Pule should be studied as well, 1891.

[Prayer of Kana found in: “He Moolelo Kaao no Kana: Ke Ahi Kanana, Ka Hiapaiole, Ka Moopuna a Uli, Ka Mea Nana i Hoohiolo o Haupukele ka Puu Kaua i Molokai.”]

Ua meha ka leo o  ka ale o ka moana
Ua mea ka leo o ke kai
Ua meha ka leo o ke kanaka
Ua meha ka leo o ka manu noio o ke kai
Ua meha ka leo o ka Aama kua lenalena o ka pali
Ua meha ka leo o ka Opihi makaiauli
Ua meha ka leo o ka Hee pali
Ua meha ka leo o ka Amakihi holo kahakai Continue reading


More on Kahuku connection to Waipahu, 1939.


Editor The Advertiser:

May I add a little to Lahilahi Webb’s story of Waipahu.

On Tuesday Miss Titcomb took Lahilahi Webb and me to interview Mrs. Kapeka Baker, one of the two remaining old timers of that locality. Continue reading

Lahilahi Webb on Kahuku connection to Waipahu, 1939.


Editor The Advertiser:

In the Advertiser this morning, May 16, I saw the article “Underground Channel May connect Kahuku and Waipahu.” I have heard about this water of Waipahu coming from Kahuku, frommy childhood. My mother’s people were kamaainas of Waikele and the Ewa district. Also my granduncle, Kapepu Kauila, familiarly known as Kapepu, the Konohiki nui of Waikele and Waianae. Continue reading

Kahuku connected to Waipahu by underground channel, 1939.

Underground Channel May Connect Kahuku, Waipahu


Are there underground channels from one side of the Island to the other?

Is there, Kamaainas of Waipahu, a stream which begins as Punahoolapa—the “Bright Spring”—in Kahuku, disappears and worms its way underground across the Island to reappear in your own Waipahu spring? Continue reading

Not just February, 1938, Today, Tomorrow.

Need to Care For

A petition was put before the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] of Maui on this past Monday, May 15, and it was about the obvious truth of the sad acknowledgement by the kamaaina of Hawaii, about the quiet decline of the Hawaiian language.

This document was sent from Molokai, one of the bastions of the old Hawaiians, and the document was written in the Hawaiian language, and it is something important taken and considered by the members of the board, the press, and others who went to observe the meeting. Continue reading

Joseph U. Kawainui announces intent to publish a new paper run by Hawaiians, 1877.


Pride of the Hawaiians.

As a result of the great desire of the people that a new Hawaiian newspaper be published under the management of a Hawaiian, therefore, I agree, and the Issue I of that new paper will be printed on Thursday, the 3rd of January, 1878, and thereafter, every Saturday.

It will be as large as the “Kuokoa,” and the cost for the year will be Two Dollars up front, or One Dollar for Six Months paid in advance.

I will exert myself along with skilled Hawaiians to make this new newspaper a newspaper that Hawaiians can be educated in the pressing issues of the day, Continue reading

How bad leaders and their advisers were dealt with in Kaʻū, 1890.


Before Kamehameha the First had reduced the island of Hawaii to his subjection the various districts were ruled over by petty kings or high chiefs. Anecdotes of three of these aliis who successively ruled over the large district of Kau, are still current among the natives. They are not mythical, but actual events.

Koihala the alii of Kau was about making a voyage from Kona to Kau in his fleet of canoes. He sent word to his people of Kau to meet him with supplies of food on a certain day at Kapua.

The people cooked hogs, dogs and potatoes and prepared poi, water in calabashes and other supplies in sufficient quantities for the chief and his retainers, and started afoot with their burdens to meet him. On arriving at Kapua the fleet came along but did not stop. The alii called to the people ashore to go back to the next landing towards South Point. They resumed their burdens and retraced their steps to this place, the king proceeding by sea. At this place they were told to go on still further to another landing. This was repeated several times and they were finally told to climb the steep pali and meet the king at Kaalualu around and east of South Point. The people were tired, foot sore and hungry from their wearisome travel over the lava and determined upon a different reception to their alii from what he expected. They said “we will teach these chiefs a lesson not to wear us out with their capricious whims. We are hungry and we will eat the food and give him another article of diet instead.” So they sat down and ate up the food and filled the ti-leaf containers with stones and proceeded to near the coast and sat on a slight hill to await the coming of the chief and his party. He landed and proceeded up the ascent to receive his hookupu (tribute of food). When near, the people stood up and, taking the stones from the containers, threw them at the king and his retainers saying, “Here is your pig,” “Here is your dog,” “Here are your potatoes,” etc., and Koihala was killed. The stone, a short way on the road from Kaalualu to Waiohinu is still pointed out as the exact spot where Koihala—the exacting tyrant—met his death. Continue reading