Praying with patience, 1893.

ON BENDED KNEE.

During these days of turmoil of thought and perplexity of life, we have but one sanctuary that we remind our fellow citizens of, where they can receive solace and put an end to the burdens of sadness and grief, Continue reading

Mail delivery in Kona, 1869.

Pertaining to the Letter Carriers in Kona.

I have great praise for the work of the Letter Carriers from Kealakekua to  Waiohinu; great as well is my praise for the vigilance of the people of South Kona in regard to their Letters and Newspapers. At each group of houses [kauhale] all the way to Manuka, there is a Mail Box on the side of the rode, and it is there that the Letters that the kamaaina want to send are left, and it is there too that Letter Carrier leaves the Letters and Newspapers for that place. There are perhaps twenty Mail Boxes on that road. This is as per the decree of the Postmaster General [Luna Leta Nui], to carry the Letter Bag partially empty, delivering and picking up at each group of houses. This happened within this year in South Kona. But in North Kona, this is not happening, and perhaps in other places as well. Continue reading

Disclaimer and the power of the missionaries and the church, 1869.

A disclaimer:

Mamuli o ke kono ana mai a ka lehulehu e hoopuka i Kaao a moolelo Hawaii a haole ma ko kakou nupepa, a no ka mea hoi, no ka lehulehu ka nupepa, nolaila, ua ae aku makou e hoopukaia ke Kaao Hawaii malalo iho nei. Aka, ke noi nei makou, o na olelo maalea a me na olelo hoomanamana o ka wa kahiko, aole no ia he mea na kakou e manaoio aku ai; he hoike ana ia i ke ano hupo loa o ko kakou lahui i kela wa. O na hewa a me na olelo pelapela, e kapae loa aku ka haku Kaao ia mea mai kona kakau ana mai. Continue reading

Committee of Thirteen and the Calvinists, 1893.

NATION OVERTHROWING COMMITTEE OF MISSIONARIES.

What are the each of the Names of this Nation Overthrowing Committee of Missionaries?

There will come a time when each of their names are made known.

What are the thoughts and aims of this Missionary Committee? Continue reading

Defense of Bishop Alfred Willis, and perhaps why Royalist Campbell was baptized at St. Andrews and not at Kawaiahao. 1893.

POSITION OF THE BISHOP.

Bishop Willis in his Diocesan Church Magazine takes the ground that Christian missions to heathen nations and peoples throughout the world will be injured by the news that will go everywhere of the prominent part taken by the sons and descendants of Christian missionaries in  Hawaii in overthrowing the ancient monarchy of the country. Whether the Bishop can maintain this ground or not is not a question that we are going to discuss. Continue reading

Speaking of Bishop Willis, 1893.

AN IMPLACABLE BISHOP.

The Diocesan Magazine is a purely religious publication—not like the Christian Union in New York, or our own Friend, partially secular in its character. It is, therefore, with some surprise, that one finds half the March issue given over to a rabid attack on the Government, the Revolution, and indeed upon almost everything civilized, progressive and Christian in sight. Those who are acquainted with the career of the present head of the Anglican Church in Hawaii, will find nothing unexpected in his sentiments, but will be surprised only at the manner and occasion of their expression. Continue reading

Blind no more, 1894.

THE TIME IS OVER WHEN HAWAIIAN PEOPLE ARE BLINDED.

In 1820, the missionaries came to Hawaii nei and taught the good of God and they instructed—do not accumulate wealth on earth or it will be destroyed by bugs and by rot, but instead accumulate your wealth in heaven, where thieves cannot steal it; therefore, look to the heavens, there is God.

It is a true, this lahui heeded the teachings of the missionaries from Boston, and their voices became something important to this lahui for 66 years without dissent. Continue reading