila 21, 1927.

1929

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Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 2, Aoao 8. Mei 9, 1929.

Duke H. Kahanamoku, father of the world-famous Duke P. Kahanamoku, passes on, 1917.

DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU LEAVES THIS LIFE BEHIND.

Thursday last week, Duke K. Kahanamoku [Duke H. Kahanamoku] grew weary of this worldly life, the father of the swimming champion of Hawaii nei, at his home at 1847 Ala Moana Road, Waikiki.

On that day mentioned, Kahanamoku went swimming at the ocean that afternoon for his health, and upon his return, he lay to rest before dinner, saying that he was feeling dizzy; and a few minutes thereafter, his life breath left him and he went to where all must go. It is said that the cause of his death was heart disease.

Duke K. Kahanamoku was born in this town on the 21st of July, 1869, and so he made 48 years old on this past 21st of July. The reason Kahanamoku was named “Duke” is because he was born on the day that the Duke of Edinburgh arrived in Honolulu nei, on that very year and day.

Duke K. Kahanamoku, who died, was employed in the police department here in Honolulu nei under William P. Jarrett as a bicycle officer, recorder of offenses, and sergeant, until he became police captain for an entire watch, and for some unknown reason, Kahanamoku left the police force and began to work once more with William P. Jarret at Kawa as a prison guard.

Duke K. Kahanamoku left behind a wife and six sons and three daughters grieving for him on this side of the dark river [muliwai eleele].

From Ke Aloha Aina, we join the family who are saddened for your loved one, but God will lighten all your burdens, for it is He who creates and He who takes away. It is His will that be done, not that of the children of man.

(Aloha Aina, 8/10/1917, p. 1)

HAALELE MAI O DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 32, Aoao 1. Augate 10, 1917.

Duke runs for reelection as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu, 1936.

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

Kahanamoku, scion of one of the few remaining full-blooded Hawaiian families in the islands, was responsible for returning the sheriff’s office, for the first 25 years of city and county government always held by a Democrat, to the Democratic fold after it had lapsed momentarily into the hands of the Republicans with results that are too well known and too well remembered by every resident of Hawaii to repeat here.

Perhaps the most famous living exponent of the Hawaiian race is Duke P. Kahanamoku, who first spread the name of the Territory over the newspapers and magazines of the world by his swimming prowess and is now seeking re-election as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu on the Democratic ticket.

For Sheriff

DUKE P. KAHANAMOKU

The Duke first took the world by storm when, and absolutely unknown, he went to the quadrennial Olympic games as one of the American team and made a clean sweep of all the swimming events in which he was entered, establishing several world’s records that stood for many years. He repeated this performance in the following Olympic games and ruled supreme in acquatic affairs until his voluntary retirement from active competition.

On his return to Hawaii the gratitude of the citizens of the Territory was expressed in the form of a public fund which was used to provide a residence for the Kahanamoku family.

The Duke declares in his speeches that he carries on the duties of sheriff of the city and county in the clean and sportsmanlike manner which distinguished his athletic career.

Despite inadequate appropriations provided for the greatly needed new construction at the city and county jail, which is under the jurisdiction of the sheriff’s office, Kahanamoku has established an efficient record in the conduct of this institution—a record on which he is asking renomination at re-election.

“I am a man of few words,” the Duke declares. “When I was representing Hawaii against the best swimmers in the world, I never predicted that I would win any particular race—but I think I won my share. It is the same with the present race for the sheriff’s office.”

[Duke seems to have followed in the footsteps of his father. Duke P. Kahanamoku’s father, Duke K. Kahanamoku served in various positions in the police department, ultimately reaching the rank of captain.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 9/24/1936, p. 1)

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

The Hawaii Democrat, Volume 9, Number 24, Page 1. September 24, 1936.

David Bonaparte Haumea, 1922.

DAVID BONAPARTE HAUMEA.

This is the tall and husky officer and fisherman and handsome youth who directs and brings order to traffic at Fort and Merchant streets. He has a great many friends, and no enemies, and he has one of the biggest families in Honolulu, and is ——- years old today.

(Kuokoa, 1/27/1922, p. 6)

DAVID BONAPARTE HAUMEA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 4, Aoao 6. Ianuari 27, 1922.