C. R. Bishop gifts Molokai lands to the Kamehameha Schools, 1893.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

Mr. C. R. Bishop has made a gift of his whole Molokai property to the Kamehameha Schools, founded by the will of his lamented wife, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Continue reading

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Birthday of Pauahi Lani, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of the Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who have passed on, the alii Pauahi is one who will always live in the memories of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth, and before her passing, she left most of it for the establishment of the School for the descendants of her people. Her fervent desire was for her lahui to be educated in English and knowledge necessary to  move them forward. Today there are hundreds who have been blessed by the knowledge gained from the schools. She has gone, but has left an unforgettable memorial which stands on her lands.

The chief Lunalilo has blessed the oldsters of his land; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing her people, and Pauahi educates those offspring. Those are the chiefs who left unforgettable monuments, and their names will forever more echo upon the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

Kuokoa_12_20_1901_2.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.

Our Museum, continued, 1900.

OUR MUSEUM

The Bishop Collection of Curios.

One of the Most Interesting Sights In Honolulu Pleasantly Described.

(Concluded.)

Death seems to have played an important part in the ancient regime, as the kings and chiefs had the power of life and death over their subjects. Then too, the priesthood, or kahunas, exercised what is termed the “tabu,” which prescribed certain rules and regulations for the natives, any violation of which was punishable by death; for instance a chief placed “tabu” sticks at the entrance to his hut; that meant to one and all, “Do not enter or pass within the shadow of the tabu sticks under pain of death;” if a Hawaiian subject, and even a petty chief, violated this tabu, he was instantly put to death; supplication was of no avail. The power of the kahunas in their exercise of the tabu, was so great and the superstitious awe of the common native so intense, that its effects have not died out even in this day and age. The common natives are yet prone to believe in their kahunas, and believe that they have the power to pray them to death; in olden days, if an enemy obtained any part of the body of another, a hair, a part of the finger nail, spittle, or anything of the body itself, he would give it to a kahuna and ask him to pray the other one to death; with great ceremony the kahuna would perform certain mysterious functions over the hair, say strange words, offer it before the poison god, and then announce that he was praying the native to death; this being told to the native so great his superstitious fear, he would go to his hut and in reality become sick over the thought of the dread summons made by the kahuna, and in many cases they actually died of the fright thus given them; and to this day many of the natives place more faith in their kahunas than in the “haole” or foreign physicians. If the praying did not perform the evil work, then a piece of the poison god was steeped and the fluid given the sufferer, it is said, which, acting upon his heart, killed him. On every hand in the museum are the evidences of kahunaism and death. There are stones, peculiarly shaped, (like a gourd,) with a small neck; these stones were suspended from the low door of a grass house in such a way that the person entering after the trap was set, would probably be crushed by the fall of the stone. They are made from lava rock. Continue reading

Still Our Museum Today! 1900.

OUR MUSEUM

The Bishop Collection of Curios.

One of the Most Interesting Sights In Honolulu Pleasantly Described.

HONOLULU, Feb. 8.—Above the inner entrance to the Museum of Hawaiian and Polynesian History is a tablet of polished mottled stone, in which is engraved in letters of gold the following inscription:

To the Memory of
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP,
FOUNDER OF THE KAMEHA-
MEHA SCHOOLS OF HO-
NOLULU.
A Bright Light Among Her Peo-
ple; Her Usefulness Survives
Her Earthly Life.

A Bernice Pauahi, she was related to the royal family of the Kamehameha dynasty, and the cousin of Queen Emma, two women who have indelibly inscribed their names upon the hearts of…

BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP.

…all Hawaiians, whether by birth of association. She married the Hon. C. R. Bishop, and with her immense wealth and her kindly deeds through life, created a new life among the Hawaiians. Upon her death she left most of her wealth to endow the Kamehameha Schools, a separate school for boys and a separate one for girls. These schools are kept up entirely from the income of her estates, which have become so vast as to render it necessary to erect other buildings throughout the Islands in order to expend the revenue. In memory of his wife, the Hon. C. R. Bishop dedicated the museum in her name, laying aside a princely endowment. Collectors have scoured the Hawaiian Islands for curios of historical and intrinsic value and have succeeded by the most diligent effort and at great expense, in depositing in the museum an invaluable collection of ancient materials which would warm the cockles of the antiquarian’s heart beyond measure. Calabashes, large and small, ancient and modern, have come into the museum; some were in the possession of families, relics passed from one generation to another; others were found in the caves where in ancient times were buried kings and chiefs. Idols of grotesque shapes, dedicated to all the elements of nature, good and evil; some dedicated to Pele, the Goddess of Volcanoes; others to the poison god and to the fish god; some made of stone, others of the valuable koa and kou woods; one made of the trunk of the poison tree, its wood, upon being steeped in water, being a most powerful, yet undetectable poison which acts upon the heart, and which was used by the kahunas and chiefs. Beautiful feather cloaks of wonderful sheen and delicate texture, worn by Kamehameha the Great during his tour of conquest a century ago. Continue reading

The death of Kaoleioku Pauli, 1874.

O PAULI, ALOHA

This past Tuesday, the 30th of December, at 7 o’clock in the evening, Kaoleioku Pauli left this earthly body and silently went on to the hidden pathway of Kanaloa; to return to the slumber of Niolopua, the eternal rest.

He was a man who was often seen in the royal courts of Hawaii nei, and he was a chief born of the land as shown in the genealogy chart below:

Keawe (m) dwelt with Lonomaaikanaka (f), begot was Kalaninuiiamamao (m); Kalaninuiiamamao (m) dwelt with Kamakaimoku, begot was Kalaniopuu (m); Kalaniopuu (m) dwelt with Ahia (f), begot was Kekuehoa (f); Kekuehoa dwelt with Kamahinakauloa (m), begot was Kaiakuilani (f); Kaiakauilani dwelt with Puumahiole (m), begot was Haumea (m); Haumea dwelt with Paaluhi (f), begot was Pauli; and he married Wakeki, but they have no offsrping. But it is sad that it was revealed that his wife is now pregnant with child, and perhaps the blood of Pauli will be begotten anew, and the name Kaoleioku Pauli will be given.

Pauli was born at Keauhou, in North Kona, Hawaii, on the 22nd of November 1836, and therefore he reached 37 years old and 1 month and 7 days.

He began playing the band during the time it was lead by William Merseburgh [?? Uilama Olelo-e], and he was the only student left from the band of the Kings, from Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III to Lunalilo, and while in that occupation, he fell. He was a man that was skilled at singing, and he was the greatest of Hawaiians in his deep knowledge of singing; and he greatly assisted in leading the choir of Kawaiahao; and he was always seen in front of song concerts with the alii Pauahi and Kamakaeha.

He was assigned by the Board of Education as a singing teacher for the government school for the district of Kona, Honolulu, and while in that position he let go of his burdens.

Pau ka lohe ana i kana ohe,
Ke kani kapalili mai i Iolani,
Pau ka lohe’a ana o kona leo,
Ma na paia eehia o Kawaiahao,
E na keiki kula, ua hele ke kumu,
Ua hele ka makua nana e ao mai,
Ma na anuu leo o na leo mele,
E Pauli e, aloha, aloha pau ole!
Imia ou mau kupuna alii,
Aia ia i ka lewanuu i ka lewa lani,
Aia ma ke ala polikua a Kane,
Imiia a loaa ou mau kini,
I hookahi ka noho’na i ka hale anuanu.

[No more will we hear wind instrument,
Its trilling song from Iolani,
No more will his voice be heard,
In the solemn walls of Kawaiahao,
O Schoolchildren, your teacher has gone,
Went is the father who taught,
The intervals in singing,
O Pauli, aloha, our never-ending aloha!
Seek out your chiefly ancestors,
They are in the sky up above, the sky in the heaven,
On the dark path of Kane,
Search out and find your relatives,
You will live as one in the cold house.

This is not the Pauli Kaoleioku who was the son of Kamehameha I and Kanekapolei.]

(Nuhou, 1/6/1874, p. 6)

Nuhou_1_6_1874_6

Ka Nuhou Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 10, Aoao 6. Ianuari 6, 1874.

The beginnings of Kamehameha Schools, 1884.

Kamehameha School.

By way of the kind and generous endowment given by the Hon. Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop, she did not forget to make contributions for Schools. Amongst the heirs shown in one of our papers published earlier, she gave a sum of money to build a new schoolhouse for children with no parents or who are indigent, and the name of the school is to be Kamehameha. By this great kindness extended to help in the education of orphan and indigent children, several familiar friends of this town were recently selected as trustees and administrators pertaining to the establishing of said school, that being Charles R. Bishop, S. M. Damon, C. M. Hyde, C. M. Cooke, and W. O. Smith; and with them lies the power to build. Two schools houses are being considered to be built: one for the boarders, and one for the day school students. They are now searching for a suitable place to build the buildings. In those schools, knowledge will be taught to the children in all facets of the English language, as well as learning that will be helpful for advancement in their adult life. Here is your new place of learning, O Hawaiians who are without parents, who are indigent, and so forth. Education in this land is progressing, and therefore, “Let the life of the land live on in righteousness.”

(Kuokoa, 11/8/1884, p. 2)

Kuokoa_11_8_1884_2.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXIII, Helu 45, Aoao 2. Novemaba 8, 1884.

 

 

The birthday of Pauahi, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of The Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who passed on, Ke alii Pauahi is one who lives on in the minds of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth and before her passing, she left most of it to build a School for the children of her people. Her strong desire was that her lahui be taught English and the proper knowledge for them to progress. Today there has been hundreds who have benefited from the knowledge they gained from these schools. She has gone on but left an unforgettable monument standing upon her land.

Lunalilo blessed the old people of his aina; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing the race; Pauahi, educates those children. Those are the alii who left enduring monuments; and their names shall forever reverberate against the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

O nehinei ka la hanau o Ke Alii Wahine Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.