Winds and rains of Hana, Maui, 1877.

[Found under: “No Hana me ko laila noho ana.”]

The winds.—There are two places where the wind constantly blows, from the ocean, and from the land. There are two names of the winds from the ocean, the Koholapehu and the Koholalele. The Koholapehu is the rainy wind from the ocean; and the Koholalele is the calm wind from the ocean that has no rain, it is a rain that fans the clouds allowing you to clearly see the sheer cliffs of Hawaii. The Lauawa is the cold wind upland of the land which blows softly atop Kaihuakala and comes lovingly together with the waves of Keanini; that is the wind that carries the sweet fragrance of the pandanus of Kahalaowaka, having it intermingle with the waters of Punahoa. Continue reading

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Names of the channels between the islands, 1909.

[Found under: “NA MEA ANO NUI O KE AO NEI: NA KAI ME NA KOWA AME NA KAIKUONO AME NA PUALI.”]

The places where the ocean [moana] meet with the land, and nearly surround the land, or are on the sides of lands, they are called seas [kai], like the Caribbean Sea [kai Karibiana], Black Sea [kai Eleele], White Sea [kai Keokeo], Mediterranean Sea [kai Waenahonua], Red Sea [kai Ula]. Along with the sea of Alenuihaha between Hawaii and Maui, Continue reading

Church and weather news from Halawa, Molokai, 1866.

From Halawa, Molokai.

Our Church is no longer lacking for a church building at this time. The works of the Lord Jesus Christ is strengthening amongst the brethren. It is fine associating with them. Opened up once again are the Churches from Halawa to Wailua, and in the future perhaps too at Pelekunu. These days have been days of strong wind, maybe the lid of “Laamaomao” has been opened by that Kuapakaa.

S. W. Nueku.

Dec. 20, 1865.

(Kuokoa, 1/13/1866, p. 4)

Kuokoa_12_13_1866_4.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 2, Aoao 4. Ianuari 13, 1866.

 

Hawaiian translation of A. F. Grant’s “Loyal Ned on the last cruise of the Alabama,” 1888.

NED NIXON

the

Steel-Hearted and the Unforgettable Executor of Orders;

and the

The Final Siege

of the

“ALABAMA,”

the

Fierce Fighter and Fire Breather of the Atlantic Ocean.

“There are two wondrous ones of the sea,
Feared by the Whalers;
The Alabama and the Shenandoah,
Chasing in the distance.” Continue reading

Heroes, 1966.

These four boys rescued two youths from drowning in California a week ago. They are from left, Robert L. Kuhaulua, George K. Kupihe, Melvin D. Kalahiki and Robert K. Brown.—Photo by Pan American.

Isle job corpsmen save two from drowning on W. Coast

The rescue of two Santa Rosa, California, youths from drowning at Salmon Creek Beach a week ago today was told by four returning job corpsmen yesterday.

The corpsmen, who returned with 11 others from California on a Pan American plane, were Robert L. Kuhaulua, George K. Kupihe, Melvin D. Kalahiki and Robert K. Brown. Continue reading

Faith, 1893.

THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

The Hawaiian people have faith in the righteousness and the justice of the Americans; therefore they have great trust that Minister Willis will come and make right the outrageous offense that Minister Stevens and Captain Wiltse committed against this upright peoples. Therefore the Americans will dispense justice for Hawaii in 1893 just as Great Britain did too in 1843. Continue reading

More on Katsu Goto, 1889.

THAT MURDER AT HAMAKUA.

The body of the Japanese doctor* Goto at Hamakua was found dangling, killed by unknown people; news was received this week that three haole sugar plantation workers suspects were arrested, and they are being brought from Laupahoehoe aboard the Kinau to be detained at the Hilo jail.

Their names are T. G. Steel [T. G. Steele], J. Richmond and W. C. Blabon.

By the kindness of Mr. J. Kaulahea, we received the letter below from one of his friends in Honokaa:

The news of Honokaa nei is that a Hawaiian and haole are being arrested, suspected that they beat and hung the Japanese from the telephone pole.

These are who were arrested and taken to Hilo: 1 Hawaiian and 3 haole. However the arrests amongst the haole are not over. Continue reading