Commentary on annexation from a hundred and fifty years ago. 1869.

A few Independent Thoughts on Annexation.

To the Editor—Sir:—As the laws of debate require, and your liberal principles allow each side to be heard, I submit the following lines to the public.

In all speculative propositions, it is necessary to examine their basis, that a predisposing bias may not violate truth. Continue reading

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Kealakaa persecuted, 1876.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Kahuna man clothed in a holoku.—This past Thursday, Kealakaa, a student from Lahainaluna, possessed by an evil spirit, practicing medicine in the uplands of Nuuanu without a license, was arrested. Continue reading

Chinese New Years, 1868.

Happy New Year Day of the Chinese.

Today, the 25th of January, will be celebrated by all the Chinese, as the first day of their new year.

Sometimes the first day of their new year begins in January, and sometimes in February, because the way they reckon their years is by the orbiting of the moon, and therefore, some years they have twelve months, and some years they have thirteen; and the years they have thirteen months, is a bit like our reckoning.

We  are told that in the towns of their Land, on the day before the new moon of their new year, there is a great procession on the streets and at the Eastern Gates, where the Sun rises, for their towns are secured by tall stone walls. Where the people gather outside of the wall, they build an altar and upon it they place offerings, candles, and wine [?? waina]—the Leader of the Procession kneels three times, and knocks his head nine times, along with other religious practices of theirs; that is their celebration of new year.

What they do every new year is broken down into five parts below:

Offerings to the Sun and the Earth—the worshiping of family gods—the worshiping of those who died and the ancestors—bowing before their living parents and other elders, and celebrating because of the new year.

Adults, when they visit their friends, they are given tea to drink and watermelon seeds to eat. The Chinese do not eat meat on the first day of the year, and eat food that grows from the land that beautifies the heavens and earth. And the poor, when they enter houses and give their greetings, they ask for sweets or other food. They close their Shops for some days in their own Lands. When the Chinese go to foreign Lands, the poor continue to perform the work of their parents, and they certainly never go without honoring the new year.

Amongst us here in Hawaii nei, there are many of those people, and it is their holiday. This is a lahui that does not worship Jehovah, the one true God, but they have many gods; they burn a lot of paper to them, which is the scent which carries their prayers.

Those Chinese are numerous who live amongst us, they are in many classes.

We hope that these Chinese soon understand the truth, by learning and believing in the Christian People, and they will stand equally as fine kamaaina amongst us, and not help those who follow the ways of their land.

Happy new year to you, and have a good new year.

[This year, the year of the dog begins on 2/16 (Friday). Let’s hope that that is the beginning of a good year!]

(Kuokoa, 1/25/1868, p. 3)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 4, Aoao 3. Ianuari 25, 1868.

Keep politics off of the pulpit, 1894.

THE DOORS OF WAINEE CHURCH ARE SHUT.

When the steamer Iwalani arrived on the morning of this past Friday, news of the Paupili rain of Lele [Lahaina] was heard, saying that the doors of Wainee Church were shut by the brethren. The story we heard was this below.

One day on the previous week, in the sermon of the kahu of that Church, A. Pali, he spoke about God, and at the very end of his talk, he revealed this:

“I am a true American, inside and out, from top to bottom;” and other inappropriate words; and the congregation began to fidget, and at the close of his prayer, the brethren told him, you are not good, O Pali, and we tell you that you will not pray in this Church from now forward.” Continue reading

Lorenzo Lyons preached, “Never be a double-faced traitor,” 1894.

TOPICS OF THE DAY.

We made a suggestion yesterday for the benefit of the Advertiser in regard to a new version of Hawaii Ponoi as desired by the churchly morning paper. An esteemed contemporary sends us a song composed by the late venerable Father Lyons of Waimea, Hawaii, which he thinks would be fitting to be used as a National Anthem and sung every Sunday at the Central Union Church by the descendants of the true missionaries, as of great benefit for then present and future spiritual welfare. If “Professor” Lyons instead of Sec’y Taylor will “presided” at the organ the effect would be magnificent indeed. This is what good Father Lyons taught the Hawaiians to sing:

Paa mau kuu manao aloha
Paa mau, paa mau,
Paa mau, kuu manao aloha
I kuu aina hanau e!

CHORUS:

Aole au e kipi
No No No, No No, No,
Aole au e kipi, kumakaia
He aloha aina mau.

For the benefit of those of the members of the Central Union who lately have “forgotten” the Hawaiian language we present a free translation:

Everlasting my love shall be
Steadfast ever, steadfast ever
Everlasting my love shall be
To my own, my native land.

CHORUS:

I will never be a traitor
No no no, no no, no
Never be a doublefaced traitor
My love shall ever be true.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/10/1894, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 8, Page 2. January 10, 1894.